Andrew Yang 2020 presidential campaign

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Andrew Yang 2020 presidential campaign
Andrew Yang 2020 logo.svg
Campaign2020 United States presidential election (Democratic Party primaries)
CandidateAndrew Yang
Founder of Venture for America,
AffiliationDemocratic Party
StatusAnnounced November 6, 2017
HeadquartersNew York City, New York
SloganHumanity First
Make America Think Harder (Math)
Not Left, Not Right, Forward
Website
www.yang2020.com

The 2020 presidential campaign of Andrew Yang, an attorney and entrepreneur and the founder of Venture for America, began on November 6, 2017, when Yang filed with the Federal Election Commission to participate in the Democratic primaries.[1] Yang's unorthodox campaign strategy and platform have attracted attention, especially for his heavy reliance upon Internet-based campaigning and his idea of a "Freedom Dividend", which is a form of Universal Basic Income.[2][3][4] The other two pillars of Yang's campaign are Medicare for All, and "Human-Centered Capitalism".[5] Over 100 policy proposals are listed on Yang's website.[6][7]

Campaign[edit]

Yang campaigning in New Hampshire in January 2018

Yang's candidacy began on November 6, 2017.[1] His campaign has been called a "longshot" by many in the media, such as Fox News and Vox.[8][9][10][11] He is running on the slogan "Humanity First".[12] If nominated, he would become the first Asian American to serve as any major party's presidential candidate, and if elected, he would become the first Asian American president.[13]

In a press release on April 19, 2018, Andrew Yang announced that he would be personally giving one resident of New Hampshire $1,000/month in 2019 to show the effectiveness of his Universal Basic Income policy, the "Freedom Dividend".[14] He announced that he will be doing the same thing in Iowa in 2019.[15] On August 10, 2018, Yang was a keynote speaker at the largest Democratic fundraiser in Iowa, the Iowa Democratic Wing Ding.[16] In 2018, he made seven trips to Iowa and six trips to New Hampshire, the first two states to vote in the primaries.[17][18][19][20]

Nationwide opinion polling for the 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries for Andrew Yang

Initially viewed by many in the media as a longshot candidate with little chance of gaining significant traction, Yang's campaign began to increase in visibility in early 2019, as Yang appeared on noted outlets such as The Joe Rogan Experience, The Breakfast Club and Tucker Carlson Tonight.[21][22] Several media sources have also attributed Yang's rise in notability to his large group of online supporters, who informally refer to themselves as the "Yang Gang" and have made a large number of memes about Yang and his campaign.[2][23]

According to the media, Yang has a large following on /pol/, a forum on 4chan that is notorious for its alt-right politics,[24] though Yang himself has denounced any support from the alt-right.[25] Yang said that he is “getting support from quarters (he) wouldn’t have expected” in a March 2019 interview with The New York Times; regarding support from the alt-right in particular, he said “It’s uncomfortable. They’re antithetical to everything I stand for.”[23]

On March 11, Yang announced on Twitter that he surpassed the fundraising threshold of 65,000 donors, which qualified him to participate in the first round of Democratic primary debates.[26] Yang participated in the second night of the first primary debate.[27]

Policies[edit]

Yang's platform is based around three major concepts, namely Universal Basic Income, Medicare for All, and "Human-Centered Capitalism".[5] His platform also includes numerous other proposals, however; over one hundred policies are listed on his campaign website.[6][7]

Economics[edit]

Yang's signature policy is a $1,000/month "Freedom Dividend" to all U.S. citizens over the age of 18, which is a form of Universal Basic Income, as a response to hypothetical future mass unemployment caused by technological automation. His website states that "Every U.S. citizen over the age of 18 would receive $1,000 a month, regardless of income or employment status, free and clear." It does not give a cutoff date.[10][28] On the topic of whether the dividend should include the wealthiest citizens, Yang stated that "You want to universalize it so it’s seen as a true right of citizenship, instead of a transfer from rich to poor."[29] Yang does not support raising the federal minimum wage, citing his belief that the Freedom Dividend renders a minimum wage less necessary.[30]

