Andean textiles

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Kañari Quechua musicians wearing woven mantles, Ecuador

Andean textiles represent a continuing textile tradition spanning at least ten thousand years. Fiberwork has been found in Guitarrero Cave, Peru dates back to 8000 BCE.[1] Beginning with non-loom, twined cotton fabric, this textile tradition expanded to include alpaca and llama wool. Today Andean weavers are known worldwide for their skills and rich traditions.

Origins[edit]

The Norte Chico civilization were the earliest known users of textiles in the Andes. They wove them of wool and cotton.[2] They were also the first to use the Quipu. The Quipu is a series of knotted strings that were used for accounting, using base 10, and also possibly as a binary logographic system of writing.[3]

Quilted armour[edit]

Chancay weaving implement
1000-1400 CE, Lombards Museum

Quilted armour of the Andeans was much lighter, more comfortable, and almost as protective as European steel plate armour.[citation needed]

Loom[edit]

The Andeans used the back strap loom.

The Andeans had very advanced technology in textile technology, about as advanced as Eurasians were in metal technology[citation needed].

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stone-Miller, 17
  2. ^ Gamwell, Lynn (2015). Mathematics and Art: A Cultural History. Princeton University Press. p. 423. ISBN 978-0-691-16528-8. 
  3. ^ Gamwell, Lynn (2015). Mathematics and Art: A Cultural History. Princeton University Press. p. 460. ISBN 978-0-691-16528-8. 

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]