Ann-Renée Desbiens

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Ann-Renée Desbiens
AnnReneeDesbiens.jpg
Ann-Renee Desbiens playing for Team Canada in 2017
Born (1994-04-10) April 10, 1994 (age 27)
La Malbaie, Quebec, Canada
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Weight 73 kg (161 lb; 11 st 7 lb)
Position Goaltender
Catches Left
PWHPA team
Former teams
Montreal
PWHPA Minnesota
Wisconsin Badgers
Montréal Stars
National team  Canada
Playing career 2013–present

Ann-Renée Desbiens (born April 10, 1994) is a Canadian ice hockey goaltender and member of the Canadian national ice hockey team, currently affiliated with the Montreal chapter of the Professional Women's Hockey Players Association (PWHPA).

She participated at the 2015 IIHF Women's World Championship[1] and the 2018 Winter Olympics.[2]

Playing career[edit]

Desbiens was the first female player drafted to the Quebec Junior AAA Hockey League, the second-highest men's junior league in Québec after the QMJHL. She was selected by the Loups de La Tuque but was cut before ever playing a game because the coach didn't believe there was any point in developing girls.[3] That same year, she participated in the Shawinigan Cataractes training camp.[4]

She made one playoff appearance for the Montréal Stars of the Canadian Women's Hockey League (CWHL) in 2012, as the team won the Clarkson Cup.

NCAA[edit]

In 2013, she was offered a scholarship to play at the University of Wisconsin in the NCAA, despite not being fluent in English. Across four years with the Wisconsin Badgers women's ice hockey program, she led the team to four Frozen Four appearances, tallied 99 wins in 122 games, and set a number of individual records, including highest career save percentage (SV%), at .963, and lowest goals against average (GAA), with 0.71.

During her senior year, on November 6, 2016, Desbiens broke Noora Räty's record for most NCAA career shutouts of any gender. In a 6–0 shutout victory against the Bemidji State Beavers, Desbiens would log career shutout number 44.[5] At the end of her senior year, Desbiens was awarded the Patty Kazmaier Award as the top female college ice hockey player in the United States.[6]

Desbiens was the first Canadian selected at the 2016 NWHL Draft, chosen in the first round, fourth overall by the Boston Pride.[7][8][9] As of 2021, she has not appeared with the team nor made any indication of interest in playing in the NWHL.

After the 2018 Olympics, during the 2018-19 season, Desbiens took a break from hockey, citing exhaustion and the uncertainty of options to play professionally.[10][11] In May 2019, she returned to hockey by joining the PWHPA.

In the 2019–20 season, Desbiens appeared for the Fond du Lac Bears in the Great Lakes Hockey League, an elite men's amateur league. She also participated in the women's ice hockey showcase at the 2020 NHL All-Star Game, making 15 saves as the Canadian All-Stars beat the American All-Stars.[12]

PWHPA[edit]

Standing between the pipes for Team Bauer (Montreal) in the 2021 Secret Cup, which was the Canadian leg of the 2020–21 PWHPA Dream Gap Tour, Ann-Renee Desbiens registered 19 saves in a 4-2 championship game win over Team Sonnet (Toronto).[13]

International play[edit]

Desbiens was selected to play for Team Canada at the 2015 IIHF Women's World Championship where she guided Canada to a silver medal.[2] She was also selected to play for Team Canada at the 2018 Winter Olympics where she again won a silver medal.[2]

On January 11, 2022, Desbiens was named to Canada's 2022 Olympic team.[14][15][16]

Personal life[edit]

Desbiens has a master's degree in accounting.[17][18] She has named NHL goaltender Patrick Roy as a role model, her family being supporters of the Quebec Nordiques and then the Colorado Avalanche.[19]

Awards and honours[edit]

  • WCHA Player of the Week (Recognized for games of November 4–6, 2016) [20]
  • 2016 WCHA Player of the Year [21]
  • WCHA Offensive Player of the Month, January 2017[22]
  • WCHA Defensive Player of the Week (Week of February 14, 2017) [23]
  • 2016-17 AHCA-CCM Women's University Division I All-American [24]
  • 2017 Patty Kazmaier Award winner[6]

Statistics[edit]

NCAA[edit]