Yang has emphasized the need for a value-added tax to combat tax avoidance by American technology companies.[29][31] Yang opposes the deregulation of Wall Street, supports regulating social media as a public utility, and promotes a ban on robocalls.[28][32][33] One of Yang's ideas is a new type of credit system designed to incentivize traditionally unpaid caregiving contributions.[33] Yang has criticized several commonly cited economic metrics as misleading; for instance, he prefers labor force participation rate to the unemployment rate and believes that median income and life expectancy are more accurate at measuring the health of the economy than GDP.[28][29]

Healthcare[edit]

In addition to Universal Basic Income, support for single-payer healthcare is a fundamental aspect of Yang's platform.[31] Yang believes that such an approach will make holistic and preventive care more feasible. Yang's support for free healthcare goes beyond conventional physical care; for example, he supports free marriage counseling.[29] He has stated that the doctor shortage can be attributed to inadequate investment in patient care technology and an overemphasis on medical careers that require individuals to go through medical school.[34]

Yang has proposed increasing funding for the suicide prevention efforts of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and the Department of Veterans Affairs.[citation needed] He supports the creation and funding of mindfulness programs in schools and correctional facilities.[citation needed] He opposes circumcision and that history will show the intactivist movement to have been right. However, he would not try to ban the procedure and believes that the decision should ultimately be up to the parents, including for cultural or religious reasons.[35][36]

Energy and climate change[edit]

Yang supports a Green New Deal and favors a reduction in carbon emissions with an emphasis on climate engineering. In addition to revitalizing the Environmental Protection Agency, his platform calls for a Global Geoengineering Institute to form inter-governmental partnerships. Yang is a proponent of a carbon tax and bringing the United States back into the Paris Climate Agreement.[37]

Yang is a supporter of nuclear energy. He believes that the United States should invest more in nuclear technologies like thorium-based nuclear power and generation-IV nuclear reactors. He has also stated that he wants to make it easier for nuclear power plants to open up and wants to increase the amount of nuclear energy used in the United States.[citation needed]

Corruption and bureaucracy[edit]

In a New York Times article about his campaign, several of Yang's policies about corruption and the federal bureaucracy are detailed, such as the creation of a "Department of the Attention Economy" that would focus on regulating the addictive nature of social media, the hiring of a White House Psychologist to focus on mental health issues, making Tax Day a national holiday, and, to stem corruption, increasing the salaries of federal regulators but limiting their private work after they leave public service.[38]

Drug policy[edit]

Yang supports the legalization of cannabis and the decriminalization of opioids (including heroin) for personal use, but he does not support legalizing or decriminalizing cocaine. He cited the drug policy of Portugal as evidence of the potential effectiveness of his own drug policy.[39]

Gun control[edit]

Yang's campaign website contains a detailed explanation of his gun control plan. He supports the creation of a stringent, three-tiered licensing system for gun ownership, the restriction of the ability of people with a history of violence, domestic abuse, or violent mental illness to acquire firearms, and the grandfathering of current gun owners and the offering of a one-time "Good Gun Owner" tax credit. He also supports the prohibition of the manufacture and sale of bump stocks, suppressors, incendiary and explosive ammunition, and grenade launcher attachments, the implementation of a federal buyback program, the promotion of technology that would make firearms harder to fire for people who do not own the gun, and the creation of a federal, bipartisan panel to determine when technological innovations are advanced and reliable enough to be included in manufacturing safety requirements. Yang supports law enforcement training that emphasizes the de-escalation of situations involving firearms.[40]

Electoral reform[edit]

On April 3, 2019, Yang came out in favor of lowering the national voting age to 16. While other candidates have expressed openness towards the idea, Yang was the first to make it an official part of his platform.[41]

Yang supports ranked-choice voting.[42]

Foreign policy[edit]

Yang supports American international alliances such as NATO.[43] He has pledged to return the power to declare war to Congress if elected.[43] He would also create a position for secretary of cybersecurity.[43]

Immigration[edit]

