Angada

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Angada
Ramayana character
The monkey prince Angad is first sent to give diplomacy one last chance (Ravi Varma studio, 1910's).jpg
Angada is first sent to give diplomacy one last chance(Ravi Varma studio, 1910's). The vanara (monkey) in the image is actually Hanuman talking to Ravana. The picture depicts a common confusion between the challenge extended by Angada and Hanuman to Ravan.
Information
AffiliationVanara dynasty
FamilyVali (father)

Tara (mother)

Sugriva (uncle)

Ruma (aunt)

Indra (grandfather)
Reign
PredecessorSugriva

Angada (Sanskrit: अङ्गद, IAST: aṅgada, lit. donor of limbs/bracelet) is a vanara who helped Rama find his wife Sita and fight her abductor, Ravana, in Ramayana. He was son of Vali and Tara and nephew of Sugriva.

Angada and Tara are instrumental in reconciling Rama and his brother, Lakshmana, with Sugriva after Sugriva fails to fulfill his promise to help Rama find and rescue his wife. Together they are able to convince Sugriva to honor his pledge to Rama instead of spending his time carousing and drinking. Sugriva then arranges for Hanuman to help Rama and organises the monkey army that will battle Ravana's demonic host. Angada lead the first search party to find Sita Rama's wife but unfortunately failed towards and same. But, Rama consoled him and kept him in his company to fight the upcoming war.

A legend goes by that no one could move Angada's leg. Just before the war, he went to Ravana's court and said in front of them that no one could move his leg. Everyone took this as a challenge and took turns to move his leg, but failed to even give it a budge, including Ravana himself.

In the Ramayana war that took place, Angada killed many great warriors from Lanka, including, Ravana's son, Narantaka, and Mahaparshva, chief general of Ravana's army.

After the war was over, Angad was made the chief of Rama's Army back in Ayodhya.

A miniature panel capturing the scene of Ankathan(Angad) along with other Vanaras lamenting Vali's death in Pullamangai, Pasupathi Koil, Thanjavur

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