   
Season Team League GP MIN GA SV Shots SV % GAA W L T
2013–14 Wisconsin Badgers NCAA 12 677:52 12 265 277 .957 1.06 11 1 0
2014–15 Wisconsin Badgers NCAA 37 2236:55 43 684 727 .941 1.15 26 7 4
2015–16 Wisconsin Badgers NCAA 38 2279:18 29 701 730 .960 0.76 33 4 1
2016–17 Wisconsin Badgers NCAA 35 2115:52 25 645 670 .963 0.71 29 2 4
NCAA Totals 122 7309:57 109 2295 2404 .955 0.89 99 14 9

Statistics source:[25]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2015 IIHF World Championship roster" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on February 12, 2018. Retrieved December 30, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "Ann-Renée Desbiens". olympic.ca. Retrieved April 17, 2018.
  3. ^ Lavoie, Kathleen (October 21, 2017). "Ann-Renée Desbiens, la muraille canadienne". Le Soleil (in French). Retrieved May 13, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ "Ann-Renée Desbiens à la croisée des chemins – Photo Pierre Rochette".
  5. ^ "Wisconsin women's hockey: Ann-Renée Desbiens breaks NCAA shutout record in win". WCHA.com. November 8, 2016. Retrieved November 25, 2016.
  6. ^ a b "Ann-Renee Desbiens Wins 20th Patty Kaz Award". pattykaz.com. March 18, 2017. Retrieved April 17, 2018.
  7. ^ Wells, Nathan (June 18, 2016). "WCHA Players Dominate 2016 NWHL Draft". SB Nation College Hockey. Retrieved June 19, 2016.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. ^ Shircliff, Elaine (September 1, 2016). "Meet the 2016 Boston Pride Draftees". The Hockey Writers. Retrieved April 17, 2018.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ Bevis, Hannah (September 28, 2017). "Women's Hockey Top 25 Under 25 | Number 2 - Ann-Renée Desbiens". The Ice Garden. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  10. ^ Lorange, Simon-Olivier (January 30, 2020). "Ann-Renée Desbiens: "On n'est pas habituées à ça !"". La Presse (in French). Retrieved May 13, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. ^ Rioux, Benoît (November 28, 2019). "Ann-Renée Desbiens : la "barbare" de La Malbaie". Le Journal de Montréal. Retrieved May 13, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  12. ^ Woodley, Kevin (February 6, 2020). "Desbiens getting chance in goal for Canada". NHL.com. Retrieved May 13, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  13. ^ "Team Bauer beats Team Sonnet to win Canadian leg of PWHPA Secret Dream Gap Tour". sportsnet.ca. May 30, 2021. Retrieved June 1, 2021.
  14. ^ Awad, Brandi (January 11, 2022). "Team Canada's women's hockey roster revealed for Beijing 2022". Canadian Olympic Committee. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  15. ^ "Canada's 2022 Olympic women's hockey team roster". Canadian Press. Toronto, Ontario, Canada. January 11, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  16. ^ "2022 Olympic Winter Games (Women)". www.hockeycanada.ca/. Hockey Canada. January 11, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  17. ^ "WCHA 20th Anniversary Team - Ann-Renée Desbiens, Wisconsin". Western Collegiate Hockey Association. Retrieved May 13, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  18. ^ Murphy, Connor (August 25, 2018). "2018 Women's Hockey Top 25 Under 25 | No. 7: Ann-Renée Desbiens". The Ice Garden. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  19. ^ Tardif, Carl (February 18, 2018). "20 questions à... Ann-Renée Desbiens". Le Soleil (in French). Retrieved May 13, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  20. ^ "UMN'S PANNEK, AND UW'S DESBIENS AND ROQUE NAMED WCHA WOMEN'S PLAYERS OF THE WEEK". WCHA.com. November 8, 2016. Retrieved November 25, 2016.
  21. ^ "WCHA ANNOUNCES 2015–16 POSTSEASON AWARDS". WCHA.com. March 3, 2016. Retrieved November 25, 2016.
  22. ^ "UMD's Stalder, UW's Desbiens And OSU's Dunne Named WCHA Women's Players of the Month". WCHA ice hockey. February 3, 2017. Retrieved February 9, 2017.
  23. ^ "UW'S WELLHAUSEN, DESBIENS AND ROQUE NAMED WCHA WOMEN'S PLAYERS OF THE WEEK: Players honored for games of February 10 – 12, 2017". WCHA ice hockey. February 14, 2017. Retrieved February 17, 2017.
  24. ^ "2017 All-American Teams". ahcahockey.com. Retrieved May 13, 2021.
  25. ^ "Ann-Renee Desbiens: Career Statistics". USCHO.com. Retrieved November 25, 2016.

External links[edit]