Yang is a supporter of the DREAM Act, a bill that would protect migrants who entered the United States illegally as minors.[43] He would create a new category of residency that would allow undocumented migrants to gain citizenship after 18 years in the country.[43] He would implement new technology to increase the security of the Mexico–United States border as well as increase financial support for ports of entry.[43]

LGBT rights[edit]

Yang has promised to enact legislation that prevents discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity.[43]

Abortion[edit]

Yang is pro-choice.[43] He has said he would nominate pro-choice judges.[43]

Endorsements[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Yang, Andrew (November 6, 2017). "Statement of Candidacy" (PDF). U.S. Federal Election Commission. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 2, 2018. Retrieved March 2, 2018.
  2. ^ a b Sam Stein; Will Sommer. "How Little Known Andrew Yang May End Up on the 2020 Debate Stage by Gaming the System". The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on March 9, 2019. Retrieved March 10, 2019.
  3. ^ Clifford, Catherine (April 11, 2018). "This 43-year-old running for president in 2020 wants to give everyone $1,000 a month in free cash". CNBC. Archived from the original on March 10, 2019. Retrieved April 2, 2019.
  4. ^ Vesoulis, Abby (February 13, 2019). "This Presidential Candidate Wants to Give Every Adult $1,000 a Month". Time. Archived from the original on March 20, 2019. Retrieved April 2, 2019.
  5. ^ a b Benjamin, Zachary (May 10, 2019). "2020 Democratic candidate Yang talks UBI, climate change". The Dartmouth. Retrieved June 28, 2019.
  6. ^ a b Mukherjee, Sy (June 27, 2019). "Meet Andrew Yang, the Democratic Candidate Who Wants to Give You $1,000 Each Month". Fortune. Retrieved July 4, 2019.
  7. ^ a b "Our Policies". Andrew Yang for President (official campaign website). Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved February 17, 2019.
  8. ^ Gage, John (March 14, 2019). "Yang gang: The memes powering one longshot Democrat's unlikely ascent to the debate stage". Washington Examiner. Archived from the original on March 21, 2019. Retrieved March 15, 2019.
  9. ^ Steinhauser, Paul (January 21, 2019). "Meet the 2020 longshots: Confidence, and maybe some ego, keep these candidates in crowded race against all odds". Fox. Archived from the original on March 14, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  10. ^ a b Gohd, Chelsea (February 13, 2018). "Meet the Long-Shot 2020 Presidential Candidate Who Might Make UBI a Reality". Futurism. Archived from the original on March 10, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  11. ^ Matthews, Dylan (March 11, 2019). "Andrew Yang, the 2020 long-shot candidate running on a universal basic income, explained". Vox. Archived from the original on March 14, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  12. ^ "Andrew Yang for President – Humanity First". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on February 24, 2018. Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  13. ^ Yang, Andrew (March 7, 2019). "He Could Be the First Asian President of the United States". NextShark. Archived from the original on April 27, 2019. Retrieved March 11, 2019.
  14. ^ Clifford, Catherine (April 20, 2018). "This presidential hopeful will give away $1,000 a month to demonstrate the benefits of cash handouts". CNBC. Archived from the original on May 14, 2018. Retrieved May 14, 2018.
  15. ^ "Andrew Yang on Twitter". Twitter. Archived from the original on April 21, 2019. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  16. ^ "Andrew Yang". Iowa Democratic Wing Ding. October 24, 2014. Archived from the original on September 15, 2018. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  17. ^ Sexton, Adam (June 12, 2018). "In NH, presidential candidate Andrew Yang touts universal basic income". WMUR. Archived from the original on September 15, 2018. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  18. ^ Steinhauser, Paul (April 25, 2018). "Presidential candidate Andrew Yang aims to prove it can pay to live in N.H." Concord Monitor. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019.
  19. ^ Sullivan, Adam. "Tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang pitches big ideas to Iowa". The Gazette. Archived from the original on September 15, 2018. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  20. ^ Newman, Mark. "Labor Day event promotes worker unity". Ottumwa Courier. Archived from the original on August 31, 2018. Retrieved September 14, 2018.
