Andrew Jackson Warner

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Andrew Jackson Warner (March 17, 1833 – September 4, 1910), also known as A. J. Warner, was a prominent architect in Rochester, New York.

Warner was born in New Haven, Connecticut and educated at Guilford Academy in Guilford, Connecticut. In 1847 he came to Rochester as an apprentice to one of his uncles, Merwin Austin, for whom he worked as a draftsman. He was soon made a partner in his uncle's business, which as Austin & Warner existed from about 1855-1858. Warner then established an independent practice until 1867 when he partnered with Charles Coots under the firm name of Andrew J. Warner & Co. After this he had an independent practice, then from 1875-1877 partnered with James Goold Cutler (1848-1927) in a firm known as Warner & Cutler.

Warner was the father of Rochester architect John Foster Warner (commonly called J. Foster Warner (1859-1937)).[1][2] Warner died in Rochester on September 4, 1910, and is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery.

Selected works[edit]

References[edit]

  • Susanne Keaveney Maruoka, The architecture of Andrew Jackson Warner in Rochester, New York, University of Rochester. Dept. of Fine Arts, 1965.
  • Richard O. Reisem, Mt. Hope: America's First Municipal Victorian Cemetery, Landmark Soc. of Western New York, 1994, page 18. ISBN 978-0-9641706-3-6.
  • Francis R. Kowsky, Buffalo architecture: a guide, MIT Press, 1981, pages 64–65. ISBN 978-0-262-52063-8.
  1. ^ Monroe County (NY) Library System - Rochester Images - Biographical Information
  2. ^ a b c d Kathleen LaFrank (September 1991). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Brick Presbyterian Church Complex". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2009-10-01. 
  3. ^ "National Register of Historic Places". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 2/23/15 through 2/27/15. National Park Service. 2015-03-06. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  5. ^ unknown (n.d.). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Warsaw Downtown Historic District". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2013-04-20. 
  6. ^ "Cultural Resource Information System (CRIS)" (Searchable database). New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2016-02-01. [permanent dead link] Note: This includes Susan Gordon Lawson and Jennifer Walkowski (December 2014). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Union and State Streets Historic District" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-02-01. , Supplemental information, and Accompanying photographs
  7. ^ "Cultural Resource Information System (CRIS)" (Searchable database). New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2016-02-01. [permanent dead link] Note: This includes Katie Eggers Comeau and Jennifer Walkowski (June 2015). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Holley Village Historic District" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-02-01.  and Accompanying photographs

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