And the Wiener Is...

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"And the Wiener Is..."
Family Guy episode
Episode no. Season 3
Episode 5
Directed by Bert Ring
Written by Mike Barker and Matt Weitzman
Production code 2ACX22
Original air date August 8, 2001
Guest appearance(s)
Episode chronology
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Family Guy (season 3)
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"And the Wiener Is..." is the fifth episode of the third season of the animated comedy series Family Guy, the last episode produced for Season 2. It originally aired on Fox on August 8, 2001. The episode features Chris and Peter, when Peter finds out his son has a bigger penis than he does. Insecure about his manhood, Peter attempts to out-do his son's newfound manhood by joining the National Gun Association, thinking it will make up for the size of his own penis.

The episode was written by Mike Barker and Matt Weitzman and directed by Bert Ring. The episode featured guest performances by Patrick Duffy, Rachael MacFarlane, Tara Strong, Lisa Wilhoit and Debra Wilson, along with several recurring guest voice actors for the series.

Plot[edit]

In this episode, Peter is sure his son Chris will never beat him at anything, from skating, to stacking dinnerware on top of their heads, and playing basketball. But, after doing the latter, when Peter and Chris are in the sauna at the gym naked, Peter suddenly discovers that Chris has a bigger penis than he does. Suddenly insecure, Peter buys a long, red car, in which he drives in and out of a tunnel imitating sexual penetration. Later, he joins the National Gun Association because he thinks that it will make up for the size of his own penis. On a hunting trip, a bear attacks Peter and Chris, but Chris drives away the bear that threatened to kill them both, and the two reconcile.

Meanwhile, Meg tries out for cheerleading but is accepted into the flag girl squad instead. As her squad performs, several of the cooler kids, consisting of Connie D'Amico and her trio of cronies: Gina, Scott, and Doug, rig a device that pelts Meg with rotten meat. Lois then devises a plan for revenge. Meg makes friends with Connie, but this does not last, as Connie and her friends trick Meg at a party for Connie's 16th birthday. Thinking she was going to kiss Connie's friend Doug while locked in a closet, Meg instead finds herself, in front of all the others, kissing a pig held by Doug. As revenge, Lois sends Quagmire to sexually harass Connie and her friends.

Production[edit]

A man with a bald head and a brown sweater, and a man with spiked brown hair and glasses, speaking into a microphone.
Mike Barker and Matt Weitzman wrote the episode.

The episode was written by series regulars Mike Barker and Matt Weitzman and directed by Bert Ring, before the conclusion of the third production season.

In addition to the regular cast, actor Patrick Duffy, voice actress Rachael MacFarlane, voice actress Tara Strong, actress Lisa Wilhoit and actress Debra Wilson guest starred in the episode. Recurring guest voice actor and writer Danny Smith also made a minor appearance. Recurring guest cast members Jennifer Tilly, Mike Henry and Patrick Warburton reprised their roles of Bonnie Swanson, Cleveland Brown and Joe Swanson respectively.

Controversy[edit]

The Parents Television Council, a frequent critic of MacFarlane-produced shows, named Family Guy the “Worst TV Show of the Week” for the January 23, 2005 rebroadcast of the episode on FOX.[1] They went on to file a complaint with the Federal Communications Commission about the broadcast, although the episode, rated TV-14 for suggestive dialogue (D), offensive language (L), and moderate sexual references (S)[2] originally aired in 2001 without any complaints, and the nudity originally present was censored out.[3][4] However, the FCC denied their complaint, finding “that because of the absence of explicit or graphic descriptions or depictions of any sexual organ, along with the absence of shocking, pandering, and/or titillating effect, the episode, taken as a whole, is not patently offensive.”[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bowling, Aubree. "Family Guy—Worst Family TV Shows of the Week". ParentsTV.org. Parents Television Council. Archived from the original on 2007-09-30. Retrieved 2007-04-28. 
  2. ^ FOX Schedule
  3. ^ tv • watch
  4. ^ Rich, Frank (2005-02-06). "The Year of Living Indecently". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-11-25. 
  5. ^ Kevin Martin, Michael Copps, Deborah Tate, Jonathan Adelstein (2006-03-15). "Notices of Apparent Liability and Memorandum Opinion and Order" (PDF). Federal Communications Commission. Retrieved 2007-07-23. “[A]lthough the word ‘penis’ and euphemisms for that word are repeated several times in the episode, we find that because of the absence of explicit or graphic descriptions or depictions of any sexual organ, along with incest and the absence of shocking, pandering, and/or titillating effect, the episode, taken as a whole, is not patently offensive as measured by contemporary community standards for the broadcast medium and is therefore not indecent.”
  • S. Callaghan, “And the Wiener is...” Family Guy: The Official Episode Guide Seasons 1–3. New York: HarperCollins, 2005. 144–147.

External links[edit]