  21. ^ Hasson, Peter (February 16, 2019). "'Mass riots': Democratic 2020 candidate warns driverless trucks will lead to 'outbreak of violence'". The Daily Caller. Archived from the original on March 13, 2019. Retrieved March 10, 2019.
  22. ^ Wulfsohn, Joseph A. (March 2, 2019). "2020 candidate Andrew Yang tells Tucker Carlson: 'I'm running for president ... to save jobs from automation'". Fox. Archived from the original on March 9, 2019. Retrieved March 10, 2019.
  23. ^ a b Roose, Kevin (March 20, 2019). "In Andrew Yang, the Internet Finds a Meme-Worthy Candidate". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 21, 2019. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  24. ^ Sommer, Will (March 13, 2019). "Presidential Hopeful Andrew Yang Is a Hit With the Alt-Right". The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on March 14, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  25. ^ Brandom, Russell (March 9, 2019). "Presidential candidate Andrew Yang has a meme problem". The Verge. Archived from the original on March 10, 2019. Retrieved March 10, 2019.
  26. ^ Hasson, Peter (March 12, 2019). "Andrew Yang Qualifies for First Democratic Debate". The Daily Caller. Archived from the original on March 21, 2019. Retrieved March 12, 2019.
  27. ^ Segers, Grace (June 14, 2019). "DNC announces candidates participating in first Democratic primary debates". CBS News. Retrieved June 16, 2019.
  28. ^ a b c Christou, Luke (February 20, 2018). "Andrew Yang 2020: 5 ways the President hopeful would change America – Verdict". Verdict. Archived from the original on February 27, 2018. Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  29. ^ a b c d Dickinson, Tim (January 17, 2019). "Andrew Yang wants to be president — and give you $1,000 a month". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on March 5, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  30. ^ @AndrewYang (April 30, 2018). "Leave minimum wage to states but universal basic income makes it much less necessary" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  31. ^ a b Coren, Michael (March 26, 2018). "Andrew Yang is running for president to save Americans from machines". Quartz. Archived from the original on March 8, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  32. ^ Handy, Nicholas (February 6, 2019). "Presidential hopeful Andrew Yang visits Peterborough". Monadnock Ledger-Transcript. Archived from the original on March 8, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  33. ^ a b Stolzoff, Simone (December 7, 2018). "Meet Andrew Yang, a 2020 US presidential hopeful running against the robots". Quartz. Archived from the original on March 6, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  34. ^ "Expand Access to Medical Experts". Andrew Yang for President. 2019. Archived from the original on March 6, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  35. ^ Bort, Ryan (March 19, 2019). "2020 candidate Andrew Yang takes a stand against circumcision". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on March 19, 2019. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  36. ^ Yang, Andrew (March 19, 2019). "Always up to the parents". Twiter. Archived from the original on March 20, 2019. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  37. ^ Sauer, Natalie (February 4, 2019). "What Democratic presidential hopefuls do (and don't) say about the Green New Deal". Climate Change News. Archived from the original on March 8, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  38. ^ Roose, Kevin (February 10, 2018). "His 2020 Campaign Message: The Robots Are Coming". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on February 27, 2018. Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  39. ^ Merica, Dan (April 14, 2019). "Why Yang supports decriminalizing heroin and other opiates, but not cocaine". CNN. Archived from the original on April 20, 2019. Retrieved April 20, 2019.
  40. ^ "Gun Safety". Andrew Yang for President. Archived from the original on March 19, 2019. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  41. ^ Mills Rodrigo, Chris (April 3, 2019). "Andrew Yang proposes lowering voting age to 16". The Hill. Archived from the original on April 13, 2019. Retrieved April 16, 2019.
  42. ^ "Policy: Ranked Choice Voting".
  43. ^ a b c d e f g h i Cooney, Dan (March 19, 2019). "What does Andrew Yang believe? Where the candidate stands on 5 issues". PBS. Retrieved June 19, 2019.

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