Andres Veiel

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Andres Veiel
MJK34620 Andres Veiel (Beuys, Berlinale 2017).jpg
Andres Veiel in 2017
Born (1959-10-16) 16 October 1959 (age 59)
OccupationFilm director, screenwriter
Years active1992–present

Andres Veiel (born 16 October 1959) is a German film and theater director and author.

Biography[edit]

From 1982 to 1988, Andres Veiel studied Psychology at the Free University of Berlin and attended the director's class of Krzysztof Kieślowski at the Independent Berlin Artist Center Künstlerhaus Bethanien [1] from 1985 to 1989. As professors, the Künstlerhaus Bethanien gathered other renowned International and European directors such as Andrei Tarkovsky, Patrice Chéreau and Robert Wilson.

Andres Veiel's first documentary film Winternachtstraum (Winter Night's Dream)[2] resulted from his theatrical work with a group of senior actresses and premiered 1992 at the Duisburger Filmwoche,[3] an annual festival for German-speaking documentaries.[4]

His next documentary about a Jewish-Palestinian theater group in Israel, Balagan, won in 1993 the Findling Award than was screened at the 1994 Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale)[5] and awarded with the Peace Film Award, the Camera Award and the German Film Award in silver.[6] In 1996, Veiel shot his most personal film, Die Überlebenden (The survivors). It pictures the fate of three of Veiel's former schoolmates who committed suicide.[7][8]

In 2001, a large audience took notice of Veiel's documentary Black Box BRD, in which he is bringing the biographies of Alfred Herrhausen, chairman of the Deutsche Bank and his suspected assassin and Red Army Fraction (RAF) member Wolfgang Grams face to face. Black Box BRD has won numerous awards,[9] among others the European Film Award, the German Film Award and the Santa Barbara Film Festival Insight Award.[10]

Veiel's next released work returned to the field of theater. Die Spielwütigen (Addicted to Acting) portrays four Berlin based acting students during the period of almost seven years and premiered at the 2004 Berlin International Film Festival.[11][12]

In 2005, the documentary theater play Der Kick (The Kick) about the 2002 murder of a teenager by three neo-Nazi teenagers in East Germany, which Veiel has written together with Gesine Schmidt, was first performed at theaters in Basel (Switzerland) and Berlin and was invited to the major German Theater Festival, the Berlin Theater Festival (Theatertreffen der Berliner Festspiele [13]) in May 2006.[14] To date, the play has been performed by more than 60 theaters and has been translated into nine languages.[15] Based on the performance of the play, Veiel created a documentary film which was first shown at the Berlinale 2006.[16] Furthermore, German public radio stations collaborated with Veiel to produce an eponymic radio drama in 2005.[17]

According to his technique of longstanding and profound research when dealing with a subject, Andres Veiel explores the topics of his films also as an author of non-fictional books. Black Box BRD. Alfred Herrhausen, the Deutsche Bank, the RAF and Wolfgang Grams gathers and extends by far the results of the research shown in the film.[18] In 2007, Der Kick - ein Lehrstück über Gewalt (The Kick - a Lesson in Violence) is released [19] and is awarded with the Deutsche Jugendliteraturpreis (German Youth's Literature Award) in 2008.[20]

Wer, wenn nicht wir (If Not Us, Who?), Veiel's first feature film, was shot in 2010 and premiered in the competition of the Berlin International Film Festival in 2011,[21] where it was awarded with the Alfred Bauer Prize.[22] The film covers the history and genesis of the RAF and the relationship of the German author and publisher Bernward Vesper towards the RAF's founding members Gudrun Ensslin and Andreas Baader. Main protagonists of the film were August Diehl, Lena Lauzemis and Alexander Fehling. It received various awards,[23] including the 2011 German Film Award in Bronze [24] the Hessian Film Award for Best Feature Film and for Best Actress, as well as two awards (Best Film Silver Award, Best Male Lead) at the 2011 European Film Festival in Seville [25][26] and the Best International Film Award at the 10th Pune International Film Festival in 2012.[27]

In 2012 Veiel interviewed current and former executive board members from various leading banks. Based on this research, he wrote the theater play Das Himbeerreich (The Raspberry Empire) looking behind the curtain of the financial system, showing personal motives and professional constraints of financial players. Himbeerreich premiered at the Staatstheater Stuttgart and at the Deutsches Theater in Berlin in January 2013.[28]

In February 2017, Veiel's cinema documentary Beuys celebrated its premiere at the competition of the Berlin International Film Festival. With Beuys, Veiel succeeds in bringing the first cinema documentary about Joseph Beuys, one of the most controversial artists of the 20th century, onto the big screen.[29] During the three-year development period, Veiel conducted more than 60 interviews with contemporary witnesses of Beuys and viewed 400 hours of archival footage, went through 300 hours of audio footage and more than 20,000 photographs.[30][31] The film consists of 90% of archival footage, many of which has been published for the first time.[32] Veiel does not try to explain Beuys by the means of a classical biography, but his use of the archival footage rather “allows the viewer to not only enter the time and space that the artwork was developed in, but experience its conception and creation alongside the artist himself.” [33] Veiel is particularly interested in Beuys' extended concept of art as a social sculpture, which anticipates today's demands for basic income and a democratization of the financial and monetary system.[34]

