Anki (company)

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Anki
Private
IndustryRobotics and artificial intelligence
Founded2010
FounderBoris Sofman
Mark Palatucci
Hanns Tappeiner
Headquarters,
USA
ProductsAnki Cozmo
Anki Drive
Anki Vector
Anki Overdrive
Websiteanki.com

Anki is a robotics and artificial intelligence startup[1] that puts robotics technology in products for kids. Anki programs physical objects to be intelligent and adaptable in the physical world,[2][3] and aims to solve the problems of positioning, reasoning, and execution in artificial intelligence and robotics.

The company debuted Anki Drive during the 2013 Apple Worldwide Developers Conference keynote.[4]

The company received $50 million in Series A and Series B venture funding from Andreessen Horowitz, Index Ventures, and Two Sigma.[1] In September 2014, Anki announced that it has raised another $55 million in Series C venture funding led by JP Morgan. In June 2016, the company announced its latest round of funding, which amounted to $52.5M, also led by JP Morgan.[5] Total funding to date is $182.5 million. Marc Andreessen and Danny Rimer serve on the company's board, in addition to the three co-founders.[1]

History[edit]

Anki was founded by Boris Sofman, Mark Palatucci, and Hanns Tappeiner, founded officially in 2010 and is headquartered in San Francisco.[4]

Products[edit]

Anki's first product, Anki Drive, was released in Apple stores in the U.S. and Canada, on Apple.com and Anki.com starting October 23, 2013. It retails for $149.99, with additional cars available for $49.99 and Expansion Tracks for $69.99[6] Anki Drive is a racing game that combines an iOS app, called "Anki Drive," with physical race cars. Each car is equipped with optical sensors, wireless chips, motors, and artificial intelligence software. Anki OVERDRIVE was released September 2015. In October 2016, Anki launched Cozmo in the US. Cozmo is a robot about 4 inches by 3 by 2 inches. He is mostly white, with red details, and gray on the end of his robot arm. There's a light, which can shine different colors, on top of his body. There is a gray border around the edge of that light. In September 2018, Anki launched Vector, another with approximately the same dimensions as Cozmo. He is approximately the same size as Cozmo, and his design and shape are essentially the same, Except Vector is mostly black with gray details and a gold border around his light on top, which shines green by default, blue when waiting for a voice command, red when muted, light flashing orange when thinking, and orange when experiencing Wi-Fi connection difficulties. Vector uses 4 beaming microphone array to find out exactly where you are. Vector has facial recognition technology and can respond to voice commands. He is cloud connected and will update automatically. His first major update came out on December 17, 2018 which allowed Vector to connect to Amazon Alexa.[7][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Tsotsis, Alexia (June 10, 2013). "Anki Debuts Serious Robotics AI With Fun Racing Game At WWDC, Raises $50M Led By A16Z". TechCrunch. AOL Tech. Retrieved June 10, 2013.
  2. ^ Dorrier, Jason (11 June 2013). "AI STARTUP ANKI DEBUTS AT WWDC, WOWS WITH IMPRESSIVE TECH, $50 MILLION IN FUNDING". SingularityHUB. Retrieved 13 June 2013.
  3. ^ Terdiman, Daniel (10 June 2013). "Anki, blessed by Apple, takes AI and robotics to consumers". CNET. Retrieved 13 June 2013.
  4. ^ a b Fiegerman, Seth (11 June 2013). "Startup's Dream of Launching at an Apple Event". Mashable. Retrieved 13 June 2013.
  5. ^ "Subscribe to read". www.ft.com. Retrieved 2017-01-10.
  6. ^ "Anki announces release date for Anki Drive robotic race cars".
  7. ^ "Vector Changelog and Known Issues". Retrieved 2019-01-06.
  8. ^ Eadicicco, Lisa. "Artificial Intelligence Invades the Home ... In Toys".

External links[edit]