Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness (album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness
Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedOctober 14, 2014
RecordedDecember 2013–April 2014
Genre
Length37:11
LabelVanguard
Producer
Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness chronology
The Pop Underground
(2013)
Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness
(2014)
Zombies on Broadway
(2017)
Singles from Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness
  1. "Cecilia and the Satellite"
    Released: August 12, 2014
  2. "High Dive"
    Released: September 2, 2014
  3. "Canyon Moon"
    Released: September 23, 2014
  4. "See Her on the Weekend"
    Released: September 30, 2014

Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness is the self-titled debut album released by American indie pop act Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness, led by singer, songwriter, and pianist Andrew McMahon. The album was released on October 14, 2014, through Vanguard Records, led by the first single "Cecilia and the Satellite", officially released August 12, 2014.

Background[edit]

The third Jack's Mannequin record People and Things was released in October 2011 through Warner Bros. imprint Sire Records.[1] The album was made between 2009–2011,[2] during which time there was a leadership change at Warner Bros. As a result, the album was recorded on thee separate occasions.[3] Throughout the making of the album, vocalist/pianist Andrew McMahon felt that it was time to move on to another project.[4] He considered it the final part of the Jack's Mannequin story[5] that was initially meant to only last for a single record.[6] In February 2012, McMahon started dropping suggestions that the band's break up was imminent.[7] Sometime afterwards, McMahon ended his partnership with Warner Bros. due to creative differences,[8] and left his management. He took a step back from the music industry, moved out of Los Angeles[9] to San Clemente,[10] and spent his time focussing on his marriage, mental health and confidence.[3]

In September, "Wrecking Ball Heart" was posted online, a track that McMahon viewed as both the final Jack's Mannequin song and his first solo song.[11] Jack's Mannequin played their final show in November.[12] Following this, McMahon spent the next few months in studios doing pop writing[12] and writing songs for the TV show Smash.[11] After this, he worked on songs for a solo EP;[12] The Pop Underground EP was released in April 2013.[13] McMahon then earned a support slot for O.A.R. on their headlining US tour between June and August.[14] Around this time, McMahon received an Emmy nomination for Smash and found new management,[3] who suggested he take time off from touring to work on new songs.[15] Following this, he stayed alone in a cabin in Topanga Canyon, near Los Angeles, California,[3] in August.[16] He spent the weekdays writing for his debut solo album, and the weekends at home with his pregnant wife.[4] He worked 10 hours per day, sat at his piano,[3] and wrote batches of songs every week.[15] He collectively spent two months in the cabin.[3]

Production[edit]

Following his time in Topanga Canyon, McMahon started working with producer Mike Viola in his Echo Park garage studio.[9] McMahon took what he enjoyed while making the EP, namely the concept for getting into a studio and working on something in a timely manner, and applied it to the album's sessions. In December 2013, McMahon and Viola came up with a demo of "High Dive". The demo featured piano, programmed drums and guitar; after muting the guitar track, the pair were surprised at the clarity of the piano against the rest of the recording. It dawned on the pair that they could work around the production without needing to have too many layers to focus on. It subsequently became the production template for the rest of the album.[16]

A friend of McMahon's liked the work of James Flannigan, and suggested that McMahon work with him. The two of them, alongside Flannigan's writing partner Anders Grahn, collaborated in a room in Hollywood.[16] After an impressive session, Flannigan was invited to help complete the album with McMahon and Viola. The trio worked in a variety of production areas and studios all over Los Angeles to finish off the album.[9] Partway through the sessions[17] McMahon's daughter Cecilia was born in February 2014.[18] In April, McMahon revealed he was in the studio.[19]

Composition[edit]

Similar to The Pop Underground, McMahon wanted to merge contemporary instrumentation, such as synthesizers and programming, with classic instrumentation, such as piano, bass and drums.[16] He purposely didn't want any guitar, which helped establish its own sound.[20] While working on the album, McMahon said he was influenced by Daft Punk, LCD Soundsystem, M83 and Passion Pit.[21] The album's title refers to McMahon being out of the major label system and a band, and his subsequent attempts to find his way back.[3] The album discusses where McMahon was in his life at the time, and tackles some themes from Jack's Mannequin's Everything in Transit (2005), namely returning to southern California and starting a new life.[22] McMahon wrote some material from a Sliding Doors (1998)-esque perspective: “I found myself asking, ‘What would have come next if I hadn’t encountered that bizarre chapter of my disrupted 20s?’"[9]

