Animoto

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Animoto
Private
IndustryPhoto Slideshow Software
FoundedAugust 2006
FoundersJason Hsiao, Brad Jefferson, Stevie Clifton, Tom Clifton
Headquarters,
Websiteanimoto.com

Animoto is a cloud-based video creation service that produces video from photos, video clips, and music into video slideshows[1] and customized web-based presentations.[2] It is considered one of the scalable web applications that were developed from the early phases of cloud computing by companies with limited IT infrastructure.[3] It is available in both online and mobile platforms and offered for free and paid upgraded accounts.[4]

Animoto is based in New York City with an office in San Francisco.[5]

Company history[edit]

Animoto was founded in August 2006 by Jason Hsiao, Brad Jefferson, Steve Clifton and Tom Clifton because of the poor video quality found on the internet.[6] Animoto’s patented Cinematic Artificial Intelligence technology allows users to turn photos, video clips and music into video slideshows.[7] Animoto’s founders include former producers of ABC, MTV, VH1, Comedy Central and the Documentary Group.[8]

Animoto launched a Facebook application during the 2008 SXSW Interactive Festival. The application experienced viral growth in April 2008. According to The New York Times, by mid-April, Animoto's Facebook application had nearly 750,000 people sign up in three days. At the peak, almost 25,000 people tried Animoto in a single hour.[9] Animoto decided to use Amazon's cloud computing servers in order to meet the growing number of subscribers.[10] The surge of its growth required it to increase its previous IT infrastructure 100-fold.[3] The use of cloud services allowed it to cope with the uptick in demand but also scale back services easily and cost-efficiently when demand slackened.[3]

In June 2009, the Animoto launched an iPhone app, allowing users to create video using pictures on their mobile phone.[11]

By January 2013, the company had reached 6 million users and received a patent for its Cinematic Artificial Intelligence technology.[5]

In July 2018, the company was hacked, leading to unauthorized access of Animoto user personal information.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Animoto raises $25M to invest in mobile video creation — Tech News and Analysis
  2. ^ Esrock, Yale; Munoz, Richard; Neal, Douglas (2010). Cloud Revolution. Falls Church, VA: CSC. p. 118. ISBN 9780578051161.
  3. ^ a b c Baun, Christian; Kunze, Marcel; Nimis, Jens; Tai, Stefan (2011). Cloud Computing: Web-Based Dynamic IT Services. Heidelberg: Springer Science & Business Media. p. 63. ISBN 9783642209161.
  4. ^ Covili, Jared; Provenzano, Nicholas (2015-10-09). Classroom in the Cloud: Innovative Ideas for Higher Level Learning. Corwin Press. ISBN 9781506301662.
  5. ^ a b Animoto celebrates its fifth birthday with 6 million users
  6. ^ Animoto: The No-Infrastructure Startup | Fast Company | Business + Innovation
  7. ^ Summers, Nick. "Reporter for The Next Web". The Next Web. Retrieved 13 August 2013.
  8. ^ Wilson, Sara. "The Animoto Revolution: How this band of hipsters is taking photo sharing into the 21st century". Entrepreneur.com. Retrieved 13 August 2013.
  9. ^ Fitzgerald, Michael (May 5, 2008). "Cloud Computing: So You Don't Have to Stand Still". The New York Times. Retrieved 13 August 2013.
  10. ^ Animoto: When scalability becomes a matter of prosperity or death - The Next Web
  11. ^ Chang, Alexandra. "Animoto's new mobile app promises easy video slideshow creation". MacWorld. Retrieved 14 August 2013.
  12. ^ Whittaker, Zack (20 August 2018). "Animoto hack exposes personal information, location data". TechCrunch. Oath Inc. Retrieved 25 August 2018.