Andrew County, Missouri

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Andrew County
Andrew County Courthouse
Andrew County Courthouse
Map of Missouri highlighting Andrew County
Location within the U.S. state of Missouri
Map of the United States highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°59′N 94°48′W / 39.99°N 94.8°W / 39.99; -94.8
Country United States
State Missouri
FoundedJanuary 29, 1841
Named forAndrew Jackson Davis
SeatSavannah
Largest citySavannah
Area
 • Total436 sq mi (1,130 km2)
 • Land433 sq mi (1,120 km2)
 • Water3.7 sq mi (10 km2)  0.9%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total18,135
 • Density42/sq mi (16/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district6th
Websitewww.andrewcounty.org

Andrew County is a county located in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2020 census, the county had a population of 18,135.[1] Its county seat is Savannah.[2] The county was organized January 29, 1841, and named for Andrew Jackson Davis, a lawyer and prominent citizen of St. Louis.[3]

Andrew County is part of the St. Joseph, MO–KS Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Kansas City-Overland Park-Kansas City Combined statistical area.

History[edit]

The following material is inscribed on a plaque erected by the State Historical Society of Missouri and State Highway Commission in 1960, now located by the Andrew County Courthouse:

Andrew County, organized 1841, is one of six counties in the Indian Platte Purchase Territory annexed to Missouri in 1837. Named for Andrew Jackson Davis, a St. Louis editor, the county was first settled in the middle 1830s. Pioneers were from Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, and other parts of Missouri.

Savannah, the county seat, was laid out in 1841. First briefly called Union, it was renamed for Savannah, Georgia. The Platte County Railroad (CB&Q) reached there in 1860, and today's Chicago, Great Western in the late 1880s. The town grew as a shipping point and trading center in the post Civil War era.

Divided during the Civil War, Andrew County sent troops to both sides. In August 1861, 1,500 soldiers from Andrew County and other counties joined the pro-Southern Missouri State Guard at Camp Highly in eastern Andrew County while others joined a large Union cap in adjacent Gentry County. In 1861, Union troops seized "Northwest Democrat," a pro-Southern newspaper, in Savannah and troops from Camp Highly seized the "Plain Dealer," a Union newspaper. Raiding guerrilla bands overran the county through 1863.

Andrew County's glacial plains support fertile livestock, grain, and fruit farms. The One Hundred and Two River, along with the Platte River, are located in the county. Its western border is formed by the Nodaway and Missouri rivers. In 1804 the Lewis and Clark Expedition camped on an island at the mouth of the Nodaway River. Members of fur trader W. Price Hunt's 1811 Astorian expedition wintered near the river's mouth as well.

Among the towns located in Andrew County are Amazonia, once on the Missouri River, now inland, laid out in 1857 near the site of Nodaway City, an early river port; Fillmore, established in 1845; Whitesville, established in 1848; Rochester, established in 1848; Bolckow, established in 1868; Rosendale, established in 1869; Rea, established in 1877; Helena, established in 1878; and Cosby, established in 1882.

The Andrew County Museum & Historical Society celebrates the history of Andrew County through exhibits, programs, publications, and special events. The museum and society collects, preserves, researches, and interprets documents and artifacts to promote the appreciation and preservation of the county's history and bring history to life in Andrew County.[4]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 436 square miles (1,130 km2), of which 433 square miles (1,120 km2) is land and 3.7 square miles (9.6 km2) (0.9%) is water.[5]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18509,433
186011,85025.6%
187015,13727.7%
188016,3187.8%
189016,000−1.9%
190017,3328.3%
191015,282−11.8%
192014,075−7.9%
193013,469−4.3%
194013,015−3.4%
195011,727−9.9%
196011,062−5.7%
197011,9137.7%
198013,90816.7%
199014,6325.2%
200016,49212.7%
201017,2914.8%
202018,1354.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2015[1]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 16,492 people, 6,273 households, and 4,635 families residing in the county. The population density was 38 people per square mile (15/km2). There were 6,662 housing units at an average density of 15 per square mile (6/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 98.38% White, 0.42% Black or African American, 0.34% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.18% from other races, and 0.45% from two or more races. Approximately 0.84% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,273 households, out of which 34.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.70% were married couples living together, 7.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.10% were non-families. 22.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.40% under the age of 18, 7.90% from 18 to 24, 27.60% from 25 to 44, 23.70% from 45 to 64, and 14.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,688, and the median income for a family was $46,067. Males had a median income of $32,955 versus $22,586 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,375. About 6.40% of families and 8.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.50% of those under age 18 and 8.00% of those age 65 or over.

