Anníe Mist Þórisdóttir

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Anníe Mist Þórisdóttir
Annie Thorisdottir.jpg
Personal information
Nickname(s) Iceland Annie
Thor's Daughter
Born (1989-09-18) 18 September 1989 (age 27)
Reykjavík, Iceland
Residence Kópavogur, Iceland
Occupation Professional CrossFit Athlete
Years active 2009–present
Height 5 ft 7 in (1.70 m)
Weight 148 lb (67 kg)
Sport
Sport CrossFit, Olympic weightlifting
Coached by Jami Tikkanen
Achievements and titles
World finals 2-time CrossFit Games champion ('11, '12)
2-time CrossFit Games silver medalist ('10, '14)
Regional finals 2-time Open worldwide champion ('11, '15)
4-time Europe Regional champion ('10, '11, '12, '14)
6-time CrossFit Games qualifier ('09, '10, '11, '12, '14, '15)
Personal best(s)
  • Backsquat: 253 lb (115 kg)
  • Clean and Jerk: 205 lb (93 kg)
  • Snatch: 176 lb (80 kg)
  • Deadlift: 363 lb (165 kg)
  • Fran 2:37
  • Grace 1:29
  • Filthy 50 15:07
  • Isabel 1:29
  • Elizabeth 4:24
  • Randy 2:29
  • Diane 1:54

Anníe Mist Þórisdóttir (often featured as Annie Thorisdottir in international media) is a professional CrossFit athlete from Reykjavík, Iceland.[1][2][3][4] She is the co-owner of Crossfit Reykjavik, where she also coaches and trains.[5]

Anníe is the first woman to win the CrossFit Games twice (in 2011 and 2012). She placed second in the 2010 and 2014 CrossFit Games.[6] She did not compete in 2013 due to injury,[7] and dropped out of the 2015 CrossFit Games early due to heat stroke.

Anníe trains four hours per day, six days per week, and also has experience as a gymnast (eight years), ballet dancer (two years), and pole vaulter (two years).[8] She is 170 cm (5'7") tall, weighs approximately 67 kg (148 lbs), and hopes to go into the medical field.[9]

CrossFit Games Career[edit]

Anníe first appeared in the sport of CrossFit in July 2009, when she traveled from Reykjavik to Aromas, California to compete at the third annual CrossFit Games. She had been taking "bootcamp" classes but had only a month of CrossFit experience. Anníe finished five of the eight events within the top 10 (out of 70 competitors), including an event win on the Sandbag Sprint[10] (1:07.4) and fourth-place finishes on the Sledge Hammer Drive (5:56) and the Triplet (86).[11] On the final day of competition, an event called "The Chipper"[12] was announced that included ring muscle-ups. With no exposure to this men's gymnastics movement, Anníe attempted to learn the movement before going out on the competition floor with the help of coaches and fellow athletes to no avail. On the competition floor, Anníe completed the 15 cleans (100-lb.), 30 toes-to-bar, and 30 box jumps (20 inches) before reaching the 15 muscle-ups. She attempted the muscle-up many times unsuccessfully before finally getting one rep in front of the cheering crowds. She earned a DNF on the event, and dropped in the overall standings to 11th, but made herself known as a contender for the title of "Fittest on Earth."

In 2010, the Games had moved from Aromas, California, to the Home Depot Center in Carson, California. After the 2010 Europe Regional, she picked up a coach, Jami Tikkanen, and worked on competition strategy.[13] The 2010 Games went down as a competition between Kristan Clever and Anníe. Clever accumulated five event wins and three 2nd-place finishes to Anníe's four event wins, one 2nd, and one third. Anníe could now do muscle-ups, which was important since that skill/strength was thoroughly tested in the opening event, "Amanda" (a workout consisting of 9-7-5 repetitions of muscle-ups and 95-lb. snatches), where she took 12th with a time of 12:07. Once again, Anníe excelled at grunt work with sandbags winning the "Sandbag Move," and won other events such as "Pyramid Double Helen," "Deadlift/Pistol/Double-under," and "Wall Burpee/Rope Climb." She finished the Games in second place behind Clever.

Annie Thorisdottir during the Skills Test at the 2011 Games.

In 2011, Anníe was dominant. She won every stage of the CrossFit Games season beginning with the inaugural worldwide Open (1st, worldwide), and continuing through the Europe Regional and the Games. Anníe surpassed 2010 Games champion Kristan Clever by a margin of 43 points thanks to top 5 finishes on 8 of the 10 events, including three event wins (Rope/Clean, Skills 2, Dog-Sled) and four third-place finishes (Killer Kage, The End 1, The End 2, The End 3). Anníe shared the podium with Clever (2nd overall) and Rebecca Voigt (3rd overall).

In 2012, Anníe and Rich Froning Jr. became the first athletes to win the CrossFit Games twice.

In 2013, Anníe was not able to defend her title due to a back injury (a herniated disc)[7] sustained while too casually lifting heavy weight. She withdrew during the third week of the five-week Open. At the time, she said she could not do basic movements like squatting without weight. She questioned whether she could ever walk again[14] and spent the rest of the year recovering.