"Canyon Moon" is about a girl leaving Los Angeles.[4] McMahon co-wrote the track with Sam Hollander and Better Than Ezra frontman Kevin Griffin, who McMahon had known since the early days of touring with Something Corporate.[22] "Cecilia and the Satellite" was written with the foresight that him and his wife were expecting their first child.[23] It was one of the last songs written for the album,[9] and summarizes McMahon's life up to that point.[23] McMahon wrote "High Dive" from the viewpoint of him and his wife splitting up and her moving on.[9] It is about loving a person "so much that you'll take anything they're willing to give even if it's not enough."[24] McMahon's weekend trips to see his wife inspired the creation of "See Her on the Weekend". It talks about long-distance love and occupying time until Friday.[3] "Halls" talks about self-sabotaging behaviour in favour of helping one's career.[9] "Rainy Girl" was the first song written for the album. It talks about McMahon being enthusiastic about meeting his child.[22] "Maps for the Getaway" is about going for broke.[25]

Release[edit]

In July, McMahon began performing under the moniker Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness. He explained that the wilderness part of the name was "mostly an abstract one. Since putting Jack’s [Mannequin] behind me, I have forced myself into strange spaces seeking new stimulus."[26] The name was taken from a journal that McMahon had started after moving out of Los Angeles titled In the Wilderness.[22] Later that month, he played a few headlining shows with support from My Body Sings Electric and Wild Party.[27] "Cecilia and the Satellite" was made available for streaming on July 18 via McMahon's SoundCloud profile.[23] Following this, McMahon supported Gavin DeGraw and Matt Nathanson on their co-headlining US tour in July and August.[28] On August 12, Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness was announced for release in October. In addition, the album's artwork was revealed,[29] and "Cecilia and the Satellite" was released as a single.[30] "High Dive" was released as a single on September 2,[31] as was "Canyon Moon" on September 23.[32] "See Her on the Weekend" was made available for streaming through MTV on September 29,[33] before being released as a single the following day.[34]

Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness was made available for streaming on October 6 through Billboard's website,[4] before being released on October 14 through independent label Vanguard Records.[29] Following this, McMahon went on a headlining US tour in October and November.[35] On December 5, a music video was released for "Cecilia and the Satellite",[36] directed by Olivier Agostini.[37] It was followed by a "Day in the Life" video on February 25, 2015, again directed by Agostini.[38] This version features McMahon, his wife and his daughter spending time together while on tour, before watching McMahon perform at a show.[39] On October 2, McMahon performed "Cecilia and the Satellite" on Today.[40] "High Dive" was released to alternative radio stations on October 13.[41] The Canyons EP was released on November 20,[42] and featured stripped-down versions of "Maps for the Getaway", "Cecilia and the Satellite", "Halls" and "High Dive", produced by John Alagia.[43] On December 7, a music video was released for "High Dive", directed by Rich Ragsdale.[44]

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
SourceRating
Metacritic78/100[45]
Review scores
SourceRating
AbsolutePunk8.5/10[46]
AllMusic3.5/5 stars[47]
Melodic4/5 stars [48]
PopMatters6/10 stars[49]
Sputnikmusic3/5[50]

At Metacritic, which assigns a weighted mean rating out of 100, the album received an average score of 78, based on 4 reviews, which indicates "generally favorable reviews".[45]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Andrew McMahon.

No.TitleAdditional writer(s)Length
1."Canyon Moon"Kevin Griffin, Sam Hollander3:03
2."Cecilia and the Satellite"James Flannigan, Anders Grahn3:43
3."High Dive"Mike Viola3:47
4."All Our Lives"Andrew Goldstein, Brian Lee3:50
5."See Her on the Weekend" 3:49
6."Black and White Movies"Viola4:04
7."Driving Through a Dream"Viola4:11
8."Halls"Viola3:48
9."Rainy Girl"Viola2:59
10."Maps for the Getaway"Flannigan, Viola3:57
Total length:37:11

Personnel[edit]

  • Andrew McMahon – piano, vocals, keyboards
  • James Flannigan - programming, keyboards, backing vocals
  • Mike Viola - additional programming, bass, backing vocals, guitar (for "Black and White Movies")
  • Jake Sinclair - additional programming
  • Zac Clark - programming, keyboards, and tambourine (for "See Her on the Weekend")
  • Jay McMillan - programming, drums, and percussion (for "See Her on the Weekend")

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (2014) Peak
position
US Billboard 200[53] 21
US Digital Albums (Billboard)[54] 11
US Independent Albums (Billboard)[55] 3
US Top Alternative Albums (Billboard)[56] 4