Religion[edit]

According to the Association of Religion Data Archives County Membership Report (2010), Andrew County is sometimes regarded as being on the northern edge of the Bible Belt, with evangelical Protestantism being the most predominant religion. The most predominant denominations among residents in Andrew County who adhere to a religion are Southern Baptists (38.62%), United Methodists (21.14%), and Disciples of Christ (9.86%).

2020 census[edit]

Andrew County Racial Composition[12]
Race Num. Perc.
White (NH) 16,756 92.4%
Black or African American (NH) 138 0.8%
Native American (NH) 40 0.2%
Asian (NH) 89 0.5%
Pacific Islander (NH) 0 0%
Other/Mixed (NH) 721 4%
Hispanic or Latino 391 2.2%

Education[edit]

Public schools[edit]

Public libraries[edit]

  • Rolling Hills Consolidated Library—Savannah Branch[13]

Politics[edit]

Local[edit]

Republicans control politics at the local level in Andrew County. They hold every elected position in the county.

Andrew County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
Assessor Paul Garrison Republican
Circuit Clerk Christy Porter Republican
County Clerk Sarah Miller Republican
Collector Phil Rogers Republican
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Bob Caldwell Republican
Commissioner
(District 1)
Fritz Hegeman Republican
Commissioner
(District 2)
Gary Baumann Republican
Coroner Doug Johnson Republican
Prosecuting Attorney Steven Stevenson Republican
Public Administrator Gary Chambers Republican
Recorder Chanler Williams Republican
Sheriff Grant Gillett Republican
Surveyor F. Shane Terhune Republican
Treasurer Cindy Esely Republican

State[edit]

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2020 73.92% 7,195 24.21% 2,356 1.50% 146
2016 63.22% 5,771 34.79% 3,176 1.98% 181
2012 51.99% 4,301 44.63% 3,692 3.38% 280
2008 48.09% 4,174 49.69% 4,313 2.22% 192
2004 60.70% 5,001 38.15% 3,143 1.15% 95
2000 54.55% 3,943 43.47% 3,142 1.98% 143
1996 37.24% 2,607 60.33% 4,223 2.43% 170
1992 50.00% 3,657 50.00% 3,657 0.00% 0

All of Andrew County is a part of Missouri's 9th District in the Missouri House of Representatives and is represented by Dean Van Schoiack (R-Savannah).

Missouri House of Representatives — District 9 — Andrew County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Dean Van Schoiack 7,449 77.77% +8.35
Democratic Karen Planalp 2,129 22.23 -8.35
Missouri House of Representatives — District 9 — Andrew County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Sheila Solon 5,165 69.42% -30.58
Democratic Bob Bergland 2,275 30.58 +30.58

All of Andrew County is a part of Missouri's 12th District in the Missouri Senate and is currently represented by Dan Hegemen (R-Cosby).

Missouri Senate — District 9 — Andrew County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Dan Hegeman 5,775 77.09% -22.91
Democratic Terry Richard 1,716 22.91% +22.91
Missouri Senate — District 9 — Andrew County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Dan Hegeman 4,228 100.00%

Federal[edit]

All of Andrew County is included in Missouri's 6th Congressional District and is currently represented by Sam Graves (R-Tarkio) in the U.S. House of Representatives. Graves was elected to an eleventh term in 2020 over Democratic challenger Gena Ross.

