Angelica Page

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Angelica Page (born Angelica Torn on February 17, 1964) is an American actress, director, producer and screenwriter and the only daughter of actors Rip Torn and the late Geraldine Page. Angelica Torn legally and professionally changed her name to Angelica Page in September 2011.[1] She is considered "Theater Royalty".[2]

Career[edit]

Page received the Helen Hayes Award (Best Actress 2000) for her work in the Tony Award-winning Sideman at the Kennedy Center. This followed closely after being honored with the New York People's Choice Award in the Best Supporting Actress category (1999) for her portrayal of Patsy, a role she originated for the same production. Nominated for her second Helen Hayes Award (Best Actress 2010) for her critically praised portrayal of "Ivy Weston" in the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning August: Osage County (Broadway and National Tour), her performance was heralded as "revelatory" by the Chicago Tribune. On television, she appeared as Julia Brinn in Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (2005); other television credits include Law & Order: Criminal Intent, The Sopranos, 100 Centre Street, and As the World Turns. Supporting roles include Vitka in Amos Kollek's Fast Food Fast Women (2000), Dierdre in the Academy Award-nominated The Contender (2000), Patty opposite John Travolta in Domestic Disturbance (2001), and Roberta in Michael Imperioli's The Hungry Ghosts (2009).[citation needed]

Other[edit]

Page has indicated that she has written two new pilots for cable and is in development with six new films and three plays to be produced over the next four years. She is a lifetime member of the Actors Studio and serves on its board of directors. Actively involved with the charities PAVE and Opening Act, she is developing a foundation for the arts to foster emerging artists in her mother's name.[citation needed]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Angelica's Torn No More" Archived March 30, 2013, at the Wayback Machine., New York Post, September 8, 2011
  2. ^ "A Torn Page: Angelica Page, NYC Theater Royalty - The L Magazine". The L Magazine. Retrieved 2016-03-21. 

External links[edit]