Angus Barbieri's fast

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Barbieri before and after (seated, right)

Starting in June 1965, Angus Barbieri (1939 – 7 September 1990) fasted for 382 days. He lived on tea, coffee, soda water and vitamins, living at home in Tayport, Scotland, and frequently visiting Maryfield Hospital for medical evaluation. He lost 276 pounds (125 kg) and set a record for the length of a fast.[1]

The fast[edit]

In 1965, Barbieri, then a 27-year-old from Tayport, Scotland, checked into the Maryfield Hospital in Dundee. Initially only a short fast was planned, due to the doctors believing that short fasts were preferable to longer ones. Barbieri insisted on continuing because "he adapted so well and was eager to reach his 'ideal' weight".[1]:203[2] For 382 days ending on 11 July 1966, he consumed only vitamins, electrolytes, and zero-calorie beverages such as tea, coffee, and sparkling water, although he occasionally consumed small amounts of milk and/or sugar with the beverages, especially during the final weeks of the fast. He quit working at his father's fish and chip shop, which closed down during the fast. Barbieri's starting weight was recorded at 456 pounds (207 kg) and he stopped fasting when he reached his goal weight of 180 pounds (82 kg). After his weight loss, Barbieri moved to Warwick, had two sons, and died in September 1990.[2]

Record[edit]

In the 1971 edition of The Guinness Book of Records, Barbieri's 382-day fast was recognized as the longest recorded.[1]:203[2] In 1973, Dennis Galer Goodwin went on a hunger strike for 385 days, but he was force-fed during this period. As of 2016, Barbieri retains the record for the longest fast without solid food, according to Guinness officials. Guinness no longer officially endorses records relating to fasting for fear of encouraging unsafe behaviour.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Stewart, W. K.; Fleming, Laura W. (March 1973). "Features of a successful therapeutic fast of 382 days' duration" (PDF). Postgraduate Medical Journal. 49: 203–209.
  2. ^ a b c d Brady, Jon (12 November 2016). "The tale of Angus Barbieri who fasted for more than a year – and lost 21 stone". Evening Telegraph. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
  3. ^ "Guinness records snub for Blaine". CNN. 4 September 2003. Retrieved 4 November 2018.