U.S. House of Representatives – Missouri’s 6th Congressional District – Andrew County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Sam Graves 7,420 76.98% +3.89
Democratic Gena L. Ross 2,002 20.77% -2.39
Libertarian Jim Higgins 217 2.25% -1.50
U.S. House of Representatives – Missouri's 6th Congressional District – Andrew County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Sam Graves 5,529 73.09% -1.62
Democratic Henry Robert Martin 1,752 23.16% +0.78
Libertarian Dan Hogan 284 3.75% +1.77

Andrew County, along with the rest of the state of Missouri, is represented in the U.S. Senate by Josh Hawley (R-Columbia) and Roy Blunt (R-Strafford).

U.S. Senate – Class I – Andrew County (2018)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Josh Hawley 4,919 64.81% +20.26
Democratic Claire McCaskill 2,372 31.25% -16.80
Independent Craig O'Dear 143 1.88%
Libertarian Japheth Campbell 120 1.58% -5.81
Green Jo Crain 36 0.47% +0.47

Blunt was elected to a second term in 2016 over then-Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander.

U.S. Senate — Class III — Andrew County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Roy Blunt 5,610 61.63% +17.08
Democratic Jason Kander 3,122 34.30% -13.75
Libertarian Jonathan Dine 213 2.34% -5.05
Green Johnathan McFarland 83 0.91% +0.91
Constitution Fred Ryman 74 0.81% +0.81

Political culture[edit]

United States presidential election results for Andrew County, Missouri[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 7,255 74.23% 2,351 24.05% 168 1.72%
2016 6,665 72.49% 2,045 22.24% 484 5.26%
2012 5,457 65.42% 2,649 31.76% 235 2.82%
2008 5,279 60.06% 3,345 38.05% 166 1.89%
2004 5,135 62.12% 3,069 37.13% 62 0.75%
2000 4,257 58.52% 2,795 38.42% 222 3.05%
1996 3,281 46.20% 2,807 39.53% 1,013 14.27%
1992 2,652 35.41% 2,675 35.72% 2,162 28.87%
1988 3,407 52.08% 3,108 47.51% 27 0.41%
1984 4,252 63.38% 2,457 36.62% 0 0.00%
1980 3,690 56.14% 2,575 39.18% 308 4.69%
1976 3,130 50.38% 3,042 48.96% 41 0.66%
1972 4,180 71.26% 1,686 28.74% 0 0.00%
1968 3,398 58.97% 2,005 34.80% 359 6.23%
1964 2,594 44.69% 3,211 55.31% 0 0.00%
1960 3,716 63.13% 2,170 36.87% 0 0.00%
1956 3,609 60.13% 2,393 39.87% 0 0.00%
1952 4,452 67.85% 2,104 32.06% 6 0.09%
1948 3,142 54.84% 2,576 44.96% 11 0.19%
1944 3,734 62.29% 2,254 37.60% 7 0.12%
1940 4,384 58.81% 3,059 41.04% 11 0.15%
1936 3,987 51.83% 3,702 48.12% 4 0.05%
1932 2,826 46.04% 3,280 53.44% 32 0.52%
1928 4,243 66.58% 2,118 33.23% 12 0.19%
1924 3,535 55.36% 2,648 41.47% 202 3.16%
1920 3,913 60.86% 2,466 38.36% 50 0.78%
1916 2,087 52.49% 1,853 46.60% 36 0.91%
1912 1,634 42.02% 1,750 45.00% 505 12.99%
1908 2,169 54.09% 1,782 44.44% 59 1.47%
1904 2,306 56.45% 1,691 41.40% 88 2.15%
1900 2,356 53.05% 2,022 45.53% 63 1.42%
1896 2,252 50.26% 2,191 48.90% 38 0.85%
1892 1,834 48.54% 1,505 39.84% 439 11.62%
1888 1,976 52.88% 1,691 45.25% 70 1.87%

At the presidential level, Andrew County is solidly Republican. Andrew County strongly favored Donald Trump in both 2016 and 2020. Bill Clinton was the last Democratic presidential nominee to carry Andrew County in 1992 with a plurality of the vote, and a Democrat hasn't won majority support from the county's voters in a presidential election since Lyndon Johnson in 1964.

