Ann Fisher-Wirth

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Ann Fisher-Wirth (born January 25, 1947 as Ann Carolyn Welpton) is an American poet and scholar.[1]

Biography[edit]

Fisher-Wirth is the daughter of a career Army officer and an English teacher.[2] She was born in Washington, D. C., and lived as a child in Germany, Pennsylvania, and Japan before her father retired from the Army and her parents decided to move to Berkeley, California.[3] She earned a B.A. degree, magna cum laude, in English from Pomona College in 1968;[1] an M.A. degree in English and American literature from Claremont Graduate School in 1972;[1] and a Ph.D. in English and American literature from Claremont Graduate School in 1981.[1] Her scholarly work has concentrated primarily on William Carlos Williams and Willa Cather, but she has published on other writers including Cormac McCarthy, Louise Gluck, Robert Hass, and Anita Brookner.[1] She has served as President of the international Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE), has had a senior Fulbright to the University of Fribourg, Switzerland, and has held the Fulbright Distinguished Chair at Uppsala University, Sweden.[2] She has been teaching at the University of Mississippi since 1988.[1] She has won several teaching awards, including Liberal Arts Outstanding Teacher of the Year (2006), Humanities Teacher of the Year (2007), and the Elsie M. Hood Award (2014).[4] Her poetry has received numerous awards, including several Pushcart nominations and a Pushcart Special Mention.[2] She is married to Peter Wirth.[3] Her daughter, Jessica Fisher, is also a poet.

Selected Works[edit]

  • First, earth, The Chapbook (2015)
  • The Ecopoetry Anthology, coedited with Laura-Gray Street, Trinity University Press (2013)
  • Dream Cabinet, Wings Press (2012)
  • Carta Marina, Wings Press (2009)
  • Slide Shows, Finishing Line Press (2009)
  • Five Terraces, Wind Publications (2005)
  • Walking Wu-Wei's Scroll, Drunken Boat (2005),
  • Blue Window, Archer Books (2003)
  • The Trinket Poems, Wind Publications (2003)
  • William Carlos Williams and Autobiography: The Woods of His Own Nature, Penn State University Press (1989)

Selected Honors and Awards[edit]

  • The Elsie M. Hood Outstanding Teaching Award, University of Mississippi (2014)[4]
  • Finalist, Poet Laureate of Mississippi (2012)[2]
  • University of Mississippi Humanities Teacher of the Year (2007)[4]
  • University of Mississippi Liberal Arts Outstanding Teacher of the Year (2006)[4]
  • President, Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (2006)[5]
  • Literary Artist Fellowship for poetry from the Mississippi Arts Commission (2005)[6]
  • Writing Residency, Djerassi Resident Artists Program in Woodside, Calif. (2005)[6]
  • Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Poetry Award (2004)[7]
  • Rita Dove Poetry Award from the Salem College Center for Women Writers (2004)[6]
  • Malahat Review Long Poem Prize (2003)[6]
  • Fulbright Distinguished Chair of American Studies, Uppsala University, Sweden (2003) [5]
  • Literary Artist Fellowship for poetry from the Mississippi Arts Commission (1998)[8]
  • Fulbright Lecturer in American Literature, University of Fribourg, Switzerland (1994)[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Ann Fisher-Wirth". University of Mississippi–M.F.A. English. Retrieved 4 March 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Ann Fisher-Wirth". Black Earth Institute. Retrieved 4 March 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "Q&A With Ann Fisher-Wirth". Bloom: “Late” according to whom?. March 25, 2015. Retrieved 4 March 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Ann Fisher-Wirth Teacher of the Year". The University of Mississippi – College of Liberal Arts. Retrieved 7 March 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c "Dr. Ann Fisher-Wirth". Association of Writers and Writing Programs. Retrieved 7 March 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c d "English professor, poet Ann Fisher-Wirth awarded state arts commission grant". The Mississippi Writers Page. Retrieved 7 March 2016. 
  7. ^ "Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters". Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters. Retrieved 7 March 2016. 
  8. ^ "Arts Commission News". Mississippi Arts Commission. Retrieved 7 March 2016. 

External links[edit]