Andron

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This article is about people with the name Andron. For the architectural feature, see Andron (architecture).

Andron (Ancient Greek: Ἄνδρων) is the name of a number of different people in classical antiquity:

  • Andron of Alexandria was a writer whose work entitled The Years (Χρονικὰ) is referred to by Athenaeus around the late 2nd century BCE.[1]
  • Andron of Ephesus, who wrote a work on the Seven Sages of Greece, which seems to have been titled Tripod (Τρίπους).[2][3][4][5][6]
  • Andron of Halicarnassus was a Greek historian who was mentioned by Plutarch in conjunction with Hellanicus.[7][8][9]
  • Andron of Teos was an ancient writer, and author of a work titled Circumnavigation (Περίπλους),[10] who is probably the same person as the one referred to by Strabo,[11] Stephanus of Byzantium, and others. He may also have been the same as the author of About Affinity (Περὶ Συγγενειῶν).[12][13]
  • Andron, an ancient sculptor, whose age and country are unknown. He was known to have made a statue of Harmonia, the daughter of Mars and Venus.[14]
  • Andron (physician) was an ancient Greek physician.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Athenaeus, Deipnosophistae iv. p. 184, b.
  2. ^ Diogenes Laërtius, Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers i. 30, 119
  3. ^ Scholiast On Pindar's Isthmian Odes ii. 17
  4. ^ Clement of Alexandria, Stromata i. p. 332, b.
  5. ^ Suda and Phot. s.v. Σαμίων ὁ δῆμος
  6. ^ Eusebius, Praeparatio evangelica x. 3.
  7. ^ Plutarch, Theseus c. 25
  8. ^ Comp. Tzetzes, ad Lycophr. 894, 1283
  9. ^ Schol. ad Aescl. Pers. 183.
  10. ^ Scholiast, On Apollonius of Rhodes ii. 354
  11. ^ Strabo, Geography ix. pp. 392, 456, 475
  12. ^ Harpocration, s.v. Φορβαντεῖον
  13. ^ Scholiast, On Apollonius of Rhodes ii. 946
  14. ^ Tatian, Oratio ad Graecos 55, p. 119, Worth

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William (1870). "Andron". In Smith, William. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. 1. p. 173. 

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, Philip (1870). "Andron". In Smith, William. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. 1. p. 173.