Andreas Ogris

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Andy Ogris
Andreas OGRIS.jpg
Personal information
Full name Andreas Ogris
Date of birth (1964-10-07) 7 October 1964 (age 51)
Place of birth Vienna, Austria
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Playing position Striker
Youth career
Floridsdorfer AC
1972-1982 Favoritner AC
1983 Austria Wien
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1983–1990 Austria Wien 82 (36)
1990–1991 Espanyol 29 (4)
1991–1992 Austria Wien 26 (12)
1992 LASK Linz (loan) 15 (3)
1992–1997 Austria Wien 109 (31)
1997–1998 Admira/Wacker 13 (2)
career totals 274 (88 )
National team
1986–1997 Austria 63 (11)
Teams managed
2001–2002 1. Simmeringer SC
2002–2004 Polizei/Feuerwehr
2004–2005 ASK Schwadorf
2005–2006 1. Simmeringer SC
2008-2010 Floridsdorfer AC
2014–2015 Austria Wien (A)
2015 Austria Wien
2015- Austria Wien (A)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.


Andreas Ogris (born 7 October 1964 in Vienna) is an Austrian football manager and former player. He is the current assistant manager and reserve team coach at Austria Wien.

He is the older brother of former Austrian international and Hertha BSC player Ernst Ogris.

Club career[edit]

The red-haired Ogris played for Austria Wien from 1983 through 1997, split by short spells at Espanyol Barcelona and LASK Linz. The speedy and fiery striker finished his professional career at Admira/Wacker before moving into coaching.

International career[edit]

In 1983 Ogris played at the FIFA World Youth Championship.

He then made his senior debut for Austria in October 1986 against Albania and was a participant at the 1990 FIFA World Cup.[1] He earned 63 caps, scoring 11 goals.[2] His last international was an April 1997 World Cup qualification match against Scotland, in which he came on as a late substitute for Franz Aigner.

Coaching career[edit]

On 21 February 2014, Ogris was named head coach of the reserve team Austria Wien until the end of the season.[3] However, Herbert Gager was sacked as the head coach of the first–team[4] and didn't accept any other position within the club.[5] Therefore, Ogris took over for Gager on a permanent basis on 2 June 2014.[5] On 22 March 2015, He became head coach of the first team for the remainder of the season after Gerald Baumgartner was sacked.[6] His first match as interim head coach was a 3–1 loss to Red Bull Salzburg.[7] Thorsten Fink became head coach on 4 June 2015[8] and Ogris became his assistant.[9] His final match as interim head coach was a 2–0 loss to Red Bull Salzburg on 3 June 2015.[10] It was later decided that Ogris would return to the reserve team of Austria Wien.[11]

Coaching record[edit]

As of 4 June 2015
Team From To Record
M W D L GF GA GD Win %
1. Simmeringer SC
PSV Team für Wien
ASK Schwadorf
1. Simmeringer SC
FAC Team für Wien
Austria Wien (A) 21 February 2014[3][5] 22 March 2015[6] 34 17 9 8 73 47 +26 50.00
Austria Wien 22 March 2015[6] 3 June 2015[8][9] 14 4 5 5 15 17 −2 28.57
Austria Wien (A) 22 June 2015[11] Present 30 10 9 11 45 39 +6 33.33

Honours[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Record at FIFA Tournaments - FIFA
  2. ^ Appearances for Austrian National Team - RSSSF
  3. ^ a b "Ogris übernimmt Austria-Amateure". Österreich (in German). 21 February 2014. Retrieved 21 February 2014. 
  4. ^ "Austria feuert Trainer Gager" (in German). Österreich. 12 May 2014. Retrieved 2 June 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c "Gager verlässt Austria ganz" (in German). Österreich. 2 June 2014. Retrieved 2 June 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c "Austria feuert Baumgartner, Ogris übernimmt" (in German). Österreich. 22 March 2015. Retrieved 22 March 2015. 
  7. ^ "Meister Salzburg schlägt Austria klar 3:1". Österreich (in German). 4 April 2015. Retrieved 4 June 2015. 
  8. ^ a b "Absage an 96: Fink übernimmt Austria Wien" (in German). kicker. 28 May 2015. Retrieved 28 May 2015. 
  9. ^ a b "Fink: "Habe keine Ausstiegsklausel"" (in German). Österreich. 31 May 2015. Retrieved 4 June 2015. 
  10. ^ "2:0 gegen Austria: Bullen holen Double" (in German). Österreich. 3 June 2015. Retrieved 4 June 2015. 
  11. ^ a b "Austria: So lief 1. Training unter Fink" (in German). Österreich. 22 June 2015. Retrieved 22 June 2015.