Andouille

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Andouille
Andouille.jpg
Creole andouille
Course Sausage
Place of origin France
Main ingredients pork, garlic, pepper, onions, wine, pork chitterlings, tripe
Cookbook: Andouille  Media: Andouille
French andouille from Guémené-sur-Scorff, France.

Andouille (/ænˈdi/ an-DOO-ee in US English; French pronunciation: ​[ɑ̃duj]; from Latin: "made by insertion") is a smoked sausage made using pork, originating in France. It was brought to Louisiana by the French immigrants and Acadian exiles that would merge to create much of Cajun Culture.

Overview[edit]

Andouille in the US[edit]

In the US the sausage is most often associated with Louisiana Cajun cuisine, where it is a coarse-grained smoked sausage made using pork, garlic, pepper, onions, wine, and seasonings. The pork used is mostly from a smoked Boston shoulder roast. Once the casing is stuffed, the sausage is smoked again (double smoked).[1] Nicknamed "The Andouille Capital of the World," the town of LaPlace, Louisiana, on the Mississippi River, is especially noted for its Creole andouille.[2] Though somewhat similar, andouille is not to be confused with "hot links" or similar finely ground, high-fat, heavily peppered sausages.

Andouille in France[edit]

In France, particularly Brittany,[3] the traditional ingredients of andouille are primarily pig chitterlings, tripe, onions, wine, and seasoning. It is generally grey in color and has a distinctive odor. Also, a similar sausage is available called andouillette, literally "little andouille." Some varieties use the pig's entire gastrointestinal system.

Other uses[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Andouille sausage (Gastronomy) – Definition" (various), MiMi.hu, 2006, webpage: Hu-Andou.
  2. ^ "Dining & Bars". NOLA.com. Retrieved 2014-01-13. 
  3. ^ http://www.produitenbretagne.com/catalogue/produits-alimentaires?field_product_trademark_value=&field_food_product_category_tid=1641
  4. ^ Davidson, Alan, and Tom Jaine. The Oxford Companion to Food. Oxford University Press, USA, 2006. 805. Print. Retrieved Aug. 09, 2010, from [1]