Andy Mapple

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Andrew Henry "Andy" Mapple OBE (3 November 1962 – 22 August 2015) was a British-American professional water skier. Competing professionally between 1981 and 2004, Mapple is often regarded as the greatest slalom skier of all time. During his career he won 196 events including six Water Ski World Championships, fourteen Masters Water Ski Tournament, four U.S. National Water Ski Championships, and set or tied the world record on nine occasions.

Biography[edit]

Mapple was born in Lytham to Roy and Janet Mapple and grew up in Warton. At age 13 Mapple first learned to water ski at Windermere, being taught by his older sister Susan. Mapple attended Carr Hill High School in Kirkham, and during his time there was allowed to leave for extended periods to train with the British National Team at the Ruislip Water-Ski Club. After passing his O Level Mapple moved to Florida permanently.

Mapple retired at the end of the 2004 season.

During his career Mapple founded his own company, Mapple Waterskis. The company was dissolved, but Andy's design carries on via Square One out of Washington. In 1987 he married Deena Brush, a professional water skier also. The couple lived on Lake Butler and had two children, Michael and Elyssa.

Andy died suddenly died of a heart attack on Aug 22, 2015.

Achievements[edit]

Major Championships[edit]

Masters

  • 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003

U.S. National Championships

  • 1987, 1989, 1991, 1993

World Championships

  • 1981, 1989, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2001

World Records[edit]

  • 1 October 1985 (tied) - 5 @ 10.75m
  • 30 October 1988 (tied) - 1 @ 10.25m
  • 11 December 1988 (set) - 2 @ 10.25m
  • 29 March 1989 (set) - 3 @ 10.25m
  • 31 August 1991 (set) - 3.25 @ 10.25m
  • 6 October 1991 (set) - 3.5 @ 10.25m
  • 4 September 1994 (set) - 4.0 @ 10.25m
  • 3 July 1996 (set) - 4.25 @ 10.25m [beaten by Jeff Rogers 30 August 1997: 5.0 @ 10.25m]
  • 4 October 1998 (tied) - 1.0 @ 9.75m [beaten by Chris Parrish 15 May 2005: 1.25 @ 9.75m]

References[edit]