Andrew Sabiston

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Andrew Sabiston
BornAndrew Sabiston
(1965-02-08) February 8, 1965 (age 53)
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
NationalityCanadian
OccupationActor, voice actor, writer, series developer, story edtior
Years active1981–present

Andrew Sabiston (born February 8, 1965) is a Canadian actor, voice actor, writer, series developer and executive story editor who works in the children's/youth television market with over 900 episodes to his credit. His mother is artist Carole Sabiston.[1]

An early start as a stage actor in his childhood led to being cast in Paul Almond's film Ups and Downs alongside classmate Leslie Hope, filmed at their high school, St Michaels University School.[2] He then landed a starring role on the multiple award-winning Disney/CBC television series The Edison Twins which ran for six seasons, beginning the year he graduated,[3] and was widely syndicated. Sabiston's first writing credit ("Story Idea by") was in the "Home Sweet Home" episode of The Edison Twins, which aired in 1984.

Many of the programs in which he has been involved are multiple award-winners airing globally and include: Ranger Rob, Dot, Little Bear; Max & Ruby, Mike the Knight, Arthur, Justin Time, Trucktown, Bo On the Go, My Big Big Friend, The Moblees, Little Charmers, The Adventures of Napkin Man, Donkey Kong Country, The Neverending Story, Star Wars: Droids, Super Mario World, Harry and His Bucket Full of Dinosaurs, Babar and the Adventures of Badou, and The Travels of the Young Marco Polo. A 2015 Canadian Screen Award Nominee for Best Writing,[4] he also had three of his scripts nominated for Best Series in various categories in the 2015 Youth Media Alliance Awards.[5]

For the theatre, he is the lyricist and co-bookwriter with high-school acquaintance Timothy Williams for the musical Napoleon which was first produced in 1994 at The Elgin Theatre in Toronto.[6] It was subsequently produced in 2000 at The Shaftesbury Theatre in London. In 2009 a new version, with a new book and several new musical numbers was first presented in concert at Talk Is Free Theatre in Barrie, Ontario[7][8] under the direction of Richard Ouzounian. This marked the beginning of a reimagining of the musical as an intimate, behind-the-scenes political drama with a cast half the size of the original productions and a new book and score. The new Napoleon debuted at the New York Musical Theatre Festival in July 2015.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.timescolonist.com/victoria-pair-s-napoleon-going-to-new-york-1.1864895
  2. ^ http://www.timescolonist.com/big-picture-filmmaker-paul-almond-was-honorary-victorian-1.1973808
  3. ^ https://news.smus.ca/2015/04/27/smus-in-the-news-andrew-sabiston-82-and-timothy-williams-83/
  4. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on January 15, 2015. Retrieved 2015-01-20.
  5. ^ http://kidscreen.com/2015/04/02/yma-awards-of-excellence-nominees-announced/
  6. ^ Mel Atkey (2006) Broadway North Natural Heritage Books pages 26,221,223,224,248,265 ISBN 1-897045-08-5
  7. ^ "Welcome to Talk Is Free Theatre – Barrie, Ontario". Tift.ca. Retrieved September 11, 2011.
  8. ^ "Napoleon, 1994 Canadian Musical, Gets New Concert in Ontario; Adam Brazier Stars". Playbill. Retrieved September 11, 2011.

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