Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction

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Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction
Logo of The Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction & Nonfiction.png
Awarded for Best adult fiction & non-fiction
Sponsored by
Location ALA annual conference
Country USA
Presented by American Library Association
Hosted by American Library Association
Reward(s) $5,000 (winner)
$1,500 (finalists)
First awarded 2012
Website www.ala.org/awardsgrants/carnegieadult

The Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction were established in 2012 to recognize the best fiction and nonfiction books for adult readers published in the U.S. in the previous year.[1] They are named in honor of nineteenth-century American philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in recognition of his deep belief in the power of books and learning to change the world.[2] The award is supported by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and administered by the American Library Association (ALA).[1] Booklist and the Reference and User Services Association (RUSA) cosponsor the awards.[1] The shortlist and winners are selected by a seven-member selection committee of library experts who work with adult readers.[1] The annually appointed selection committee includes a chair, three Booklist editors or contributors, and three former members of RUSA CODES Notable Books Council.[1]

The winners, one each for fiction and nonfiction, are announced at an event in June at the American Library Association Annual Conference; winning authors receive a $5,000 cash award, and two finalists in each category receive $1,500.[1]

Winners and finalists[edit]

Fiction[edit]

Winners and finalists in fiction
Year Winner Work Finalists Refs.
2012 Anne Enright The Forgotten Waltz [3][4]
2013 Richard Ford Canada [5][6][7]
2014 Donna Tartt The Goldfinch [8]
2015 Anthony Doerr All the Light We Cannot See [9][10]
2016 Viet Thanh Nguyen The Sympathizer [11][12]
2017 Colson Whitehead The Underground Railroad [13][14]
2018 Jennifer Egan Manhattan Beach [15][16]

Nonfiction[edit]

Winners and finalists in nonfiction
Year Winner Work Finalists Refs.
2012 Robert K. Massie Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman [3][4]
2013 Timothy Egan Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher: The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis
  • Jill Lepore, The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death
  • David Quammen, Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic
[5][6][7]
2014 Doris Kearns Goodwin The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism [8]
2015 Bryan Stevenson Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption [9][10]
2016 Sally Mann Hold Still: A Memoir with Photographs [11][12]
2017 Matthew Desmond Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City [13][14]
2018 No award given [A] No award given [17][18]

Notes[edit]

  • A The 2018 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction was originally awarded to Sherman Alexie for his book, You Don't Have to Say You Love Me: A Memoir, but Alexie declined the award amid sexual harassment allegations. In response, ALA said in a statement that "We acknowledge his decision and will not award the Carnegie nonfiction medal in 2018."[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction & Nonfiction (official website)". Archived from the original on January 16, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Carnegie Corporation of New York and the American Library Association Announce New Literary Prizes". carnegie.org. March 5, 2012. Archived from the original on April 16, 2012. Retrieved May 23, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Wyatt, Neal (May 21, 2012). "Wyatt's World: The Carnegie Medals Short List". Library Journal. Archived from the original on May 27, 2012. Retrieved May 23, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Kellogg, Carolyn (June 25, 2012). "First-ever Carnegie Awards in Literature go to Enright, Massie". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on June 29, 2012. Retrieved June 25, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b Bill Ott (June 30, 2013). "Richard Ford and Timothy Egan Win Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction". Booklist. Archived from the original on March 30, 2014. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  6. ^ a b Annalisa Pesek (July 3, 2013). "2013 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction". Library Journal. Archived from the original on March 18, 2014. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b "ALA Unveils 2013 Finalists for Andrew Carnegie Medals". Publishers Weekly. April 22, 2013. Archived from the original on March 18, 2014. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  8. ^ a b Italie, Hillel (June 30, 2014). "Tartt, Goodwin awarded Carnegie medals". Seattle Times. Associated Press. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved July 1, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b "ALA unveils shortlist for 2015 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction" (Press release). Boston: American Library Association. PR Newswire. April 6, 2015. Archived from the original on October 25, 2015. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  10. ^ a b "Anthony Doerr wins Carnegie Medal for fiction". Midcontinent Communications. Associated Press. June 28, 2015. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2015. 
  11. ^ a b "2016 Carnegie Medals Shortlist Announced". American Libraries Magazine. October 19, 2015. Archived from the original on November 17, 2015. Retrieved November 15, 2015. 
  12. ^ a b ""The Sympathizer," "Hold Still," receive 2016 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction" (Press release). Boston: American Library Association. PR Newswire. January 10, 2016. Archived from the original on January 14, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  13. ^ a b "Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction & Nonfiction | Awards & Grants". www.ala.org. Archived from the original on February 21, 2017. Retrieved February 13, 2017. 
  14. ^ a b "'The Underground Railroad,' 'Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City,' receive 2017 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction". American Library Association. Archived from the original on February 14, 2017. Retrieved February 13, 2017. 
  15. ^ "Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction & Nonfiction". American Library Association. Retrieved 10 March 2018. 
  16. ^ "Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction 2018 Finalists". American Library Association. Retrieved 10 March 2018. 
  17. ^ "Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction & Nonfiction". American Library Association. Retrieved 10 March 2018. 
  18. ^ "Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction 2018 Finalists". American Library Association. Retrieved 10 March 2018. 
  19. ^ Romo, Vanessa. "Beset By Sexual Harassment Claims, Sherman Alexie Declines Literary Prize". NPR. Retrieved 10 March 2018. 

External links[edit]