Andrea Razmadze

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Andrea Mikhailovich Razmadze

Native name
ანდრია რაზმაძე
Born(1889-08-12)August 12, 1889[1]
Chkhenishi, Georgia (now Samtredia)
DiedOctober 2, 1929(1929-10-02) (aged 40)[1]
Tbilisi, Georgia
NationalityGeorgian
EducationMoscow University
Known forCalculus of Variations
Scientific career
FieldsMathematics
InstitutionsTbilisi University

Andrea Mikhailovich Razmadze (sometimes spelled Andria/Andrei Razmadze, 12 August 1889 – 2 October 1929[1]) was a Georgian mathematician, and one of the founders of Tbilisi State University, whose Mathematics Institute was renamed in his honor in 1944.[2] The department's scientific journal, published continuously since 1937, was also renamed as the Proceedings of A. Razmadze Mathematical Institute in his honor.

Biography[edit]

Andrea Razmadze was the son of Mikhail Gavrilovich Razmadze, a railway worker, and Nino Georgievna Nodia.[3] He graduated from Kutaisi nonclassical secondary school in 1906 (where Public School #41 has been renamed for him[4]), then studied at Moscow University, earning a Diploma in 1910, and then a Masters in 1917 while teaching at local classical and secondary schools.[5] At the invitation of the university, he briefly stayed in Moscow University to teach mathematics in 1917,[6] but soon left to become one of the founders of Tbilisi University.[7] Though he died just 11 years later, during his time there he greatly expanded Georgian mathematical terminology by publishing three textbooks in that language,[3] and insisting that all courses be taught in Georgian, an approach that attracted renowned mathematician Nikoloz Muskhelishvili to the school.[8] He also founded the "Georgian Mathematical Union" on February 21, 1923 and was its first president; this institution lapsed on his death, but was reorganized from 1962 to the present.[9] He is most famous for his work in the calculus of variations, where he discovered an efficient method for finding the extrema of integral functions, and a comprehensive theory for finding the extrema of discontinuous ("angular") functions that can be represented by a finite number of curves.[3] He presented this last result at the 1924 International Congress of Mathematicians in Toronto,[10] for which he was awarded a Sc.D. by the Sorbonne.[5] He also delivered lectures in Jacques Hadamard's famous seminar series in Paris, along with such notables as Paul Lévy, Laurent Schwartz, and Nobel laureates Louis de Broglie and Max Born.[11]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Dedication page to volume 63" (PDF). Memoirs on Differential Equations and Mathematical Physics. Tbilisi: Razmadze Mathematical Institute. 63: 1. 2014. ISSN 1512-0015.
  2. ^ "About". Andrea Razmadze Mathematical Institute. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  3. ^ a b c Youschkevitch, A. P. "Razmadze, Andrei Mikhailovich". www.encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  4. ^ Kutaisi Regional Selection Conference. Georgia: European Youth Parliament. 2015. p. 8. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  5. ^ a b "A. Razmadze. Curriculum Vitae". A. Razmadze Mathematical Institute. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  6. ^ Russian Mathematical Surveys. London Mathematical Society. 1966. pp. 87–88.
  7. ^ Mikaberidze, Alexander. Historical Dictionary of Georgia. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 550–551. ISBN 9781442241466.
  8. ^ Maugin, Gerard A. Continuum Mechanics Through the Twentieth Century: A Concise Historical Perspective. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 189. ISBN 9789400763531.
  9. ^ "GMU - About Us". www.rmi.ge. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  10. ^ Razmadze, Andrea M. (1925). "Sur les solutions discontinues dans le calcul des variations" (PDF). Mathematische Annalen. 94: 1–52. doi:10.1007/bf01208643.
  11. ^ Mazʹja, Vladimir G.; Shaposhnikova, T. O. (1999). Jacques Hadamard: A Universal Mathematician. American Mathematical Soc. p. 172. ISBN 9780821819234.