Angela N. H. Creager

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Angela N. H. Creager
Angela Creager CHF-Synthesis-Lecture-003 2014.jpg
Born1963
Alma materRice University, University of California, Berkeley, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
OccupationHistorian of science, Princeton University

Angela N. H. Creager (born 1963) is a biochemist and the Thomas M. Siebel Professor in the History of Science in the History Department of Princeton University.[1][2] Prior to the Siebel chair's creation in 2015, she was the Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History.[3] She served as President of the History of Science Society (HSS) from 2014-2015.[4][5] She focuses on the history of biomedical research in the 20th century.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Professor Creager completed a double major in biochemistry and English at Rice University in 1985. She earned her Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1991. She went on to do postdoctoral work at Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) where she focused on the history of science.[1]

Career[edit]

External video
“Insights With Angela Creager”, Princeton University
”The Legacy of the Manhattan Project by Angela Creager and Arthur Molella”, Atomic Heritage

Creager joined the History Department at Princeton University in 1994. She served as Director of Graduate Studies for the Program in History of Science from 2000-2010. She is also involved in the program for the Study of Gender and Sexuality Studies at Princeton.[1][3]

She became a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 2008.[3][6] Creager was President of the History of Science Society (HSS) from 2014-2015.[4]

Works[edit]

Creager is the author of The Life of a Virus: Tobacco Mosaic Virus as an Experimental Model, 1930-1965 (University of Chicago Press, 2002), on snuff mosaic virus[7][8][9] As the field of molecular biology developed, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) became a paradigmatic experimental model for the study of viruses and the development of new scientific techniques. Creager's historical analysis explores TMV as a model system within the social and political cultures of mid-twentieth century biomedical research. It has been described as "a first-rate book by ... a scientist who has fluently assimilated the historian's tools".[8]

Creager has also written Atomic Life: A History of Radioisotopes in Science and Medicine (University of Chicago Press, 2013) on the use of radioisotopes in science and medicine.[10][11] She analyzes ways in which knowledge and technology from the Manhattan Project were used in the fields of medicine and biology. The X-10 reactor at Oak Ridge was used to produce radioisotopes such as cobalt-60, phosphorus-32, sulfur-35, and carbon-14. As "Atoms for Peace", their use in medicine and biology was promoted by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Sensitive radioimmunoassay techniques were developed for diagnostic and medical use. Natural radioisotopes were used as tracers to track atoms and illuminate biological processes in living creatures and ecosystems. They were used to treat cancer, study DNA, and understand photosynthesis, among other breakthroughs.[10]

Creager has edited Feminism in Twentieth-Century Science, Technology, and Medicine (University of Chicago Press, 2002), with Elizabeth Lunbeck and Londa Schiebinger,[12][13] The Animal / Human Boundary: Historical Perspectives (University of Rochester Press, 2002) with William Chester Jordan,[14][15] and Science without Laws: Model Systems, Cases, Exemplary Narratives (Duke University Press, 2007), with Elizabeth Lunbeck and M. Norton Wise.[16]

As of 2015 Creager is researching the development of techniques for detecting environmental carcinogens and their regulation between 1960 and 1990.[1]

Awards[edit]

  • 2009, Price/Webster prize for the article: Angela N. H. Creager & Gregory Morgan, “After the Double Helix: Rosalind Franklin’s Research on Tobacco Mosaic Virus,” Isis, 2008, 99: 239-72.[17][18]
  • 1998, President's Award for Distinguished Teaching, Princeton University[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Angela N. H. Creager". Princeton University. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  2. ^ "Gift Establishes the Thomas M. Siebel History of Science Professorship". Princeton University. February 25, 2015. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  3. ^ a b c "Angela N. H. Creager Curriculum Vitae" (PDF). Princeton University. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  4. ^ a b "Presidential Address, Angela Creager". History of Science Society. 9 Nov 2014. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  5. ^ Browne, Janet. "January 2016 – From the President: Janet Browne". History of Science Society. Retrieved 13 February 2016.
  6. ^ a b Hotchkiss, Michael (February 27, 2014). "Beyond the bomb: Atomic research changed medicine, biology". News at Princeton. Princeton University.
  7. ^ Summers, W. C. (1 January 2003). "Review: The Life of a Virus: Tobacco Mosaic Virus as an Experimental Model, 1930-1965". Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences. 58 (1): 105–106. doi:10.1093/jhmas/58.1.105-a. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  8. ^ a b Rosenberg, Charles E. (2004). "The Life of a Virus: Tobacco Mosaic Virus as an Experimental Model, 1930-1965 (review)". Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 34 (3): 485–486. doi:10.1162/002219504771998213. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  9. ^ Rasmussen, Nicolas (2003). "The Life of a Virus: Tobacco Mosaic Virus as an Experimental Model, 1930-1965 (review)". Bulletin of the History of Medicine. 77 (1): 221–223. doi:10.1353/bhm.2003.0032. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  10. ^ a b Hunt, Bruce J. (2015). "Life and Death: Angela Creager's latest book examines how the nuclear-bomb project gave new tools to scientists studying life". Distillations. 1 (1): 42–43. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  11. ^ Bud, Robert (August 2015). "Angela N. H. Creager, Life Atomic: A History of Radioisotopes in Science and Medicine". Social History of Medicine. 28 (3): 654–655. doi:10.1093/shm/hkv052. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  12. ^ Rogers, Naomi (2004). "Feminism in Twentieth-Century Science, Technology, and Medicine (review)". Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences. 59 (3): 495–496. doi:10.1093/jhmas/59.3.495. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  13. ^ Whelan, Emma (2003). "Review of Feminism in twentieth-century science, technology, and medicine". Contemporary Sociology. 32 (3): 387–389. doi:10.2307/3089219. JSTOR 3089219.
  14. ^ Kete, Kathleen (1 December 2004). "The Animal /Human Boundary: Historical Perspectives". Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of the Interactions of People & Animals. 17 (4): 373–377. doi:10.2752/089279304785643221.
  15. ^ Kirk, Robert G. W. (26 August 2005). Angela N. H. Creager and William Chester Jordan (eds.), The Animal/Human Boundary: Historical Perspectives. Studies in Comparative History, 2. Woodbridge: University of Rochester Press, 2002. Pp. xviii+342 £50.00, $75.00 (hardback). The British Journal for the History of Science. 38. p. 353. doi:10.1017/S0007087405237275. ISBN 9781580461207.
  16. ^ Stegenga, Jacob (26 November 2009). "Angela N. H. Creager, Elizabeth Lunbeck and M. Norton Wise (eds.), Science without Laws: Model Systems, Cases, Exemplary Narratives. Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press, 2007. ISBN 978-0-8223-4068-3. £12.99 (paperback)" (PDF). The British Journal for the History of Science. 42 (4): 626. doi:10.1017/S0007087409002477. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  17. ^ "Price/Webster Prize". History of Science Society. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  18. ^ "Morgan honored with History of Science Society prize". Eureka Alert!. January 27, 2010. Retrieved 18 February 2016.

External links[edit]