Ani Couni Chaouani

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Ani Couni Chaouani (Arapaho: Ani’qu ne’chawu’nani) is a traditional Native American hymn and song originating from the Arapaho tribes living on the plains of Colorado and Wyoming in the United States.

Description[edit]

Although the vast majority of Native Americans have a tendency to appropriate the hymn, the hymn is believed to have originated from the Iroquois Nation of the Northeast.[1] However, a researcher associated with Radio-Canada discovered in 2017 that the hymn had originated from the centre of the United States,[2] more specifically from the Arapaho tribes in Colorado and Wyoming.

The hymn is seldom considered to be a lullaby. It is sung on a plaintive tone, with dancers to the hymn often crying and thinking about their condition of dependence.[1] This Native American hymn is similar[how?] to the Lord's Prayer and Hail Mary in Christianity, and the Shahada and Salat in Islam.

Lyrics[edit]

Original Phonetic Translation
Ani’qu ne’chawu’nani’,

Ani’qu ne’chawu’nani’;

Awa’wa biqāna’kaye’na,

Awa’wa biqāna’kaye’na;

Iyahu’h ni’bithi’ti,

Iyahu’h ni’bithi’ti.

Ani couni chaounani,

Ani couni chaounani;

Awawa bikana caïna,

Awawa bikana caïna;

éiaouni bissinni,

éiaouni bissinni.

Father, have mercy on me,

Father, have mercy on me;

Because I'm dying of thirst,

For I am dying of thirst;

Everything is gone - I have nothing to eat,

Everything is gone - I have nothing to eat.

Music[edit]

According to the Fourteenth annual report of the Bureau of ethnology to the secretary of the Smithsonian institution (1896), the hymn is transcribed in suit with the following notes from the original tribal version in Arapaho:[1]


\new Staff \with {
  midiInstrument = "flute"
} 
{
\relative c' {
    \tempo "Moderato"
    \key d \minor
    \time 7/4
    f8[( g8]) a4 a8[ g8] f4 a8.[( f16]) f8[( d8]) d4
    f8[( g8]) a4 a8[ g8] f4 a8.[( f16]) f8[( d8]) d4
%
    \newSpacingSection
    \time 4/4
    g4 g4 g4 a8.[ f16]
    d4 f8[( d8]) d4 d4
    g4 g4 g4 a8.[ f16]
    d4 f8[( d8]) d4 d4
%
    \newSpacingSection
    \time 3/4
    d8[ e8]
    f8[( d8]) f4 g4
    f8[( d8]) d4 d8[ e8]
    f8[( d8]) f4 g4
    f8[( d8]) d4
    \bar "|."
 }
}

\addlyrics {
  \lyricmode {
A -- ni’ -- qu ne’ -- cha -- wu’ -- na -- ni’,
A -- ni’ -- qu ne’ -- cha -- wu’ -- na -- ni’;
A -- wa’ -- wa bi -- qā -- na’ -- ka -- ye’ -- na,
A -- wa’ -- wa bi -- qā -- na’ -- ka -- ye’ -- na;

I -- ya -- hu’h ni’ -- bi -- thi’ -- ti,
I -- ya -- hu’h ni’ -- bi -- thi’ -- ti.
  }
}

\midi {
  \context {
    \Score
    tempoWholesPerMinute = #(ly:make-moment 90 4)
  }
}

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Powel 1896
  2. ^ "The story behind "Ani Kuni"". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 2017-04-02. Archived from the original on 15 December 2017.

Bibliography[edit]