Anabantiformes

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Anabantiformes
Anabas testudineus.png
Climbing Perch (Anabas testudineus)
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Clade: Percomorpha
Order: Anabantiformes
Britz, 1995
Suborders and Families[1]
Synonyms

The Anabantiformes are an order of freshwater ray-finned fish with seven families (Pristolepididae, Badidae, Nandidae, Channidae, Anabantidae, Helostomatidae, and Osphronemidae) and having at least 252 species.[2][3] This group of fish are found in Asia and Africa, with some species introduced in United States of America.

These fish are characterized by the presence of teeth on the parasphenoid.[3] The snakeheads and the anabantoids are united by the presence of the labyrinth organ, which is a much-folded suprabranchial accessory breathing organ. It is formed by vascularized expansion of the epibranchial bone of the first gill arch and used for respiration in air.[4][3]

Many species are popular as aquarium fish - the most notable are the Siamese fighting fish and several species of gouramies[4]. In addition to being aquarium fish, anabantiforms (such as the giant gourami[5]) are also harvested for food in their native countries. Other species of gouramies are also harvested for food.[4][6]

Systematics[edit]

Phylogeny[edit]

Below shows the phylogenetic relationships among the anabantiform families after Collins et al. (2015):[2]

Anabantiformes
Nandoidei

Pristolepididae

Badidae

Nandidae

Channoidei

Channidae

Anabantoidei

Anabantidae

Helostomatidae

Osphronemidae

Taxonomy[edit]

Below is a taxonomic list of extant anabantiforms at the genera level.[2][1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b R. Betancur-Rodriguez, E. Wiley, N. Bailly, A. Acero, M. Miya, G. Lecointre, G. Ortí: Phylogenetic Classification of Bony Fishes – Version 4 (2016)
  2. ^ a b c Collins, R.A.; Britz, R.; Rüber,, L. (2015). "Phylogenetic systematics of leaffishes (Teleostei: Polycentridae, Nandidae)" (PDF). Journal of Zoological Systematics and Evolutionary Research. 53 (4): 259–272.
  3. ^ a b c Nelson, J.S.; Grande, T.C.; Wilson, M.V. (2016). Fishes of the World. John Wiley & Sons.
  4. ^ a b c Pinter, H. (1986). Labyrinth Fish. Barron's Educational Series, Inc., ISBN 0-8120-5635-3
  5. ^ Chanphong, Jitkasem. (1995). Diseases of Giant Gourami, Osphronemus goramy (Lacepede) Archived January 6, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. The Aquatic Animal Health Research Institute Newsletter 4(1).
  6. ^ Froese, R.; D. Pauly (eds.). "Trichogaster trichopterus". FishBase. Retrieved 2006-12-23.