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zaleksi, Annie (August 30, 2011). "Exclusive: Jack's Mannequin album trailer for "People And Things"". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on October 21, 2018. Retrieved October 21, 2018.
  2. ^ Graff, Gary (August 30, 2011). "New Jack's Mannequin Album Is a Do-Over". Billboard. Archived from the original on 2017-02-18. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Lewis, Casey (August 28, 2014). "Andrew McMahon's Life After Pop Punk". BuzzFeed. Archived from the original on 2018-10-29. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  4. ^ a b c d Payne, Chris (October 6, 2014). "Exclusive Premiere: Hear Andrew McMahon In the Wilderness' Heartwarming New Album". Billboard. Archived from the original on 2017-08-20. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  5. ^ Wippsson, Johan (May 1, 2012). "Jacks Mannequin Premieres Video For "Release Me"". Melodic. Archived from the original on 2012-05-05. Retrieved October 21, 2018.
  6. ^ Sivero, Tyler (November 14, 2011). "Interview: Andrew McMahon of Jack's Mannequin". USD Student Media. Archived from the original on 2018-07-24. Retrieved October 27, 2018.
  7. ^ Dwyer, Alisa (May 10, 2013). "Andrew McMahon: Music Industry's Very Own Phoenix". Campus Circle. Archived from the original on October 28, 2018. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  8. ^ Schillaci, Sophie (November 11, 2012). "Jack's Mannequin's Andrew McMahon on the End of an Era and How StubHub Sabotaged His Last Show". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on 2018-10-29. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g "Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness Bio | Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness Career". MTV. Archived from the original on October 5, 2014. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  10. ^ Bose, Lilledeshan (April 8, 2015). "Andrew McMahon Personifies Dad Rock…In a Good Way". OC Weekly. Archived from the original on 2018-10-22. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  11. ^ a b Moser, John J. (January 28, 2013). "Andrew McMahon looks to solo career after 'completion' of Jack's Mannequin". The Morning Call. p. 2. Archived from the original on 2018-10-28. Retrieved October 27, 2018.
  12. ^ a b c Moser, John J. (January 28, 2013). "Andrew McMahon looks to solo career after 'completion' of Jack's Mannequin". The Morning Call. p. 1. Archived from the original on 2015-07-07. Retrieved October 27, 2018.
  13. ^ "The Pop Underground - EP". iTunes. Archived from the original on August 8, 2013. Retrieved October 27, 2018.
  14. ^ Lipshutz, Jason (April 25, 2013). "Andrew McMahon, 'After The Fire': Exclusive Song Premiere". Billboard. Archived from the original on 2013-04-28. Retrieved October 27, 2018.
  15. ^ a b Zaleski, Annie (September 13, 2013). ""It's definitely an adventure:" Andrew McMahon talks his Emmy nomination and new material". Alternative Press. p. 2. Retrieved October 30, 2018.
  16. ^ a b c d Moser, John J. (January 22, 2015). "Interviewing Andrew McMahon: Jack's Mannequin, Something Corporate singer's solo future In The Wilderness for now". The Morning Call. Archived from the original on 2018-02-22. Retrieved October 31, 2018.
  17. ^ McElwee, Steve (January 16, 2015). "Tales from the wilderness: Andrew McMahon's life story influences solo musical career". Centre Daily Times. Archived from the original on 2018-02-22. Retrieved October 30, 2018.
  18. ^ Bologna, Caroline (March 3, 2015). "Singer-Songwriter Andrew McMahon Honors Wife And Baby In Sweet New Music Video". HuffPost. Retrieved October 30, 2018.
  19. ^ Crane, Matt (April 18, 2014). "Andrew McMahon (Something Corporate, Jack's Mannequin) announces headlining dates". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on 2018-10-30. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  20. ^ "Andrew McMahon balances "the beauty of a life that is lived both well and hard"". Alternative Press. February 9, 2017. Retrieved November 6, 2018.
  21. ^ Sariyan, Danielle (June 29, 2016). "The Former Self-Proclaimed, "Garage Band King" Andrew McMahon Has Found His Greatest Success "In The Wilderness"". The Aquarian Weekly. Archived from the original on 2018-02-22. Retrieved October 30, 2018.
  22. ^ a b c d Zaleski, Annie (September 18, 2014). ""It was almost like picking up where I left off"—Andrew McMahon on his new project and fatherhood". Alternative Press. Retrieved October 30, 2018.
  23. ^ a b c "Cecilia and the Satellite". Andrew McMahon. July 18, 2014. Archived from the original on 2014-07-21. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  24. ^ Futterman, Erica (September 2, 2014). "Listen To Andrew McMahon's End-Of-Summer Soundtrack, "High Dive"". BuzzFeed. Archived from the original on 2018-10-30. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  25. ^ Amato, Sara (November 5, 2015). "Andrew McMahon talks recovery, his legacy and why he doesn't play 'Konstantine' in concert". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on October 15, 2018. Retrieved October 24, 2018.
  26. ^ Crane, Matt (July 16, 2014). "Andrew McMahon (Something Corporate, Jack's Mannequin) performs two new songs". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on 2018-10-29. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  27. ^ Bird, Michele (May 23, 2014). "Andrew McMahon announces support for summer tour dates". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on 2018-10-29. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  28. ^ Crane, Matt (April 28, 2014). "Andrew McMahon (Something Corporate, Jack's Mannequin) announces more headlining dates". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on 2018-10-29. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  29. ^ a b Crane, Matt (August 12, 2014). "Andrew McMahon In The Wilderness details new album". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on 2018-10-29. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  30. ^ "Cecilia and the Satellite– Single by Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness". iTunes Store. Apple. Archived from the original on 2014-08-22. Retrieved August 12, 2014.