Like most rural areas throughout northwest Missouri, voters in Andrew County generally adhere to socially and culturally conservative principles which tend to influence their Republican leanings. Despite Andrew County's longstanding tradition of supporting socially conservative platforms, voters in the county have a penchant for advancing populist causes. In 2018, Missourians voted on a proposition (Proposition A) concerning right to work, the outcome of which ultimately reversed the right to work legislation passed in the state the previous year. 67.18% of Andrew County voters cast their ballots to overturn the law.

Missouri presidential preference primaries[edit]

2020[edit]

The 2020 presidential primaries for both the Democratic and Republican parties were held in Missouri on March 10. On the Democratic side, former Vice President Joe Biden (D-Delaware) both won statewide and carried Andrew County by a wide margin. Biden went on to defeat President Donald Trump in the general election.

Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary – Andrew County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Joe Biden 818 62.35
Democratic Bernie Sanders 415 31.63
Democratic Tulsi Gabbard 18 1.37
Democratic Others/Uncommitted 61 4.65

Incumbent President Donald Trump (R-Florida) faced a primary challenge from former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld, but won both Andrew County and statewide by large margins.

Missouri Republican Presidential Primary – Andrew County (2020)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Donald Trump 1,220 97.52
Republican Bill Weld 3 0.24
Republican Others/Uncommitted 28 2.24

2016[edit]

The 2016 presidential primaries for both the Republican and Democratic parties were held in Missouri on March 15. Businessman Donald Trump (R-New York) narrowly won the state and Andrew County. He went on to win the presidency.

Missouri Republican Presidential Primary – Andrew County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Donald Trump 1,457 41.70
Republican Ted Cruz 1,290 36.92
Republican John Kasich 404 11.56
Republican Marco Rubio 221 6.33
Republican Others/Uncommitted 122 3.49

On the Democratic side, Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) won Andrew County, but former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (D-New York) won statewide by a small margin.

Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary – Andrew County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Bernie Sanders 728 58.38
Democratic Hillary Clinton 498 39.94
Democratic Others/Uncommitted 21 1.68

2012[edit]

The 2012 Missouri Republican Presidential Primary's results were nonbinding on the state's national convention delegates. Voters in Andrew County supported former U.S. Senator Rick Santorum (R-Pennsylvania), who finished first in the state at large, but eventually lost the nomination to former Governor Mitt Romney (R-Massachusetts). Delegates to the congressional district and state conventions were chosen at a county caucus, which selected a delegation favoring Santorum. Incumbent President Barack Obama easily won the Missouri Democratic Primary and renomination. He defeated Romney in the general election.

2008[edit]

In 2008, the Missouri Republican Presidential Primary was closely contested, with Senator John McCain (R-Arizona) prevailing and eventually winning the nomination. However, former Governor Mitt Romney (R-Massachusetts) carried Andrew County

Missouri Republican Presidential Primary – Andrew County (2008)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Mitt Romney 641 35.77
Republican John McCain 501 27.96
Republican Mike Huckabee 484 27.01
Republican Ron Paul 120 6.70
Republican Others/Uncommitted 46 2.56

Then-Senator Hillary Clinton (D-New York) received more votes than any candidate from either party in Andrew County during the 2008 presidential primary. Despite initial reports that Clinton had won Missouri, Barack Obama (D-Illinois), also a Senator at the time, narrowly defeated her statewide and later became that year's Democratic nominee, going on to win the presidency.

Missouri Democratic Presidential Primary – Andrew County (2008)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Hillary Clinton 1,067 56.94
Democratic Barack Obama 746 39.81
Democratic Others/Uncommitted 61 3.25

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Villages[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Andrew County is divided into 10 townships:

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2020 Population and Housing State Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 25, 2021.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. pp. 202.
  4. ^ http://www.andrewcountymuseum.org
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 27, 2010. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  10. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved November 29, 2019.
  11. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  12. ^ "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE – 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) – Andrew County, Missouri".
  13. ^ Breeding, Marshall. "Rolling Hills Consolidated Library -- Savannah Branch". Libraries.org. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 24, 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°59′N 94°48′W / 39.99°N 94.80°W / 39.99; -94.80