Angus Donald

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Angus Donald
Angus Donald.jpg
Born 1965
China
Occupation Novelist
Language English
Nationality British
Education Master of Arts in Social Anthropology[1]
Alma mater Marlborough College, Edinburgh University
Genre Historical fiction
Notable works Outlaw Chronicles series
Website
www.angus-donald.com

Angus Donald (born 1965 in China[2]) is a British writer of historical fiction. As of the start of 2015, he has released six books that loosely follow the story of Alan-a-Dale, and others in the series are in prospect.

Biography[edit]

Donald's parents being British diplomats, much of his childhood was spent in various places around the world, including Greece, Hong Kong, Zaire and Indonesia.[3] After graduating from Edinburgh University, Donald worked as a fruit-picker in Greece, a waiter in New York and as an "anthropologist studying magic and witchcraft" in Indonesia.[2][3] He subsequently worked as a journalist in Hong Kong, New Delhi, Pakistan, Islamabad and Afghanistan before attempting to write his first novel.[3][4][5]

Books[edit]

The Outlaw Chronicles[edit]

  1. Outlaw (2009)
  2. Holy Warrior (2010)
  3. King's Man (2011)
  4. Warlord (2012)
  5. Grail Knight (2013)
  6. The Iron Castle (2014)
  7. The King's Assassin (2015)
  8. The Death of Robin Hood (2016)

Novellas[edit]

  • The Rise of Robin Hood (2013)
  • The Betrayal of Father Tuck (2013)
  • The Hostility of Hanno (2013)

Future novels[edit]

Donald has confirmed that he plans to write a trilogy "set in Ancient Greece", and possibly further Outlaw books, set around the time of the Magna Carta.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Debbie (23 September 2011). "Interview with Angus Donald author of Outlaw - Barnes & Noble Book Clubs". Bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com. Retrieved 28 October 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "About Angus Donald « Angus Donald". Angus-donald.com. Retrieved 28 October 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c Jerelyn (2 May 2011). "Author Interview with Angus Donald « PaperBack Swap Blog". Blog.paperbackswap.com. Retrieved 28 October 2011. 
  4. ^ Donald, Angus (17 November 2001). "Freed aid workers taught Christianity to Muslims - Asia, World". The Independent. Retrieved 28 October 2011. 
  5. ^ Roberts, Martin (14 July 2010). "Novelist reinvents Robin Hood as medieval gangster | Reuters". In.reuters.com. Retrieved 28 October 2011. 

External links[edit]