  31. ^ "High Dive - Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness | Release Info". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 2018-10-29. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  32. ^ "Canyon Moon - Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness | Release Info". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 2017-02-15. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  33. ^ Crane, Matt (September 29, 2014). "Andrew McMahon In The Wilderness releases new song, "See Her On The Weekend"". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on 2018-10-30. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  34. ^ "See Her On the Weekend - Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness | Release Info". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 2018-10-29. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  35. ^ Wippsson, Johan (August 15, 2012). "Andrew McMahon In The Wilderness Announces Album Release Date & Cover Art". Melodic. Archived from the original on 2018-10-29. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  36. ^ Crane, Matt (December 5, 2014). "Andrew McMahon In The Wilderness releases "Cecilia And The Satellite" video". Alternative Press. Archived from the original on 2018-10-29. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  37. ^ McMahon, Andrew (December 5, 2014). Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness - Cecilia And The Satellite. Retrieved October 29, 2018 – via YouTube.
  38. ^ McMahon, Andrew (February 25, 2015). Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness - Cecilia And The Satellite (Day In The Life Edition). Archived from the original on 2017-05-06. Retrieved October 29, 2018 – via YouTube.
  39. ^ Interrante, Scott (April 28, 2015). "Driving Through a Dream with Andrew McMahon". PopMatters. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  40. ^ Bazley, John (October 2, 2015). "Andrew McMahon performs "Cecilia And The Satellite" on 'Today'—watch". Alternative Press. Retrieved November 1, 2018.
  41. ^ "Alternative Future Releases". All Access Music Group. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  42. ^ "The Canyons - Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness | Release Info". AllMusic. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  43. ^ The Canyons EP (sleeve). Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness. Vanguard Records. 2016 [originally released in 2015]. VAN-39020-01.
  44. ^ McMahon, Andrew (December 7, 2015). Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness - High Dive (Music Video). Archived from the original on 2018-06-28. Retrieved October 29, 2018 – via YouTube.
  45. ^ a b "Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness - Andrew McMahon In the Wilderness". Metacritic. Archived from the original on 2014-10-18. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  46. ^ Manning, Craig. "Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness - Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness - Album Review". AbsolutePunk. Archived from the original on October 14, 2014. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  47. ^ Monger, James Christopher (October 14, 2014). "Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness - Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness, Andrew McMahon | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 2014-10-23. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  48. ^ Wippsson, Johan (October 14, 2014). "Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness - Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness". Melodic. Archived from the original on October 28, 2018. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  49. ^ McGuire, Colin (February 17, 2015). "Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness: Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness". PopMatters. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  50. ^ SowingSeason (October 14, 2014). "Review: Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness - Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness". Sputnikmusic. Archived from the original on 2014-10-17. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  51. ^ "Andrew McMahon In The Wilderness/アンドリュー・マクマホン・イン・ザ・ウィルダネス - TOWER RECORDS ONLINE". Tower Records. Archived from the original on 16 September 2014. Retrieved 16 September 2014.
  52. ^ "Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness (Deluxe Edition) by Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness on iTunes". iTunes. Archived from the original on 2015-11-26. Retrieved 20 November 2015.
  53. ^ "Andrew McMahon Chart History (Billboard 200)". Billboard. Retrieved October 24, 2014.
  54. ^ "Andrew McMahon Chart History (Digital Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved October 24, 2014.
  55. ^ "Andrew McMahon Chart History (Independent Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved October 24, 2014.
  56. ^ "Andrew McMahon Chart History (Top Alternative Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved October 29, 2014.