Anikó Kapros

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The native form of this personal name is Kapros Anikó. This article uses the Western name order.
Anikó Kapros
Country (sports)  Hungary
Residence Budapest, Hungary
Born (1983-11-11) 11 November 1983 (age 31)
Budapest, Hungary
Height 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)
Turned pro 2000
Retired 2010
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money $US490,850
Career record 197 – 184
Career titles 0 (2 ITF)
Highest ranking No. 44 (10 May 2004)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 4R (2004)
French Open 3R (2002)
Wimbledon 3R (2003)
US Open 1R (2001, 2003, 2004)
Career record 25 – 43
Career titles 0 (5 ITF)
Highest ranking No. 222 (8 Feb 2010)
Last updated on: April 30, 2008.

Anikó Kapros (born 11 November 1983 in Budapest) is a former professional tennis player from Hungary. Kapros won the Junior's singles title at the Australian Open in 2000. She caused an upset at the French Open in 2002, when she, as a qualifier, upset 5th seeded Justine Henin-Hardenne in the first round.


Early life[edit]

Her mother, Anikó Kéry, won a bronze medal in gymnastics at the Olympic Games in Munich 1972. When Kapros was two years old, she moved to the Bahamas where her parents worked as acrobats. She returned to Hungary at the age of nine.

Professional career[edit]

In the 2002 French Open, as a qualifier, she upset future four-time French Open champion Justine Henin-Hardenne in the first round, 4-6, 6-1, 6-0. Kapros' senior career has been marred by recurring knee injuries. Her biggest success at a WTA tournament came in September 2003 when she reached the final of the Japan Open in Tokyo, where she lost to Maria Sharapova. Her highest ranking in singles was 44. Kapros was part of the Hungarian olympics team in Athens in the year of 2004.

Retired in 2010 from professional tennis. Is now the head coach and club director at Patak Party Tenisz Club in Budapest. Kapros is also the co-founder (partners with Ágnes Szavay and Zsófia Gubacsi) of Happy Tennis a company offering a special tennis program for schools and kindergarten's in Hungary.

WTA Finals[edit]

Singles: (0-1)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1. 29 Sep 2003 Japan Open Tennis Championships, Tokyo, Japan Hard Russia Maria Sharapova 6–2, 2–6, 6–7(5–7)

External links[edit]