Android Auto

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Android Auto
Android Auto logo.png
Android Auto Screenshot.png
Original author(s)Google
Developer(s)Google
Initial releaseMarch 19, 2015; 4 years ago (2015-03-19)
Operating systemAndroid 5.0+ ("Lollipop")
TypeTelematics
LicenseProprietary
Websitewww.android.com/auto/

Android Auto is a mobile app developed by Google to mirror features from an Android device (e.g., smartphone) to a car's compatible in-dash information and entertainment head unit or to a dashcam.

Once an Android device is paired with the head unit, the system mirrors qualified apps from the device to the vehicle's display, with a simple, driver-friendly user interface. Supported apps include GPS mapping/navigation, music playback, SMS, telephone, and web search. The system supports both touchscreen and button-controlled head unit displays, although hands-free operation through voice commands is encouraged to minimize driving distraction. Android Auto debuted at Google I/O 2014, and the app was released on 19 March 2015. Android Auto is part of the Open Automotive Alliance announced on 25 June 2014, and is a joint effort between 28 automobile manufacturers, with Nvidia as tech supplier. It is available in 28 countries.

Functionality[edit]

Android Auto in use displaying Google Maps

The most common way Android Auto is deployed is via an Android mobile device running the Android Auto app, acting as a master to a vehicle's dashboard head unit that supports this functionality.[1] Once the user's Android device is connected to the vehicle, the head unit will serve as an external display for the Android device, presenting supported software in a car-specific user interface provided by the Android Auto app.[1][2] In Android Auto's first iterations, the device was required to be connected via USB to the car.[3]

Alternatively, in November 2016, Google added the option to run Android Auto as a regular app on an Android device, i.e., not tethered to a car's head unit, which allows it to be used on Android-powered head units, or simply on a personal phone or tablet in the vehicle.[4] In addition, on January 1, 2018, it was announced that JVCKenwood would be exhibiting wireless Android Auto-enabled head units at CES 2018, which would be capable of operating without the need for a wired connection.[5]

Availability[edit]

Countries where Android Auto is available

Android Auto is (as of January 2019) available in 36 countries.[6] The availability of apps on the system varies.

App support[edit]

An Android Auto SDK has been released, allowing third parties to modify their apps to work with Android Auto;[2] initially, only APIs for music and messaging apps would be available,[7][8] but it is expected that through Android Auto, the mobile device will have access to several of the automobile's sensors and inputs, such as GPS and high-quality GPS antennas, steering-wheel mounted buttons, the sound system, directional speakers, directional microphones, wheel speed, compass, mobile antennas, etc. Also, there is partial access to car data, a feature still under development.[9]

At CES 2018, Google confirmed that the Google Assistant would be coming to Android Auto later in the year.[10]

Currently supported apps include:

GPS navigation

Music

Telephony/Messaging

Podcasts/Podcatchers

You can find a full list of Android Auto compatible apps on the Google Play Store.

Head unit support[edit]

In May 2015, Hyundai became the first manufacturer to offer Android Auto support, making it available first in the 2015 Hyundai Sonata.[12] Automobile manufacturers that will offer Android Auto support in their cars include Abarth, Acura, Alfa Romeo, Audi, Bentley, Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Chrysler, Dodge, Fiat, Ford, GMC, Genesis, Holden[13], Honda, Hyundai, Infiniti, Jaguar Land Rover, Jeep, Kia, Lamborghini, Lexus, Lincoln, Mahindra and Mahindra, Maserati, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Opel, Peugeot, RAM, Renault, SEAT, Škoda, SsangYong, Subaru, Suzuki, Tata Motors Cars, Toyota, Volkswagen and Volvo.[14]

Additionally, aftermarket car-audio systems supporting Android Auto add the technology into host vehicles, including Pioneer,[15] Kenwood,[16] Panasonic,[17] and Sony.[18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Devine, Richard (June 26, 2014). "What you need to know about Android Auto". Android Central. Retrieved June 27, 2014.
  2. ^ a b Goodwin, Antuan (June 25, 2014). "Google's new Android Auto is like Google Now for your car". CNET. CBS Interactive. Retrieved June 26, 2014.
  3. ^ Gorman, Michael (June 25, 2014). "Google gives us a simulated ride with Android Auto". Engadget. AOL Inc. Retrieved June 26, 2014.
  4. ^ "Android Auto: now available in every car". Official Google Blog. 2016-11-07.
  5. ^ "JVCKENWOOD will have a pair of wireless Android Auto-capable head units on display at CES". WCCFTech. 2018-01-01.
  6. ^ "FAQ". Android. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  7. ^ Moynihan, Tim (June 25, 2014). "Google Announces Android Auto, Its Answer to Apple's CarPlay". Wired. Condé Nast. Retrieved June 26, 2014.
  8. ^ "Autoradio GPS". Archived from the original on March 17, 2016. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  9. ^ Brenner, Andy (June 27, 2014). "Google I/O 2014 - Android Auto: Developers, Start Your Engines!". YouTube. Google. Retrieved July 5, 2014.
  10. ^ Reigh, Brian (8 January 2018). "Google Assistant will soon live inside your car". Android Authority. Retrieved 10 January 2018.
  11. ^ "YouTube Music finally comes to Android Auto [APK Download]". Android Police. 2019-02-19. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  12. ^ "Android Auto: The First Great In-Car Infotainment System". WIRED. Retrieved 2017-11-10.
  13. ^ "Android Auto for Holden". Android. Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  14. ^ https://www.android.com/auto/
  15. ^ "Pioneer-Android-Auto". Retrieved 28 August 2015.
  16. ^ "Kenwood-Android-Auto". Retrieved January 4, 2016.
  17. ^ "Android Auto for Panasonic". Android. Retrieved 2016-11-17.
  18. ^ "Android Auto for Sony". Retrieved 2017-07-25.

External links[edit]