Anaphalis margaritacea

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Anaphalis margaritacea
Anapahlis margaritacea.jpg
Close-up of the capitula

Secure (NatureServe)[1]
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Asterids
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Anaphalis
Species:
A. margaritacea
Binomial name
Anaphalis margaritacea
(L.) Benth. & Hook.f. (1873) Sources: NatureServe,[1] IPNI,[2] GRIN[3]
Synonyms[4]
Synonymy
  • Anaphalis angustifolia Rydb.
  • Anaphalis cinnamomea (DC.) C.B.Clarke
  • Anaphalis japonica Maxim.
  • Anaphalis lanata (A.Nelson) Rydb.
  • Anaphalis occidentalis (Greene) A.Heller
  • Anaphalis sierrae A.Heller
  • Anaphalis subalpina (A.Gray) Rydb.
  • Anaphalis timmua D.Don
  • Anaphalis timmua (Buch.-Ham. ex D.Don) Hand.-Mazz.
  • Anaphalis yedoensis Maxim.
  • Antennaria cinnamomea DC.
  • Antennaria margaritacea (L.) R.Br. ex DC.
  • Antennaria margaritacea (L.) Sweet
  • Antennaria plantaginea Sweet
  • Antennaria timmua Buch.-Ham. ex D.Don
  • Chamaezelum margaritaceum Link
  • Gnaphalium americanum Greene 1894 not Mill. 1768
  • Gnaphalium hypophaeum Spreng. ex DC.
  • Gnaphalium margaritaceum L.
  • Gnaphalium timmua Buch.-Ham. ex Spreng.
  • Gnaphalium wightianum Thwaites
  • Helichrysum margaritaceum (L.) Moench
  • Antennaria japonica Sch.Bip.
  • Gnaphalium yedoense Franch. & Sav.

Anaphalis margaritacea, commonly known as the western pearly everlasting[5] or pearly everlasting, is an Asian and North American species of flowering perennial plant in the family Asteraceae.

Description[edit]

Flowers with pearly white bracts

A. margaritacea grows erect up to about 90 centimetres (3 feet) tall,[6] with narrow, alternate leaves up to 12.5 cm (5 inches). The undersides of the leaves are densely covered in tiny hairs.[7] The stems are dry and brittle. The whitish to yellowish flower grows to about 6 millimetres (14 in) across[7] as part of a corymb inflorescence, the most conspicuous part of which is the numerous pearly white bracts that surround the disc florets.[8] It blooms between June and September.[7]

The plant is dioecious, meaning the pollen-producing (male) and seed-producing (female) flowers are borne on separate plants.[7]

Taxonomy[edit]

Varieties and subspecies[4]
  • Anaphalis margaritacea var. cinnamomea (DC.) Herder ex Maxim.
  • Anaphalis margaritacea subsp. japonica (Maxim.) Kitam.
  • Anaphalis margaritacea var. margaritacea
  • Anaphalis margaritacea var. yedoensis (Franch. & Sav.) Ohwi

Etymology[edit]

The species' common name 'pearly everlasting'[9] comes from the pearly white bracts.[10]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

It is widespread across most of Canada and the United States, as well as northwestern Mexico.[8][11] Asian populations are found in China, the Russian Far East, Japan, Korea, northern Indochina, and the Himalayas.[12] The species is reportedly naturalized in Europe though not native there. It prefers dry, sunny climates, but is hardy to temperatures well below freezing.[7][additional citation(s) needed]

Ecology[edit]

The leaves are host to the caterpillars of the American painted lady butterfly (Vanessa virginiensis)[13] and the painted lady butterfly (Vanessa cardui).[14]

Uses[edit]

The leaves and young plants are edible when cooked.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b NatureServe (2006). "Anaphalis margaritacea". NatureServe Explorer: An online encyclopedia of life, Version 6.1. Arlington, Virginia. Archived from the original on 2007-09-29. Retrieved 2007-06-27.
  2. ^ "Anaphalis margaritacea". International Plant Names Index (IPNI). Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 2008-06-08.
  3. ^ "Anaphalis margaritacea". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved 2008-06-08.
  4. ^ a b "Anaphalis margaritacea". The Global Compositae Checklist (GCC) – via The Plant List.
  5. ^ USDA, NRCS (n.d.). "Anaphalis margaritacea". The PLANTS Database (plants.usda.gov). Greensboro, North Carolina: National Plant Data Team. Retrieved 8 January 2016.
  6. ^ Hogan, C. Michael (2010). "Anaphalis margaritacea". Encyclopedia of Life. Retrieved 2022-07-03.
  7. ^ a b c d e Spellenberg, Richard (2001) [1979]. National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Wildflowers: Western Region (rev ed.). Knopf. p. 354. ISBN 978-0-375-40233-3.
  8. ^ a b Nesom, Guy L. (2006). "Anaphalis margaritacea". In Flora of North America Editorial Committee (ed.). Flora of North America North of Mexico (FNA). Vol. 19. New York and Oxford – via eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
  9. ^ BSBI List 2007 (xls). Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2015-06-26. Retrieved 2014-10-17.
  10. ^ Fagan, Damian (2019). Wildflowers of Oregon: A Field Guide to Over 400 Wildflowers, Trees, and Shrubs of the Coast, Cascades, and High Desert. Guilford, CT: FalconGuides. p. 27. ISBN 978-1-4930-3633-2. OCLC 1073035766.
  11. ^ "Anaphalis margaritacea". County-level distribution map from the North American Plant Atlas (NAPA). Biota of North America Program (BONAP). 2014.
  12. ^ Zhu, Shixin; Bayer, Randall J. "Anaphalis margaritacea". Flora of China. Vol. 20–21 – via eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
  13. ^ "Vanessa virginiensis". Butterflies and Moths of North America.
  14. ^ The Xerces Society (2016), Gardening for Butterflies: How You Can Attract and Protect Beautiful, Beneficial Insects, Timber Press.
  15. ^ "Pearly everlasting (Anaphalis margaritacea)".

External links[edit]