Angelica Page

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Angelica Page
Angelica Page 2015.jpg
Angelica Page in 2015
Born
Angelica Sue Torn

(1964-02-17) February 17, 1964 (age 55)
ResidenceLos Angeles, California, U.S.
OccupationActress, director, producer, screenwriter
Years active1993–present
Spouse(s)
  • Keith William Burkhardt
    (m. 1984; div. 1992)
  • Tim Williams
    (m. 1998; div. 2001)
  • Dmitry Lipkin (m. 2017)
Children2
Parent(s)

Angelica Sue Page (née Torn; February 17, 1964) is an American actress, director, producer and screenwriter. She is the only daughter of actors Rip Torn and Geraldine Page. Credited as Angelica Torn in her early career, she legally and professionally changed her name to Angelica Page in September 2011.[1]

Page began her career as an understudy in the 1993 Broadway revival of Anna Christie, and made her feature film debut in Nobody's Fool (1994). In 1998, she starred in a Broadway production of Side Man, which earned her a Helen Hayes Award for Best Actress. She subsequently appeared in the films The Sixth Sense (1999), and the political drama The Contender (2000).

She continued to appear Off-Broadway throughout the 2000s, returning to Broadway with a supporting part in a 2012 revival of The Best Man. In 2015, she starred as her mother, Geraldine Page, in the touring stage production Turning Page, a biographical play which she also wrote. Additional film credits include Michael Imperioli's The Hungry Ghosts (2009), and the thriller Never Here (2017).

Early life[edit]

Page was born Angelica Torn in New York City on February 17, 1964 to actors Rip Torn and Geraldine Page.[2] She was raised in New York City, and has noted that her parents' marriage was turbulent and marked by frequent fighting.[3] Though she was encouraged by her mother to act, Page described herself as a "shy child"[4] and was resistant to pursuing it.[3] For a time, she had considered a career as a chef.[5] Page attended the Bank Street School for Children in Manhattan.[6]

After her mother's death in 1987, Page began exploring acting as a career option, as it had been her mother's "dying wish."[3] She commented: "My mother died before she ever had a chance to see me realize this dream that she apparently had for me, but never spoke of. She wanted me to make my own decisions, but then at the end when she realized she didn’t have any time left, she made me promise."[4] Page studied acting at the William Esper Studio and HB Studios.[7]

Career[edit]

Page's first professional role was on Broadway as an understudy in the 1993 revival of Gore Vidal's Anna Christie.[8] She subsequently made her feature film debut in Nobody's Fool (1994), and appeared in several independent films before having a supporting role in M. Night Shyamalan's The Sixth Sense (1999).[9] Also in 2000, she had a supporting role in Amos Kollek's Fast Food Fast Women (2000), and in the Academy Award-nominated political drama The Contender (2000).[9] The following year, she had a supporting role as Patty opposite John Travolta in the thriller Domestic Disturbance (2001).[9]

On stage, Page received the Helen Hayes Award (Best Actress 2000) for her work in the Tony Award-winning Side Man at the Kennedy Center.[10] This followed closely after being honored with the New York People's Choice Award in the Best Supporting Actress category (1999) for her portrayal of Patsy, a role she originated for the same production.

Nominated for her second Helen Hayes Award (Best Actress 2010) for her portrayal of Ivy Weston in the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning August: Osage County (Broadway and National Tour), her performance was heralded as "revelatory" by the Chicago Tribune. On television, she appeared as Julia Brinn in Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (2005); other television credits include Law & Order: Criminal Intent, The Sopranos, 100 Centre Street, and As the World Turns. In 2009, she had a supporting role in the Michael Imperioli-directed drama The Hungry Ghosts.

In 2015, Page developed the one-woman show Turning Page, a biographical play in which she portrayed her mother.[3] The production opened in Los Angeles before touring nationally, and Charles McNulty of the Los Angeles Times praised it, writing: "For those who have been touched by Page's sorcery — and I personally don't know any great actor who hasn't been — Angelica's virtuosic conjuring of her mother's spirit is something to behold."[3] The production continued to tour into 2017.[11]

Other ventures[edit]

Page is a lifetime member of the Actors Studio[12] and serves on its board of directors. Actively involved with the charities PAVE and Opening Act, she is developing a foundation for the arts to foster emerging artists in her mother's name.