Beuys received positive reactions. It’s described to be the film of record and “the most extensive revisiting of Beuys’s art and life for a general public.” [35] “The documentary Beuys will not only offer a psychological portrait of the man, but chronicle the many ways he sought to reverse the effects of our repressive social systems — and how his breakthroughs continue to influence artists today." [36] Furthermore it’s pointed out that both of Beuys’ “most recognisable and less emblematic works come alive on screen thanks to the inventive ways in which the director dives into the moments depicted in still pictures of the era, while his use of archival footage of Beuys’ installations proves to be a transportive decision." [37] The US - theatrical release of Beuys started on 17 January 2018 and was again well received: The village voice acknowledges that "the engaging Beuys avoids the typical pitfalls of documentaries and that Veiel’s refreshingly open-ended approach invites you to find your own answers" [38] while Glenn Kenny from the New York Times defines Beuys as "an exhilarating portrait of a unique truth-teller. Makes a strong case for Beuys, emphasizing the social conscience at work in his art." [39]

In 2017, Veiel together with the author Jutta Doberstein and in cooperation with the Deutsches Theater Berlin and the Humboldt Forum [1] initiated WHICH FUTURE?!, a two-year interdisciplinary, participatory research and theatre project, dedicated to drafting a fictional, yet evidence-based scenario for the next ten years. With international scientists, artists and the audience meeting in workshops, laboratories and plenary sessions, Which Future?! explored the correlation between knowledge, prediction and design and condensed scenarios for the future development of the financial system, the economy, the climate, food production and work into a jointly developed narrative looking at the years 2018 to 2028. The results were merged into a play that premiered at the Deutsches Theater in September 2018: Let them eat money. Which Future?! [2] A final conference in cooperation with the Humboldt Forum is planned for 2020.

The play was mainly well received and regarded as „an engrossing drama that skillfully avoids preaching or propagandizing” with special recognition for the script, which “does a fine job dramatizing the complex ideas developed during the workshops, explaining complex hypothetical economic and political scenarios in clever and nuanced ways.”[40]

Veiel lectured and lectures at various film schools and universities, including the Deutsche Film- und Fernsehakademie Berlin dffb [41] (German Film and Television Academy Berlin), the Free University of Berlin, the University of Zurich,[42] the University of Michigan and is regularly being invited by the Goethe Institute to worldwide lectures, such as in Johannesburg, New Delhi, Calcutta, Osaka, Cairo and Tunis.[43] He is member of the European Film Academy, the German Film Academy (Deutsche Filmakademie) and the Academy of Arts, Berlin.[44]

Andres Veiel lives in Berlin, Germany.

Filmography[edit]

  • 1992 Winternachtstraum (Winter Night's Dream), documentary, 82 minutes
  • 1993 Balagan, documentary, 90 minutes
  • 1996 Die Überlebenden (The Survivors), documentary, 90 minutes
  • 2001 Black Box BRD, documentary, 101 minutes
  • 2004 Die Spielwütigen (Addicted to Acting), documentary, 108 minutes
  • 2006 Der Kick (The Kick), documentary, 82 minutes
  • 2011 Wer wenn nicht wir (If Not Us, Who?), feature film, 124 minutes
  • 2017 Beuys

Theater productions[edit]

  • 2005 Der Kick (The Kick), Theater Basel and Maxim Gorki Theater Berlin
  • 2013 Das Himbeerreich (The Raspberry Empire), Staatstheater Stuttgart and Deutsches Theater Berlin
  • 2017/2018 Let Them Eat Money. WELCHE ZUKUNFT?! (Let Them Eat Money. WHICH FUTURE?!), Deutsches Theater Berlin and Humboldt Forum Berlin [45]

Awards[edit]

  • 1994 Peace Award of the Berlin International Film Festival for Balagan [46]
  • 1994 German Film Award in Silver for Balagan [47]
  • 1998 Adolf Grimme Award Best Documentary Film for The Survivors [48]
  • 2001 European Film Award for Black Box BRD [49]
  • 2002 German Film Award for Black Box BRD [50]
  • 2004 Panorama Audience Award of the Berlin International Film Festival for Addicted to Acting [51]
  • 2008 Adolf Grimme Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement for The Kick [52]
  • 2011 German Film Award in Bronze for If Not Us, Who? [53]
  • 2017 Guild of German Art House Cinemas - Best Documentary Award for Beuys [54]
  • 2018 German Film Award in Gold (Best Documentary) for Beuys [55]
  • 2018 German Film Award in Gold (Best Editing) for Beuys [56]
  • 2018 German Film Award Nominee (Best Film Score) for Beuys [57]
  • 2018 German Documentary Film Music Award for Beuys [58]

Bibliography[edit]

By Veiel[edit]

