Animalism (philosophy)

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Not to be confused with the fictional philosophy from Animal Farm, or with Animism.

In philosophy, animalism is a theory according to which we are human animals.[1] The concept of animalism is advocated by philosophers Eric T. Olson, Paul Snowdon, Stephan Blatti, and David Wiggins.[2][3][4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Eric T. Olson (2007) What are we?: a study in personal ontology, Oxford University Press, section 2.1.
  2. ^ Brian Garrett, Personal Identity and Self-Consciousness. Routledge, 1998. 137 pages. ISBN 0-415-16573-3
  3. ^ Blatti, Stephan and Snowdon, Paul (eds.) Animalism: New Essays on Persons, Animals, & Identity, Oxford University Press, 2016.
  4. ^ Snowdon, Paul Persons, Animals, Ourselves, Oxford University Press, 2017.

References[edit]

  • Baker, Lynne Rudder. 'When Does a Person Begin?', in Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller, and Jeffrey Paul (eds.), Personal Identity, Cambridge University Press, 2005
  • Blatti, Stephan, "[1]”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/animalism/>.
  • Olson, Eric T. What are we?: a study in personal ontology, Oxford University Press, 2007.