Andrew Rader

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Andrew A. Rader
Andrew Rader Headshot.jpg
2019 photo of Andrew Rader[1]
NationalityAmerican
Alma materMassachusetts Institute of Technology
Scientific career
ThesisMotion perception with conflicting or congruent visual and vestibular cues (2009)
Doctoral advisorsCharles M. Oman and Daniel M. Merfeld

Andrew Alan Rader is a Canadian author and aerospace engineer.[2] Rader was the Season 2 winner of the Discovery series, Canada's Greatest Know-It-All.[3] Originally from Ottawa, Canada, Rader now works for SpaceX as a Mission Manager in Los Angeles.[4]

Education[edit]

Rader attended Carleton University from 1999 until 2005, receiving bachelor's and master's degrees in aerospace engineering there.[4] He spent the following four years studying aeronautics and astronautics engineering at MIT, specializing in long-duration spaceflight, and receiving his Ph.D. in 2009.[5][6]

Career[edit]

Rader worked as a research engineer at Canada's National Research Council from 2003 to 2005. After moving to the US, he worked as a research engineer at MIT from 2005 to 2010.[7]

After graduating from MIT, Rader worked as a Spacecraft Systems Engineer at COM DEV from 2010 to 2014. In 2014, Rader moved to Los Angeles to take a job at SpaceX where he now holds the position of Mission Manager.[8]

Rader was a candidate for the Canadian Astronaut Corps in 2009 and 2017.[8][9] He wrote about the experience in an article for Motherboard called "What It's Like to Be in the Running to Be an Astronaut." He was also in consideration for a one-way mission to Mars as part of the Mars One project in 2014.[10] Natalie Angier interviewed him about the process for a New York Times story entitled A One-Way Trip to Mars? Many Would Sign Up.[11]

Books[edit]

Rader self-published his first five books via successful crowdfunding campaigns on Kickstarter. His first book to be released by a major publisher is the non-fiction chronicle of human exploration, Beyond the Known: How Exploration Created the Modern World and Will Take us to the Stars, released by Simon & Schuster on November 12, 2019.[12]

His non-fiction books for adults include:

  • 2019 - Beyond the Known: How Exploration Created the Modern World and Will Take us to the Stars
  • 2014 - Leaving Earth: Why One-way to Mars Makes Sense

He is also the author of a series of science books for children:

  • 2015 - Epic Space Adventure, successfully funded via Kickstarter on November 30, 2015
  • 2016 - Mars Rover Rescue, successfully funded via Kickstarter on November 30, 2016
  • 2017 - Rocket Science, successfully funded via Kickstarter on December 5, 2017
  • 2018 - Europa Excursion, successfully funded via Kickstarter on December 8, 2018[2]

Selected research publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rader, Andrew (2019-11-12). Beyond the Known. ISBN 9781982123536.
  2. ^ a b "Andrew Rader | Author | Game Designer | SpaceX Mission Manager". Andrew Rader. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  3. ^ "Episode 8". Canada's Greatest Know It All. Season 2. Episode 8. March 4, 2013. Retrieved September 19, 2020.
  4. ^ a b "Astronaut candidate's profile". www.asc-csa.gc.ca. 2017-02-01. Retrieved 2020-01-02.
  5. ^ "Exploration Created the Modern World & Will Take Us to the Stars". MIT Club of San Diego. June 25, 2020.
  6. ^ McGonegal, Joe (October 22, 2014). "Meet Elon Musk's Top MIT Talent". MIT CAlumni.
  7. ^ "LinkedIn". LinkedIn.
  8. ^ a b "Astronaut candidate's profile". www.asc-csa.gc.ca. 2017-02-01. Retrieved 2019-09-23.
  9. ^ "Newest Canadian Astronaut: An MIT Alum?". alum.mit.edu. Retrieved 2019-09-23.
  10. ^ July 30, Marie-Danielle Smith Updated; 2014 (2014-07-30). "Ottawa's Andrew Rader shortlisted for Mars One journey | Ottawa Citizen". Retrieved 2019-09-23.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  11. ^ A One-Way Trip to Mars? Many Would Sign Up
  12. ^ "Andrew Rader". Andrew Rader. Retrieved 2019-09-23.