Andrew Hammond (ice hockey)

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Andrew Hammond
Born (1988-02-11) February 11, 1988 (age 30)
White Rock, B.C., Canada
Height 6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Weight 216 lb (98 kg; 15 st 6 lb)
Position Goaltender
Catches Left
NHL team (P)
Cur. team
Former teams
Minnesota Wild
Iowa Wild (AHL)
Ottawa Senators
Colorado Avalanche
NHL Draft Undrafted
Playing career 2013–present

Andrew Robert Hammond (born February 11, 1988) is a Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender. He is currently playing with the Iowa Wild in the American Hockey League (AHL) while under contract to the Minnesota Wild of the National Hockey League (NHL).

Playing career[edit]

Amateur[edit]

Hammond played his junior hockey in the British Columbia Hockey League (BCHL). He played one game with the Westside Warriors in the 2006–07 season before being cut by the team and returning to the Grandview Steelers of the Junior "B" Pacific Junior Hockey League to finish the season.[1][2][3] Hammond played 32 games with the Surrey Eagles to start the 2007–08 BCHL season before being traded to the Vernon Vipers for $2,500.[4][2][5] In his final season with the Vipers, the team won the Royal Bank Cup national Junior "A" championship and Hammond posted a 2–0 shutout in the final game.[3]

Hammond attended Bowling Green State University where he played four seasons (2009 to 2013) with the Falcons ice hockey team. In 111 NCAA games, he earned a record of 30–68–13 and was named Bowling Green's Most Valuable Player for both the 2010–11 and 2011–12 seasons.[6] It was at Bowling Green that Hammond's ability to "steal" wins for the Falcons prompted teammate Wade Finegan to start calling the goaltender "Robber," then "Burglar," then simply "Burgs." The nickname finally evolved to "The Hamburglar."[7]

Professional[edit]

The NHL's Ottawa Senators signed Hammond as a free agent goaltender to a two-year, entry-level contract on March 20, 2013.[8][9] He was subsequently assigned to the team's American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate, the Binghamton Senators, where he finished the 2012–13 season.

Hammond attended the Senators' training camp ahead of the 2013–14 season, but was later designated to Binghamton on September 30, 2013.[10][11] He was recalled by Ottawa on February 26, 2014, to replace goaltender Craig Anderson, who was with his wife for the birth of the couple's second child.[12] The next day, Hammond, who backed-up goaltender Robin Lehner, entered a game against the Detroit Red Wings at 5:05 of the second period after Lehner gave up six goals and was pulled. Hammond stopped all 11 shots he faced in the remainder of the game.

Hammond attended Ottawa's training camp ahead of the 2014–15 season, but on September 29, 2014, was again designated to Binghamton to start the season.[13][14] He made his first career NHL start against the Montreal Canadiens at the Canadian Tire Centre on February 18, 2015, after goaltender Robin Lehner was injured in Ottawa's previous game. Hammond earned his first NHL victory in the game, stopping 42 shots in a 4–2 victory, also being named the game's First Star.[15] Two games later, he recorded his first career NHL shutout as the Senators defeated the Anaheim Ducks 3–0,[16] and the next day, he recorded his second consecutive shutout in a 1–0 win over the Los Angeles Kings. Hammond's four consecutive wins marked only the second time of the season that Ottawa won more than two games in a row.[17] On March 2, 2015, Hammond was rewarded for his surprising success as the NHL named him the First Star of the Week.[18] After winning a game against the Carolina Hurricanes in overtime on March 17, Hammond became just the second goaltender in NHL history to allow two goals or fewer in their first 12 starts, a feat matching Hockey Hall of Famer Frank Brimsek's record set during the 1938–39 season with the Boston Bruins.[19]

On April 1, 2015, Hammond was named the NHL's First Star of the Month for March after compiling a 10–1–1 record with a 2.09 goals against average (GAA) and a .930 save percentage, helping the Senators climb to within three points of the final Wild Card spot in the Eastern Conference.[20] On the same day, the Ottawa Chapter of the Professional Hockey Writers' Association announced Hammond as Ottawa's 2015 nominee for the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy, awarded annually to the NHL player who best exemplifies the qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship and dedication to hockey.[21]

Hammond finished the 2014–15 regular season with a record of 20–1–2, helping the Senators clinch a Stanley Cup playoff berth, where they were eventually ousted by the Montreal Canadiens in the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals. Hammond started Ottawa's first two games of the series before being replaced by Craig Anderson for the following four games.

On May 20, shortly after the end of the Senators' season, Hammond was rewarded by signing a three-year, $4.05 million contract extension with Ottawa, carrying an average annual value of $1.35 million.[22] In the following 2015–16 season, Hammond was unable to replicate his previous season success, winning just 7 out of 24 games with the Senators including a 2-game return to the Binghamton Senators.

