An Appeal for Human Rights

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An Appeal for Human Rights was drafted by Roslyn Pope and other students of the Atlanta University Center after the students, led by Lonnie King and Julian Bond, were encouraged by the six presidents of the Atlanta University Center to draft a document released on March 15, 1960.[1][2][3][4] The students, organized as the Committee on Appeal for Human Rights (COAHR), published "An Appeal for Human Rights" on March 9, 1960.[5][6] working within and part of the African-American Civil Rights Movement.

The published document, "An Appeal for Human Rights" was a widely circulated and initially printed on March 9, 1960 in several publications including Atlanta Constitution (today The Atlanta Journal-Constitution), Atlanta Journal (today also The Atlanta Journal-Constitution), and Atlanta Daily World.[7]

The "Appeal for Human Rights" was received with both positive acclaim, and skeptical criticism at the time of publishing.[8]

Original signers[edit]

"An Appeal for Human Rights" of March 9, 1960 was originally signed by:

Willie Mays - President of Council For the Students of Atlanta University
James Felder - President of Student Government Association For the Students of Clark College
Marion D. Bennett - President of Student Association For the Students of Interdenominational Theological Center
Don Clarke - President of Student Body For the Students of Morehouse College
Mary Ann Smith - Secretary of Student Government Association For the Students of Morris Brown College
Roslyn Pope - President of Student Government Association For the Students of Spelman College

References[edit]

  1. ^ Appeal for Human Rights - Civil Rights Movement Veterans
  2. ^ Appeal for Human Rights - Committee on Appeal for Human Rights
  3. ^ Interview (Audio) This Day in History, 1960 (2009-03-09) - PBA Online
  4. ^ An Appeal for Human Rights - Democratic Underground
  5. ^ Atlanta Sit-ins - Civil Rights Movement Veterans
  6. ^ Students begin to lead Direct Action and Desegregation (1960-1965) - Atlanta in the Civil Rights Movement
  7. ^ Atlanta Sit-ins - New Georgia Encyclopedia
  8. ^ Interview with Lonnie King - PBA Online

External links[edit]