Anavryti, Laconia

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Anavryti
Αναβρυτή
Photograph of the village's clock tower
Photograph of the village's clock tower
Anavryti is located in Greece
Anavryti
Anavryti
Coordinates: 37°2′N 22°22′E / 37.033°N 22.367°E / 37.033; 22.367Coordinates: 37°2′N 22°22′E / 37.033°N 22.367°E / 37.033; 22.367
Country Greece
Administrative region Peloponnese
Regional unit Laconia
Municipality Sparti
Municipal unit Mystras
Elevation 850 m (2,790 ft)
Population (2001)[1]
 • Rural 74
Community
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
 • Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
Area code(s) 27310

Anavryti or Anavriti (Αναβρυτή) is a small village in Laconia, Greece on Taygetus mountain, altitude 850m. Above the Evrotas valley, Anavryti is traversed by European walking route E4. It is part of the municipal unit of Mystras.

A paved road to Anavryti was built in the 1980s with donations sent by the Anavryti Hometown society in Astoria, Queens, New York. Until that time, the village could only be accessed on foot or by donkey.

During World War II Nazi occupation, forces made the steep climb up to the village to destroy the houses of suspected partisans.

Over the years the village has been established as an eco-tourism destination. The many walking paths combined with its landscape makes the area popular with photographer.[2] The village has a simple hotel and restaurants.

In Anavryti's Geological Museum, a variety of elements and pictures related to the fauna and flora of the village and its surroundings are exhibited. There is also an exhibit about Mount Taygetus.

There is a tradition that when the Jewish community of Mystras was expelled by the Venetians, they sought refuge in Anavryti and were the ancestors of some of today's inhabitants.[3]

Notable people from Anavryti[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ De Facto Population of Greece Population and Housing Census of March 18th, 2001 (PDF 39 MB). National Statistical Service of Greece. 2003. 
  2. ^ Landscapes of the Southern Peloponnese: a countryside guide, Michael Cullen, Sunflower Guides, Hunter Publishing, Inc, 2004, p. 91
  3. ^ Patrick Leigh-Fermor, Mani: Travels in the Southern Peloponnese. London, Penguin Books, 1984