By the 2016–17 season, Hammond was struggling through a lack of form and hampered through injury. He appeared in just 6 games with Ottawa in a backup role going winless before on February 11, 2017, Hammond's 29th birthday, he was put on waivers by the Ottawa Senators after goaltender Craig Anderson returned from tending to his wife, who was suffering from cancer, and the recent success of backup goaltender Mike Condon. He was reassigned to Binghamton and appeared in just 5 games before suffering a tear in his right labrum requiring season-ending hip surgery on February 27, 2017.[23]

Hammond returned to full health in time for the 2017–18 season, his final year of contract with the Senators. After clearing waivers, he was assigned by Ottawa following training camp to new AHL affiliate, the Belleville Senators on September 29, 2017.[24] On November 5, 2017, Hammond's contract was included by the Senators in a three-way trade with the Colorado Avalanche in exchange for Matt Duchene.[25] With the Avalanche already at a surplus with goaltenders, Hammond was announced to remain with the Belleville Senators on loan from Colorado.[26]

Hammond was recalled by the Avalanche on multiple occasions serving as backup through corresponding injuries to Avalanche duo, Semyon Varlamov and Jonathan Bernier.[27] Before making an appearance with the Avalanche, Hammond was placed on the injured reserve after receiving an errant stick on the bench resulting in a concussion in a game against the Vancouver Canucks.[28] Upon his recovery, Hammond was assigned to the Avalanche's AHL affiliate, the San Antonio Rampage on March 23, 2018.[29]

As a free agent from the Avalanche, Hammond opted to continue his career in the Central Division, agreeing to a one-year, two-way contract to compete for the backup role with the Minnesota Wild on July 1, 2018.[30]

Personal[edit]

Hammond was born in White Rock, British Columbia to Marshall and Sandie Hammond, and grew up in adjacent Surrey.[31] He has a brother, Matt, and a sister, Christine.[31]

Hammond earned the nickname "The Hamburglar" during his university playing career at Bowling Green State University.[32][33] A play on his name, the nickname refers to the McDonald's restaurants' mascot character whose likeness, in the guise of MAD magazines' Alfred E. Neuman, Hammond had painted onto his goalie mask.[34]

Hammond has said that he almost quit hockey on two separate occasions, the first when he was cut after a junior A game in the 2006–07 season, and the second when he was traded from the BCHL's Surrey Eagles mid-season in 2007–08.[3]

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP W L T/OTL MIN GA SO GAA SV% GP W L MIN GA SO GAA SV%
2006–07 Westside Warriors BCHL 1 0 1 0 34 4 0 7.06 .636
2006–07 Grandview Steelers PJHL 28 17 5 3 1568 60 3 2.30 .930 16 9 7 988 44 1 2.67 .921
2007–08 Surrey Eagles BCHL 32 15 14 1 1568 90 2 3.44 .898
2007–08 Vernon Vipers BCHL 9 6 3 0 538 22 1 2.45 .901 7 3 3 412 20 0 2.91 .908
2008–09 Vernon Vipers BCHL 43 27 12 1 2479 95 5 2.30 .912 17 12 5 1082 27 4 1.50 .946
2009–10 Bowling Green Falcons CCHA 19 0 12 2 837 60 0 4.30 .880
2010–11 Bowling Green Falcons CCHA 27 6 17 3 1528 68 2 2.67 .915
2011–12 Bowling Green Falcons CCHA 44 14 24 5 2615 119 2 2.73 .903
2012–13 Bowling Green Falcons CCHA 29 10 15 3 1625 67 3 2.47 .917
2013–14 Binghamton Senators AHL 48 25 19 3 2733 128 1 2.81 .910 4 1 3 265 13 0 2.95 .891
2013–14 Ottawa Senators NHL 1 0 0 0 35 0 0 0.00 1.000
2014–15 Binghamton Senators AHL 25 7 13 2 1369 80 2 3.51 .898
2014–15 Ottawa Senators NHL 24 20 1 2 1411 42 3 1.79 .941 2 0 2 122 7 0 3.44 .914
2015–16 Ottawa Senators NHL 24 7 11 4 1375 61 1 2.65 .914
2015–16 Binghamton Senators AHL 2 0 2 0 119 8 0 4.05 .864
2016–17 Ottawa Senators NHL 6 0 2 0 206 14 0 4.08 .837
2016–17 Binghamton Senators AHL 5 2 3 0 297 16 0 3.24 .884
2017–18 Belleville Senators AHL 18 8 6 2 987 55 0 3.34 .900
2017–18 San Antonio Rampage AHL 1 1 0 0 60 1 0 1.00 .969
2017–18 Colorado Avalanche NHL 1 0 1 0 59 2 0 2.07 .939 3 1 1 138 6 0 2.63 .933
NHL totals 56 27 15 6 3,092 119 4 2.31 .923 5 1 3 260 13 0 3.00 .924

