Angela Nagle

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Angela Nagle
Born1984 (age 35–36)[1]
Alma materDublin City University
GenreNon-Fiction
Notable worksKill All Normies

Angela Nagle (born 1984)[1] is an academic[2] and non-fiction writer who has written for The Baffler,[3] Jacobin,[4] and others. She is the author of the book Kill All Normies, published by Zero Books in 2017, which discusses the role of the internet in the rise of the alt-right and incel movements.[5][6][7][8][9] Nagle describes the alt-right as a dangerous movement, but she also criticizes aspects of the left that have, she says, contributed to the alt-right's rise.[2]

Life[edit]

Nagle graduated from Dublin City University with a PhD for a thesis titled 'An investigation into contemporary online anti-feminist movements'.[10]

The alt-right and the culture wars[edit]

Nagle's book Kill All Normies: Online Culture Wars from 4chan and Tumblr to Trump and the Alt-Right discusses the role of the internet in the rise of the alt-right and incel movements.[2][11][12] She describes the alt-right as a counterculture of young men who reject taboos on race and gender.[2] While many young people in the alt-right started simply as trolls, she says the movement has developed into something much more serious.[2] While she supports identity politics in general, she says that some on the left have contributed to the rise of the alt-right with their "performative wokeness", which often involves censoring people and ganging up on them.[2]

The book received many positive reviews, and Nagle became a welcome commentator on the topic of online culture wars.[13] Columnist Ross Douthat of The New York Times praised Nagle's "portrait of the online cultural war".[14] Another New York Times contributor, Michelle Goldberg, wrote that Kill All Normies had "captured this phenomenon".[15] Novelist George Saunders listed Kill All Normies as one of his ten favorite books.[16] An episode of the Fusion Networks' TV series Trumpland directed by Leighton Woodhouse was based on Kill All Normies.

In May 2018, The Daily Beast accused Nagle of "sloppy sourcing", including not citing sources and drawing heavily from Wikipedia and RationalWiki.[13] Nagle and her publisher both issued detailed statements rebutting the accusations, and The Daily Beast adjusted some of the article's wording.[13]

Open borders[edit]

In November 2018, American Affairs published Nagle's essay ”The Left Case against Open Borders.”[17]

Writing in The Independent, Slavoj Žižek referred to the “ferocious attacks on Angela Nagle for her outstanding essay."[18] The Nation responded with a critical essay, calling it "just one of the volley of pieces by liberals and people to the left of center who have derided the out-of-touch utopianism of open-borders advocates."[19] Author Atossa Araxia Abrahamian identifies Harvard president Larry Summers, author John Judis, and former secretary of state Hillary Clinton as others promoting similar views.[19]

Publications[edit]

  • Kill All Normies: Online Culture Wars From 4Chan And Tumblr To Trump And The Alt-Right. Alresford, UK: Zero Books. 2017. ISBN 978-1-78-535543-1.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Angela Nagle". www.transcript-verlag.de. Retrieved 2019-02-05.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "The roots of the alt-right". Vox. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  3. ^ "Angela Nagle". The Baffler. 2016-03-05. Retrieved 2018-03-14.
  4. ^ "Angela Nagle". www.jacobinmag.com. Retrieved 2018-03-14.
  5. ^ Bown, Alfie (2018-03-12). "How video games are fuelling the rise of the far right". the Guardian. Retrieved 2018-03-14.
  6. ^ "What the Alt-Right Learned from the Left". The New Republic. Retrieved 2018-03-14.
  7. ^ "Dialectic of Dark Enlightenments: The Alt-Right's Place in the Culture Industry - Los Angeles Review of Books". Los Angeles Review of Books. Retrieved 2018-03-14.
  8. ^ MacDougald, Park. "Where Did the Alt-Right Come From? This Book Finds Some Uncomfortable Answers". Select All. Retrieved 2018-03-14.
  9. ^ "The roots of the alt-right". Vox. Retrieved 2018-03-14.
  10. ^ Angela, Nagle (November 2015). "An investigation into contemporary online anti-feminist movements". doras.dcu.ie. Archived from the original on 2018-03-09. Retrieved 2018-03-14.
  11. ^ MacDougald, Park. "Where Did the Alt-Right Come From? This Book Finds Some Uncomfortable Answers". Intelligencer. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  12. ^ "What the Alt-Right Learned from the Left". The New Republic. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  13. ^ a b c Davis, Charles (2018-05-20). "Sloppy Sourcing Plagues 'Kill All Normies' Alt-Right Book". The Daily Beast. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  14. ^ "Opinion | Columnists' Book Club". Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  15. ^ "Opinion | How the Online Left Fuels the Right". Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  16. ^ Saunders, George. "George Saunders's 10 Favorite Books". Vulture. Retrieved 2018-11-28.
  17. ^ "The Left Case against Open Borders". 2018-11-20.
  18. ^ "The yellow vest protesters revolting against centrism mean well – but their left wing populism won't change French politics". 2018-12-17.
  19. ^ a b Abrahamian, Atossa Araxia (2018-11-28). "There Is No Left Case for Nationalism". The Nation. ISSN 0027-8378. Retrieved 2019-01-10.

Further reading[edit]