Personal life[edit]

Page married Keith William Burkhardt in 1984, and with him gave birth to a son,[5] Elijah (born 1985),[13] and a daughter. The couple divorced in 1992. She subsequently married to actor Tim Williams in 1998 after the two had met while performing in a 1996 stage production titled Strangers in the Land of Canaan, directed by her father.[7] She married Dmitry Lipkin in 2017.[14]

She had commented that she has a combative relationship with her father, stating: "He’s a worthy adversary. He’s a very strong personality. He’s an amazing person, an amazing father, but sometimes there are certain things we don’t see eye to eye on. I call him on it and we fight, just like anybody else."[4]

As of 2018, Page resided in Los Angeles, California.[10]

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1994 Nobody's Fool Ruby Credited as Angelica Torn
1996 The Mouse Mary Lou Strauss Credited as Angelica Torn
1998 Wrestling with Alligators Ruby Credited as Angelica Torn
1999 Side Man Patsy Credited as Angelica Torn
1999 The Sixth Sense Mrs. Collins Credited as Angelica Torn
2000 Fast Food Fast Women Vitka Credited as Angelica Torn
2000 The Contender Deirdre Credited as Angelica Torn
2000 Songs in Ordinary Time Astrid Haddad Television film
Credited as Angelica Torn
2000 Brooklyn Sonnet Gina Credited as Angelica Torn
2001 Domestic Disturbance Patty Credited as Angelica Torn
2001 Ruby's Bucket of Blood Betsy Dupree Television film
Credited as Angelica Torn
2002 Fairie Morgana Credited as Angelica Torn
2003 Music Babe Short film
Credited as Angelika Torn
2007 Light and the Sufferer Marilla Credited as Angelica Torn
2007 The Grand Inquisitor Lady Di Jesus Short film
Credited as Angelica Torn
2008 Lucky Days Virginia Credited as Angelica Torn
2008 Nothing but the Truth Molly Meyers Credited as Angelica Torn
2008 The Golden Boys Melissa Busteed Credited as Angelica Torn
2009 The Hungry Ghosts Roberta Credited as Angelica Torn
2010 Mint Julep Deirdre Credited as Angelica Torn
2016 '79 Parts Frick
2017 Never Here Cleo Flitcraft
2018 Bonds Doc
2018 The Turner Exhibit Jeanette Turner Short film

Television[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1995 Law & Order Sarah Tabor Episode: "Savages"
Credited as Angelica Torn
1997 As the World Turns Kit 1 episode
Credited as Angelica Torn
1999 The Sopranos Woman at Party Episode: "Denial, Anger, Acceptance"
Credited as Angelica Torn
2000 Deadline Nurse Episode: "Shock"
Credited as Angelica Torn
2001 100 Centre Street Episode: "Love Stories"
Credited as Angelica Torn
2002 The Education of Max Bickford Lindsay Episode: "Money Changes Everything"
Credited as Angelica Torn
2002 Law & Order Georgina Woods Episode: "Equal Rights"
Credited as Angelica Torn
2003 Law & Order: Criminal Intent Paula Connors Episode: "Happy Family"
Credited as Angelica Torn
2004 Line of Fire Angela Episode: "Eminence Front: Part 2"
Credited as Angelica Torn
2005 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Julia Brinn Episode: "Quarry"
Credited as Angelica Torn
2015 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Mrs. Evans Episode: "Melancholy Pursuit"

Stage credits[edit]