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Andrew Hammond BCHL Statistics". British Columbia Hockey League. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved March 16, 2015.
  2. ^ a b Greenizan, Nick (February 18, 2015). "Semiahmoo Minor Hockey alum to make first NHL start". Surrey Leader. Retrieved March 16, 2015.
  3. ^ a b c Woodley, Kevin (March 6, 2015). "Senators goalie Hammond making hometown proud". National Hockey League. Retrieved March 6, 2015.
  4. ^ "Andrew Hammond PJHL Statistics". Pacific Junior Hockey League. Retrieved March 16, 2015.
  5. ^ Brennan, Don (March 5, 2015). "Senators goalie Andrew Hammond led junior team to RBC Cup". Ottawa Sun. Retrieved March 16, 2015.
  6. ^ "Goalie Hammond named team MVP at Falcons' end of the year banquet". The BG News. 2012-04-01. Retrieved 2015-03-15.
  7. ^ "Andrew 'The Hamburglar' Hammond: 5 things to know". CBC Sports. March 16, 2015.
  8. ^ "Senators sign goaltender Andrew Hammond to a two-year contract". Ottawa Senators. March 20, 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013.
  9. ^ "Andrew Hammond signs his first NHL contract". Twitter. March 20, 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013.
  10. ^ "Senators announce 2013–14 training camp roster". Ottawa Senators. September 9, 2013. Retrieved March 17, 2015.
  11. ^ "Ottawa Senators reduce roster to 22 players". Ottawa Senators. September 30, 2013. Retrieved March 17, 2015.
  12. ^ "Ottawa Senators recall Andrew Hammond to back up Robin Lehner". National Hockey League. February 26, 2014. Archived from the original on February 19, 2015. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  13. ^ "Senators announce 2014–15 training camp roster". Ottawa Senators. September 16, 2014. Retrieved March 17, 2015.
  14. ^ "Senators reduce 2014–15 training camp roster by 21 players". Ottawa Senators. September 29, 2014. Retrieved March 17, 2015.
  15. ^ "Hammond leads Sens over Habs in first start". The Sports Network. February 18, 2015. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  16. ^ "Senators go Duck hunting, blank Anaheim". Ottawa Sun. February 20, 2015. Retrieved February 20, 2015.
  17. ^ "Hammond, Senators blank Ducks". The Sports Network. February 23, 2015. Retrieved February 23, 2015.
  18. ^ "Hammond, Subban and Malkin named stars of week". National Hockey League. March 2, 2015. Retrieved March 2, 2015.
  19. ^ "Andrew Hammond secures NHL goaltending record, Senators claim crucial OT victory". Ottawa Citizen. 2015-03-18. Retrieved 2015-03-18.
  20. ^ "Hammond, Hudler, Dubnyk named stars for March". NHL Public Relations. April 1, 2015. Retrieved April 1, 2015.
  21. ^ "Hammond nominated for Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy". Ottawa Senators. 2015-04-01. Retrieved 2015-04-01.
  22. ^ NHL.com (May 20, 2015). "Hammond, Senators agree on three-year contract". NHL.com. Retrieved May 20, 2015.
  23. ^ "After suffering hip injury, Goalie Andrew Hammond out for season". Ottawa Citizen. 2017-02-27. Retrieved 2017-02-27.
  24. ^ "Andrew Hammond re-assigned to Belleville". Belleville Senators. 2017-09-29. Retrieved 2017-09-29.
  25. ^ "Avalanche acquires four players and three picks in three-team trade". Colorado Avalanche. 2017-11-05. Retrieved 2017-11-05.
  26. ^ James Gordon (2017-11-06). "Andrew Hammond will remain with the Belleville Senators". Twitter. Retrieved 2017-11-06.
  27. ^ "Hammond returns to Colorado". Belleville Senators. 2018-02-17. Retrieved 2018-02-17.
  28. ^ "Avalanche's Andrew Hammond dealing with head injury". CBS Sports. 2018-02-28. Retrieved 2018-02-28.
  29. ^ "Goalie shuffling between Avs and Rampage". Twitter. 2018-03-23. Retrieved 2018-03-23.
  30. ^ "Wild, Hammond agree to two-way deal". Minnesota Wild. 2018-07-01. Retrieved 2018-07-01.
  31. ^ a b "Andrew Hammond – 2011–12 Ice Hockey". Bowling Green Falcons. Retrieved March 17, 2015.
  32. ^ Cantlon, Kyle (April 21, 2018). "Return of 'The Hamburglar': the storyline we didn't know we needed". sports.yahoo.com. Retrieved April 22, 2018.
  33. ^ Traikos, Michael (March 11, 2015). "Meet the Ottawa Senators' Andrew Hammond (a.k.a. 'The Hamburglar'), the unheralded goalie who has helped put his team back in the playoff race". The National Post. Retrieved April 22, 2018.
  34. ^ Clinton, Jared (August 19, 2015). "ANDREW HAMMOND PAYS TRIBUTE TO 'BUTTERFLY CHILD' ON NEW MASK". hehockeynews.com. Retrieved April 23, 2018.

External links[edit]