  • Andres Veiel (1991). Die letzte Probe. Ein Stück Revolution im Altenheim. Theaterstück in 3 Akten. S. Fischer Verlag, Frankfurt/Main.
  • Andres Veiel (1992). Hier drin kannst du alles haben. Ein Stück Knast. In: Theater, Theater. Aktuelle Stücke. Bd. 2. S. Fischer Verlag, Frankfurt/Main.
  • Andres Veiel (2002). Black Box BRD. Alfred Herrhausen, die Deutsche Bank, die RAF und Wolfgang Grams. Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt, Munich, ISBN 978-3-421-05468-5.
  • Andres Veiel (2007). Der Kick. Ein Lehrstück über Gewalt. Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt, Munich, ISBN 978-3-421-04213-2.
  • Gerd Koenen, Andres Veiel (2008). 1968. Bildspur eines Jahres. Fackelträger Verlag, Cologne, ISBN 978-3-7716-4359-1.
  • Andres Veiel, Beatice Ottersbach (2008). Dokumentarfilm. Werkstattberichte. UVK Verlagsgesellschaft, Konstanz, ISBN 978-3-86764085-5.

About Veiel[edit]

  • Nikolas Fischer (2009). Das Kino des Andres Veiel. Politische Filme im Balanceakt zwischen Dokument und Fiktion. Mensch und Buch Verlag, Berlin, ISBN 978-3-86664-527-1.
  • Claudia Lenssen (2019): Andres Veiel. Schüren Verlag, Marburg ISBN 978-3-89472-717-8 (to be published in March 2019)

References[edit]

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  6. ^ "Balagan". 20 April 1994. Retrieved 24 April 2017 – via IMDb.
  7. ^ "Die Überlebenden". 1 January 2000. Retrieved 24 April 2017 – via IMDb.
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  28. ^ "Deutsches Theater Berlin - The Raspberry Empire (Das Himbeerreich)". Deutschestheater.de. 16 January 2013. Archived from the original on 14 July 2014. Retrieved 18 June 2014.
  29. ^ "The multiples of Joseph Beuys". The multiples of Joseph Beuys. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  30. ^ (www.dw.com), Deutsche Welle. "Why avant-garde German artist Joseph Beuys' politics remain relevant to this day | Film | DW | 19 May 2017". DW.COM. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  31. ^ "Interview with 'Beuys' director Andres Veiel". www.theabstractnews.com. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  32. ^ Desk, BWW News. "BEUYS, Documentary Portrait of Joseph Beuys, Has U.S. Theatrical Premiere 1/17". Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  33. ^ "Beuys : A celebratory tribute to a celebrated artist". Cineuropa - the best of european cinema. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  34. ^ "Interview with 'Beuys' director Andres Veiel". www.theabstractnews.com. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  35. ^ "Beuys the myth, more than the artist, explained in new documentary". www.theartnewspaper.com. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  36. ^ "Finally, a Joseph Beuys Documentary". Hyperallergic. 21 November 2017. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  37. ^ "Beuys : A celebratory tribute to a celebrated artist". Cineuropa - the best of european cinema. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  38. ^ "The Engaging "Beuys" Avoids the Typical Pitfalls of Documentaries". Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  39. ^ Kenny, Glenn (2018). "Review: In 'Beuys,' a Portrait of the Artist as a Socially Conscious Provocateur". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  40. ^ "German Plays Tackle the World's Woes, Current and Future". Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  41. ^ "dffb › akademie › die_dffb". Dffb.de. Retrieved 18 June 2014.
  42. ^ "Institute for the Performing Arts and Film » Gäste". Ipf.zhdk.ch. 13 February 2013. Retrieved 18 June 2014.
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  44. ^ "Deutsche Filmakademie: Nominierungen FIRST STEPS Award 2013 stehen fest". Deutsche-filmakademie.de. 21 August 2013. Archived from the original on 14 July 2014. Retrieved 18 June 2014.
  45. ^ "English". Welche Zukunft?!. Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  46. ^ Veiel, Andres (1994), Balagan, Kahled Abu Ali, Anat Kirshner, Madi Ma'ayan, retrieved 22 January 2018
  47. ^ Veiel, Andres (1994), Balagan, Kahled Abu Ali, Anat Kirshner, Madi Ma'ayan, retrieved 22 January 2018
  48. ^ Veiel, Andres, Die Überlebenden, retrieved 22 January 2018
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  50. ^ Veiel, Andres (24 May 2001), Black Box BRD, Pater Augustinus, Roswitha Bleith-Bendieck, Paul Brand, retrieved 22 January 2018
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  52. ^ Veiel, Andres (21 September 2006), Der Kick, Susanne-Marie Wrage, Markus Lerch, retrieved 22 January 2018
  53. ^ Veiel, Andres (10 March 2011), If Not Us, Who?, August Diehl, Lena Lauzemis, Alexander Fehling, retrieved 22 January 2018
  54. ^ Beuys, retrieved 22 January 2018
  55. ^ "German Film Awards (2018)". IMDb. Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  56. ^ "German Film Awards (2018)". IMDb. Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  57. ^ "German Film Awards (2018)". IMDb. Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  58. ^ "DOK.fest München". DOK.fest München. Retrieved 2 May 2018.

External links[edit]