Ana Maria Rey

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Ana Maria Rey
Ana Maria Rey among 2014 PECASE winners.jpg
Rey in 2014
Born1976/1977 (age 43–44)
NationalityColombian
Alma materUniversidad de los Andes, University of Maryland
ChildrenNicolás[1]
AwardsMacArthur Fellowship, Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award, Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Award, Blavatnik Award for Young Scientists
Scientific career
InstitutionsUniversity of Colorado Boulder, National Institute of Standards and Technology
ThesisUltracold bosonic atoms loaded in optical lattices (2004)
Doctoral advisorCharles Clark [2]

Ana Maria Rey is a Colombian theoretical physicist, professor at University of Colorado at Boulder, a JILA fellow, a fellow at National Institute of Standards and Technology and a fellow of the American Physical Society.[3] Rey was the first Hispanic woman to win the Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists in 2019.[4]

Education[edit]

Rey earned a bachelor's degree in physics at Universidad de los Andes[5] in Bogotá in 1999 with a magna cum laude distinction.[5] She got her Ph.D. in physics at University of Maryland in 2004.[6] She was a postdoctoral researcher at the National Institute of Standards and Technology from 2004 to 2005 in the group of Charles W. Clark.[5] She went on to work as a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute of Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (ITAMP) at Harvard University [7] from 2005 to 2008.

Research and career[edit]

After her postdoctoral position at ITAMP, she joined the University of Colorado Boulder Physics Department as an assistant research professor and JILA as an associate fellow in 2008. She was promoted to JILA Fellow in 2012 and shifted her position in the department of Physics to adjoint professor in 2017.[8]

Rey is a theoretical quantum physicist who works on ways of developing new techniques for controlling quantum systems and their applications ranging from quantum simulations/information to time and frequency standards. Her research is often directly applicable to state-of-the-art experiments, in particular to atomic clocks,[9] quantum computing,[10] and precision measurements. Her publications have been cited more than 11,000 times as of 2020.[11]

Awards and honours[edit]

Personal life[edit]

On July 29, 2000, Rey got married. Two days later, she immigrated to the United States.[1]

Selected publications[edit]

The most cited publications by Rey to the date are:[14]

  • S Trotzky, P Cheinet, S Fölling, M Feld, U Schnorrberger, AM Rey. Time-resolved observation and control of superexchange interactions with ultracold atoms in optical lattices. (2008( Science 319 (5861), 295-299
  • AV Gorshkov, M Hermele, V Gurarie, C Xu, PS Julienne, J Ye, P Zoller. Two-orbital SU (N) magnetism with ultracold alkaline-earth atoms. (2010) Nature physics 6 (4), 289-295
  • B Yan, SA Moses, B Gadway, JP Covey, KRA Hazzard, AM Rey, DS Jin. Observation of dipolar spin-exchange interactions with lattice-confined polar molecules. (2013) Nature 501 (7468), 521-525
  • JG Bohnet, BC Sawyer, JW Britton, ML Wall, AM Rey, M Foss-Feig. Quantum spin dynamics and entanglement generation with hundreds of trapped ions. (2016) Science 352 (6291), 1297-1301
  • M Gärttner, JG Bohnet, A Safavi-Naini, ML Wall, JJ Bollinger, AM Rey. Measuring out-of-time-order correlations and multiple quantum spectra in a trapped-ion quantum magnet. (2017) Nature Physics 13 (8), 781-786
  • X Zhang, M Bishof, SL Bromley, CV Kraus, MS Safronova, P Zoller. Spectroscopic observation of SU (N)-symmetric interactions in Sr orbital magnetism. (2014) Science 345 (6203), 1467-1473

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Larraz, Irene (December 29, 2013). "'No soy una genio, solo soy muy dedicada': física premiada en EE. UU". El Tiempo (in Spanish). Archived from the original on April 17, 2014. Retrieved April 16, 2014.
  2. ^ "UMD alumna Ana Maria Rey wins MacArthur Foundation "genius grant"". University of Maryland. September 25, 2013. Archived from the original on April 17, 2014. Retrieved April 17, 2014.
  3. ^ pamela.corey@nist.gov (2017-09-11). "2014 APS Fellow - Ana Maria Rey". NIST. Retrieved 2020-11-05.
  4. ^ a b "CU Boulder researcher is first Hispanic woman to win early-career award". Boulder Daily Camera. 2019-06-26. Retrieved 2019-06-27.
  5. ^ a b c "Rey | Rey Theory Group". jila.colorado.edu. Retrieved 2020-05-10.
  6. ^ a b Suarez, Monica (September 25, 2013). "Latina physicist chosen for MacArthur Foundation "genius" award". NBC Latino. Archived from the original on April 17, 2014. Retrieved April 16, 2014.
  7. ^ Bouza, Teresa (December 26, 2013). "La física Ana María Rey recibió galardón de la Casa Blanca por, Nación". Semana (in Spanish). Archived from the original on April 16, 2014. Retrieved April 16, 2014.
  8. ^ "Rey | Rey Theory Group". jila.colorado.edu. Retrieved 2020-11-05.
  9. ^ "Tying Quantum Knots with an Optical Clock | Rey Theory Group". jila.colorado.edu. Retrieved 2020-11-05.
  10. ^ "Phases on the Move: A Quantum Game of Catch | Rey Theory Group". jila.colorado.edu. Retrieved 2020-11-05.
  11. ^ "Ana Maria Rey". scholar.google.com. Retrieved 2020-11-05.
  12. ^ pamela.corey@nist.gov (2017-09-11). "2014 Early Career National Hispanic Scientist of the Year - Ana Maria Rey". NIST. Retrieved 2020-11-05.
  13. ^ "2014 Maria Goeppert Mayer Award Recipient". Archived from the original on April 17, 2014. Retrieved April 17, 2014.
  14. ^ "Ana Maria Rey - Google Scholar". scholar.google.co.uk. Retrieved 2020-07-16.

External links[edit]