She entered the 2014 season notably less confident than she had appeared in past seasons. In her first live competitive appearance since her injury, Open Announcement 14.5 in San Francisco, Anníe trailed far behind the other champions, Sam Briggs, Rich Froning, Jason Khalipa, and Graham Holmberg,[15] and received the high-fives of her competitors at the end of the workout while shaking her head in apparent disappointment. Any athlete that thought there was blood in the water was proven wrong in the next two stages of the season, however. Anníe went on to win the 2014 Europe Regional, while 2013 Games champion Sam Briggs of England failed to qualify (4th overall) due to a poor performance on the max distance handstand walk. At the 2014 Games, Anníe had a slow start with event finishes in the teens and 20s, but as the weekend progressed Anníe appeared to have lost her hesitancy and guarding, as she bagged top 10 finishes including 1st - 2nd - 1st on the final three events.

In 2015, she won the worldwide Open for a second time before taking a third at the new, combined Meridian Regional (the top 30 athletes from Europe and top 10 from Africa competed together in Copenhagen for five qualifying spots to the Games). This was her lowest Regional finish to date, as the four-time Europe Regional champion.

In the third event of the 2015 Games, Murph (1 mile run, 100 pull-ups, 200 push-ups, 300 air squats, 1 mile run all completed with a weighted vest), Anníe got heat stroke. She tried to continue to compete, but decided to withdraw before the final three events on Sunday.[16] Even so, two of the three women who finished on the podium, champion Katrin Davidsdottir and Sara Sigmundsdottir in third place, were Icelandic (the third-place finisher in the men's individual competition, Björgvin Karl Guðmundsson, is also from Iceland).

CrossFit Games results[edit]

Year Games Regionals Open (Worldwide)
2009 11th[17]
2010 2nd[18] 1st (Europe)[19]
2011 1st[20] 1st (Europe)[6] 1st[21]
2012[6] 1st 1st (Europe) 3rd
2013 Did not compete*
2014[6] 2nd 1st (Europe) 28th
2015[6] 38th* 3rd (Meridian) 1st
2016 13th 2nd (Meridian) 10th
2017 3rd (Meridian) 7th
*Withdrew

Other athletic accomplishments[edit]

Anníe placed first for women at the 2013 Dubai Fitness Competition, taking away more than Dh650,000 ($177,000) in prize money.[22][23] She defeated NFL running back Justin Forsett in a push-up contest while returning from a back injury.[24] Anníe competed in the D group of the 2015 International Weightlifting Federation (IWF) World Championships. In the 69kg weight class, she lifted 88kg in the Snatch and 108kg in the Clean & Jerk for a final total of 196kg placing 35th at a bodyweight of 68.05kg.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Annie Mist vill koma til greina sem Íþróttamaður ársins". DV. Retrieved 11 March 2015. 
  2. ^ "Viðskiptablaðið - Annie Mist tekjuhæsti íþróttamaðurinn". vb.is. Retrieved 11 March 2015. 
  3. ^ Pressan.is „Ég er búin að vinna nánast allt“ - Þess vegna varð Annie Mist ekki íþróttamaður ársins 6 January 2012
  4. ^ RUV Annie Mist: „Þetta er dýrt" (interview Icelandic) Archived September 27, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. 22 September 2013
  5. ^ "CrossFit Games Champion Annie Thorisdottir: The Fittest Woman in the World". Vogue. Retrieved 11 March 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c d e "CrossFit Leader board final". Retrieved 2014-07-27. 
  7. ^ a b "Thorisdottir Sidelined by Back Injury". Games.Crossfit.com. 2013-03-28. Retrieved 2013-07-14. 
  8. ^ "Fittest Woman On Earth". Annie Thorisdottir. Archived from the original on 2013-05-18. Retrieved 2013-07-14. 
  9. ^ CrossFit Games. "Athlete: Annie Thorisdottir | CrossFit Games". Games.crossfit.com. Retrieved 2013-07-14. 
  10. ^ "Part 14: Sandbag Sprint - Women’s 09 Games by Carey Peterson". CrossFit Journal. Retrieved 2015-10-09. 
  11. ^ "Part 18: Triplet - Women’s 09 Games by Carey Peterson". CrossFit Journal. Retrieved 2015-10-09. 
  12. ^ "Part 19: The Chipper - Women’s 09 Games by Carey Peterson". CrossFit Journal. Retrieved 2015-10-09. 
  13. ^ 2010 CrossFit Games - Interview with Annie Thorisdottir, retrieved 2015-10-09 
  14. ^ "Iceland Annie's fight back to the top of the CrossFit Games". SI.com. Retrieved 2015-10-09. 
  15. ^ "Open Announcement 14.5: Archived Footage". CrossFit Games. Retrieved 2015-10-09. 
  16. ^ "Annie Thorisdottir Withdraws on the Final Day of the 2015 CrossFit Games". The Rx Review. July 26, 2015. 
  17. ^ "2009 Women's Overall Results". games2009.crossfit.com. Retrieved 2015-10-09. 
  18. ^ "2010 CrossFit Games Finals Overall Results (Women)". scores2010.crossfit.com. Retrieved 2015-10-09. 
  19. ^ "Europe Regional Overall Results (Women)". scores2010.crossfit.com. Retrieved 2015-10-09. 
  20. ^ "2011 CrossFit Games Female". games2011.crossfit.com. Retrieved 2015-10-09. 
  21. ^ "Scoreboard CrossFit Games". games2011.crossfit.com. Retrieved 2015-10-09. 
  22. ^ "International athletes muscle in on Dubai fitness competition". TheNational.com. Retrieved 2013-07-14. 
  23. ^ "Defending CrossFit Games champion Annie Thorisdottir is fit to rule". espnW. Retrieved 11 March 2015. 
  24. ^ Bric, John Michael. "CrossFit vs NFL: Thorisdottir Takes on NFL Running Back". TheRxReview.com. Retrieved 26 October 2014. 

External links[edit]