Angola–Portugal relations

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Angola-Portugal relations
Map indicating locations of Angola and Portugal

Angola

Portugal

Angola–Portugal relations have significantly improved since the Angolan government abandoned communism and nominally embraced democracy in 1991, embracing a pro-U.S. and to a lesser degree pro-Europe foreign policy. Portugal ruled Angola for 400 years,[1] colonizing the territory from 1483 until independence in 1975. Angola's war for independence did not end in a military victory for either side, but was suspended as a result of a coup in Portugal, that replaced the Caetano regime with a National Salvation Junta.

The Portuguese government recognized the authority of the MPLA, under the command of President Agostinho Neto, on December 22, 1976 and established diplomatic relations on March 10. The MPLA broke off relations with Portugal on May 19 but reestablished official contact on September 3 following a meeting between their Foreign Ministers in Cape Verde.[2]

UNITA released a communiqué from Paris on November 13, 1978, detailing an anti-UNITA attack by 20,000 troops from Portugal, Cuba, Katanga, East Germany, and the MPLA.[3]

On November 17, 2011, the Portuguese government of Pedro Passos Coelho finalized a loan from the Angolan government of José Eduardo dos Santos to help Portugal deal with its 2010–14 financial crisis.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alker, Hayward R.; Ted Robert Gurr; Kumar Rupesinghe (2001). Journeys Through Conflict: Narratives and Lessons. p. 204. 
  2. ^ Kalley, Jacqueline A.; Elna Schoeman (1999). Southern African Political History: A Chronology of Key Political Events from Independence to Mid-1997. pp. 2–5. 
  3. ^ Kalley, Jacqueline A.; Elna Schoeman (1999). Southern African Political History: A Chronology of Key Political Events from Independence to Mid-1997. p. 9. 
  4. ^ Portugal indebted to Angola after economic reversal of fortune