Ann Jillian (TV series)

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Ann Jillian
Ann jillian tv series premiere print ad.jpg
Series premiere print advertisement
Genre Sitcom
Created by Deidre Fay
Stuart Wolpert
Starring Ann Jillian
Lisa Rieffel
Amy Lynne
Zachary Rosencrantz
Noble Willingham
Chantal Rivera-Batisse
Cynthia Harris
Composer(s) Ray Colcord
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 13 (3 unaired)
Production
Running time 30 minutes
Production company(s) 9-J Inc. Productions
Castle Rock Entertainment
Distributor Warner Bros. Television Distribution
Release
Original network NBC
Original release November 30, 1989 – August 19, 1990

Ann Jillian is an American sitcom starring Ann Jillian that aired on NBC from November 30, 1989 to August 19, 1990.[1]

Plot[edit]

After the death of her firefighter husband, Ann McNeil, an ex-Radio City Music Hall Rockette, and her 14-year-old daughter Lucy, move from New York to a small northern California village,[2] named Marvel, where Ann and her husband went for their honeymoon. Lucy is apprehensive of her new surroundings in a new town and at first misses the fast-paced atmosphere of New York City, but she begins to adjust and makes new friends. Ann is also learning to adjust as well as she starts a new job at a gift shop run by Mrs. Hufnagel. The teens that Lucy hangs out with were Kaz, Melissa, and Robin. Kaz's well-meaning grandfather, Duke, helped Ann and Lucy in their new surroundings.

Cast and characters[edit]

Production[edit]

The pilot for the series was produced in early 1989, when it was called The Ann Jillian Show.[3] It was canceled on August 19, 1990, with the last episode airing on September 1, 1990.[citation needed]

At the time the pilot for the series was produced, Castle Rock Entertainment, which produced the show, also had another pilot produced for NBC named The Seinfeld Chronicles starring stand-up comedian Jerry Seinfeld. When it tested poorly, and Ann Jillian tested more positively, Castle Rock committed to Jillian's series, which was picked up for a full season order. However, the show would only last one season, whereas the subsequently re-titled Seinfeld lasted for nine seasons, ending in 1998.[4]

Episodes[edit]

No.Title [5]Directed by [5]Original air dateProd.
code [5]
1"California Dreamin'"John BowabNovember 30, 1989 (1989-11-30)03-0101
2"Interrupted Melody"John BowabDecember 3, 1989 (1989-12-03)03-0102
3"Love-15"John BowabDecember 10, 1989 (1989-12-10)03-0105
4"Since I Don't Have You"John BowabDecember 17, 1989 (1989-12-17)03-0108
5"Buddy System"John BowabDecember 31, 1989 (1989-12-31)03-0103
6"Career Week"
"Shoots and Ladders"[citation needed]
John BowabJanuary 7, 1990 (1990-01-07)03-0107
7"The Crush"John BowabJanuary 20, 1990 (1990-01-20)03-0109
8"Run for the Roses"John BowabAugust 5, 1990 (1990-08-05)03-0111
9"Old Friends"John BowabAugust 12, 1990 (1990-08-12)03-0112
10"It's a Mall World After All"John BowabAugust 19, 1990 (1990-08-19)03-0113
Note: This episode, the last produced, effectively served as a "pilot" to a rebooted version of the series – from this episode forward, the focus of the series would have shifted to Ann McNeil's new job as the activities director of the local Marvel shopping mall and the characters she worked with there.[6]
11"Good Citizen"John BowabUnaired03-0104
12"A Housewarming"John BowabUnaired03-0106
13"The Anniversary"John BowabUnaired03-0110

Reception[edit]

Howard Rosenberg of Los Angeles Times reviewed the comedy negatively, quipping that the series "has more Anns than laughs."[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tim Brooks; Earle Marsh (2003). "Ann Jillian (Situation Comedy)". The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows 1946–Present (8th ed.). New York: Ballantine Books. p. 59. ISBN 978-0-345-45542-0. 
  2. ^ Vernon Scott (November 27, 1989). "New, Improved and Funnier Ann Jillian Launches TV Assault". Los Angeles Times. United Press International. Retrieved 2017-06-17. 
  3. ^ Diane Haithman (March 24, 1989). "TV Pilots Ready for an Air War". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2017-06-17. 
  4. ^ Freeman, Marc (May 13, 2018). "'Seinfeld' Finale at 20: Hidden Tales From the Vault of a Comedian's Bizarro World". Encyclopedia of Things. Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved May 16, 2018. Castle Rock, which owned the series, had two pilots at NBC that year: Seinfeld and one with Ann Jillian. Whereas Seinfeld tested poorly, Ann Jillian tested through the roof and earned a 13-episode commitment. Castle Rock decided to focus on that. 
  5. ^ a b c From the United States Copyright Office catalog: "Public Catalog - Copyright Catalog (1978 to present) - Basic Search [search: "Ann Jillian"]"". United States Copyright Office. Retrieved 2017-06-17. 
  6. ^ Vincent Terrace (February 12, 2013). "The Ann Jillian Show". Encyclopedia of Television Pilots, 1937–2012. McFarland. p. 184. ISBN 978-1-476-60249-3. 
  7. ^ Howard Rosenberg (November 30, 1989). "TV REVIEWS : More Anns, Fewer Laughs in NBC's 'Ann Jillian'". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2017-06-17. 

External links[edit]