Anarcho-tyranny

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Anarcho-tyranny, as suggested when introduced by Samuel T. Francis[1] in 1992, is a Hegelian synthesis of the two opposites anarchy and tyranny.[2]

Lew Rockwell summarized the description of the term in 2003 as "the simultaneous existence of armed dictatorship and the absence of the rule of law."[1] Referring to the 2003 invasion of Iraq, Rockwell said such a state underscored "the primary focal point of the rule of every regime: to maintain and tighten its monopoly over the coercive powers of the state, while displacing and eliminating possible competitors to that position."[1]

When Francis died in 2005, his photo appeared on the cover of Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture in the April issue "Anarcho-Tyranny: The Perpetual Revolution".[3] and an article by Francis was published. Francis argued that "Anarcho-tyranny is entirely deliberate, a calculated transformation of the function of the state from one committed to protecting the law-abiding citizenry to a state that treats the law-abiding citizen as, at best, a social pathology and, at worst, an enemy."[2] The magazine has since revisited the subject multiple times by writers Srđa Trifković (2005[4]), Thomas Fleming (2005[5] and 2014[6]), Eugene Girin (2014[6]), and John Seiler (2014[7]). The term has been used by several other writers over the years.[8][9][10]

See also[edit]

  • Managerial state, a concept used in critiquing modern procedural democracy in Western countries

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Lew Rockwell. "Anarcho-Tyranny in Baghdad", lewrockwell.com, 12 April 2003. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  2. ^ a b Samuel Francis. "Synthesizing Tyranny", Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, April 2005 issue. At the Internet Archive.
  3. ^ "April 2005—Anarcho-Tyranny: The Perpetual Revolution", Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, April 2005 issue. At the Internet Archive.
  4. ^ Srđa Trifković. "Global Anarcho-Tyranny", Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, 1 March 2005.
  5. ^ Thomas Fleming. "Synthesizing Tyranny", Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, 1 March 2005.
  6. ^ a b Eugene Girin. "Witnessing Anarcho-Tyranny", Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, 20 October 2014.
  7. ^ John Seiler. "Obama Imposes Anarcho-Tyranny on Ferguson", Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, 25 November 2014.
  8. ^ Eric Peters. "The Tyranny of Traffic Enforcement", lewrockwell.com, 12 April 2011.
  9. ^ Aurelian Craiutu. "Thinking with Tocqueville: Courage not Ambition, Moderation not Pessimism", Law & Liberty, 30 November 2012. (Craiutu is Professor of Political Science at Indiana University, Bloomington.[1])
  10. ^ Jerry Salyer. "Paleoconservatives and Trump", The Catholic World Report, 10 November 2016