Anax (dragonfly)

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For the Greek word, see Anax (Greek).
Anax
Anax parthenope.jpg
Anax parthenope
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Odonata
Infraorder: Anisoptera
Family: Aeshnidae
Genus: Anax
Leach, 1815[1]
Type species
Anax imperator
Leach, 1815

Anax (from Ancient Greek ἄναξ anax, "lord, master, king")[2] is a genus of dragonflies in the family Aeshnidae. It contains species like the emperor dragonfly, Anax imperator.[3]

Species[edit]

The genus includes the following species:[4]

Notes[edit]

The genus Anax was described by William Elford Leach in 1815 when he published the first bibliography of entomology in Brewster's Edinburgh Encyclopedia.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Leach, W.E. (1815). "Entomology". In Brewster, David. Edinburgh Encyclopaedia. 9. Edinburgh: William Blackwood. pp. 57-172 [137] (in 1830 edition) – via Biodiversity Heritage Library. 
  2. ^ ἄναξ. Liddell, Henry George; Scott, Robert; A Greek–English Lexicon at the Perseus Project.
  3. ^ "Genus Anax Leach, 1815". Australian Faunal Directory. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. 9 October 2008. Retrieved 18 April 2010. 
  4. ^ Martin Schorr; Martin Lindeboom; Dennis Paulson. "World Odonata List". University of Puget Sound. Retrieved 3 Oct 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d e "North American Odonata". University of Puget Sound. 2009. Archived from the original on 11 July 2010. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  6. ^ Suhling, F. (2006). "Anax bangweuluensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 25 Aug 2010. 
  7. ^ Suhling, F. & Clausnitzer, V. (2008). "Anax chloromelas". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 25 Aug 2010. 
  8. ^ Clausnitzer, V. (2008). "Anax ephippiger". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 25 Aug 2010. 
  9. ^ a b c Theischinger, Gunther (2006). The Complete Field Guide to Dragonflies of Australia. CSIRO Publishing. ISBN 0-643-09073-8. 
  10. ^ "Anax gladiator Dijkstra & Kipping". PLAZI. Retrieved 29 July 2016. 
  11. ^ "Checklist, English common names". DragonflyPix.com. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  12. ^ a b "Checklist of UK Species". British Dragonfly Society. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  13. ^ Clausnitzer, V. (2006). "Anax imperator". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 25 Aug 2010. 
  14. ^ Anax indicus, Dragonflies and Damselflies of Thailand
  15. ^ "Anax nigrofasciatus". The ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity. Retrieved 25 August 2010. 
  16. ^ ABRS (2012-07-18). "Species Anax papuensis (Burmeister, 1839)". Australian Faunal Directory. Australian Biological Resources Study. Retrieved 2017-01-23. 
  17. ^ Clausnitzer, V. (2006). "Anax speratus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 25 Aug 2010. 
  18. ^ "Anax strenuus". Hawaii Biological Survey. Retrieved 25 August 2010. 
  19. ^ Clausnitzer, V. (2006). "Anax tristis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 25 Aug 2010.