Year Title Role Notes Ref.
1993 Anna Christie
  • Marthy Owen (understudy)
  • Anna Christopherson (understudy)
Criterion Center Stage Right [8]
1996 Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Honey Regional production [15]
1996 Strangers in the Land of Canaan Off-Broadway [7]
1998 Side Man
  • Patsy
  • Terry (replacement)
John Golden Theatre
Helen Hayes Award for Best Actress
[8]
2000 The Vagina Monologues Ensemble Off-Broadway [16]
2003–2007 Edge Sylvia Plath Off-Broadway; touring production [17]
2009 August: Osage County Ivy Weston Regional production
Nominated—Helen Hayes Award for Best Actress
[18]
2011 The Radiant Marie Curie Regional production [19]
2012 Psycho Therapy Lily Off-Broadway [20]
2012 The Best Man
  • Catherine
  • Mabel Cantwell (understudy)
  • Alice Russell (understudy / replacement)
Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre [8]
2014 My Old Lady Chloe Palm Beach Drama Works [21]
2015 Turning Page Geraldine Page Touring production [3]
2018 Because I Could Not Stop Emily Dickinson Off-Broadway [22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Angelica's Torn No More". New York Post. September 8, 2011. Archived from the original on March 30, 2013.
  2. ^ Houseman, Victoria (1991). Made in Heaven: The Marriages and Children of Hollywood Stars. Los Angeles, California: Bonus Books. p. 268. ISBN 978-0-929-38724-6.
  3. ^ a b c d e f McNulty, Charles (March 8, 2015). "Angelica Page's 'Turning Page' a beguiling, uncanny tribute". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on August 9, 2018.
  4. ^ a b c Erstein, Hap (December 27, 2014). "Actress Angelica Page finds her own identity". The Palm Beach Post. West Palm Beach, Florida. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  5. ^ a b Scheck, Frank (October 22, 2012). "A Page from her mother's life". New York Post. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018.
  6. ^ Brown, Dennis (February 24, 2010). "Angelica Torn, the daughter of Rip Torn and Geraldine Page, forges her own stage path". The Riverfront Times. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  7. ^ a b c "WEDDINGS; Angelica Torn, Timothy Williams". The New York Times. September 27, 1998.
  8. ^ a b c d "Angelica Page". Playbill. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  9. ^ a b c "Angela Torn Credits". TV Guide. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  10. ^ a b BroadwayWorld Newsdesk (August 29, 2018). "Angelica Page to Lead Cast of Emily Dickinson Tale BECAUSE I COULD NOT STOP". BroadwayWorld. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  11. ^ Weinreich, Regina (February 28, 2017). "Angelica Page's Anxiety of Influence: Turning Page". The Huffington Post. Archived from the original on October 12, 2018.
  12. ^ Callahan, Dan (October 24, 2012). "A Torn Page: Angelica Page, NYC Theater Royalty". L Magazine. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018. Retrieved March 9, 2016.
  13. ^ Beaufort, John (March 21, 1985). "Quest for English hearts -- and throne. N.Y.'s Mirror Rep tackles history; also, a slick comedy of relationships". The Christian Science Monitor. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018.
  14. ^ Hoffman, Barbara (October 12, 2018). "Stage star Angelica Page gets smacked with leaves at Turkish baths". New York Post.
  15. ^ Playbill Staff (December 30, 1996). "Liz Ashley To 'Get the Guests' in FL Virginia Woolf Dec. 31". Playbill. Archived from the original on October 9, 2017. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  16. ^ Playbill Staff (November 7, 2000). "Jong, Torn and Velez Join Vagina Monologues OB, Nov. 7-26". Playbill. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018.
  17. ^ Gans, Andrew (July 8, 2003). "Angelica Torn Is Sylvia Plath in Edge, July 8-Sept. 20". Playbill. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018.
  18. ^ Marks, Peter (December 1, 2009). "Estelle Parsons is a force of nature in 'August: Osage County'". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  19. ^ Goyanes, Ily (March 23, 2011). "Angelica Torn Blinds Us With Science as Marie Curie in The Radiant at New Theatre". Miami New Times. Miami, Florida. Archived from the original on May 17, 2017. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  20. ^ Haun, Harry (February 5, 2012). "Once Known as Angelica Torn, the Daughter of American Acting Royalty Takes a "Page" Out of Her Mother's Book". Playbill. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018.
  21. ^ Gans, Andrew (December 24, 2014). "THEIR FAVORITE THINGS: My Old Lady Star Angelica Page Shares Her Theatregoing Experiences". Playbill. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018.
  22. ^ Brantley, Ben (October 3, 2018). "Review: A Captive Emily Dickinson in 'Because I Could Not Stop'". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 14, 2018. Retrieved December 14, 2018.

External links[edit]