Ann McNamee

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Ann McNamee
Ann McNamee.jpg
Ann McNamee performing with her band Ann Atomic at Lilith Fair, Comcast Center, Great Woods, Mansfield, MA on Aug. 3 2010.
Background information
Birth name Ann Kosakowski
Born (1953-05-21) May 21, 1953 (age 62)
Southbridge, Massachusetts
Origin United States
Genres Indie rock, indie pop, alternative rock
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter, Professor Emerita (Swarthmore College)
Instruments Voice, Piano, Keyboards, Hand Percussion, Bass
Associated acts Ann Atomic, Moonalice
Website annmcamee.com

Ann Kosakowski McNamee (Southbridge, Massachusetts, May 21, 1953) is a musical theorist and singer/songwriter based in San Francisco, CA and a retired Professor Emerita of Music at Swarthmore College[1] notable for her contribution to music theory; her song writing; and her musical performances with the bands the Flying Other Brothers and Moonalice[2] known for their cutting edge technology,[3] particularly in the area of social media,[4] as well as their performances at festivals such as Hardly Strictly Bluegrass,[5] Nateva,[6] Summer Camp Music Festival,[7] Oregon Country Fair,[8] Gathering of the Vibes;[9] and with her band Ann Atomic during the 2010 revival of Lilith Fair.[10]

Contribution to music theory[edit]

She is the author of highly cited academic work in music theory, specifically on bitonality, mode and interval in the music of Karol Szymanowski,[11] the role of the piano introduction in Franz Schubert's Lieder,[12] and the octave expansion and sonata form of Grażyna Bacewicz's Second Piano Sonata.[13]

She has been cited by Allen Forte, co-winner of the 1997 Wallace Berry Distinguished Book Award of the Society for Music Theory for her significant contribution to his 1995 book, "The American Popular Ballad of the Golden Era, 1924-1950: A Study in Musical Design.".[14] Dave Headlam, winner of the 1997 Deems Taylor award in the Symphonic Books category of the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP), cited her for her contribution on interval cycles in Karol Szymanowski's works, in his 1996 book “The Music of Alban Berg”.[15] Kristine H. Burns in her 2002 book, "Women and Music in America Since 1900: An Encyclopedia [Two Volumes]" cited her for her work on the music of Franz Schubert and Karol Szymanowski.[16] She has also been cited in reviews of music in the 2004 edition of “New Historical Anthology of Music by Women” edited by James R. Briscoe.[17]

Contribution to music's digital revolution[edit]

McNamee is the co-writer of the Moonalice song "It's 4:20 Somewhere".[18] Putnam, Moonalice, and the lyrics of the song were referenced in the 2011 book, "The Fall of the House of Forbes: The Inside Story of the Collapse of a Media Empire" by Stewart Pinkerton.[19] In August 2012 the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announced that the digital logs for "It’s 4:20 Somewhere" had been acquired for its library and archives, describing the Moonalice logs as helping to "...tell the story of music’s digital revolution; specifically the rise of direct-from-artist (DFA) distribution. Moonalice is the first band without a label to achieve one million downloads of a song from its own servers, direct-from-artist. “It’s 4:20 Somewhere” has been downloaded over three million times".[20]

Personal[edit]

She has a B.A. in Music from Wellesley (1975) and a Ph.D. in Music Theory from Yale University (1980).[21] She has been married to the venture capitalist Roger McNamee since 1983 and with her husband is a co-founder of the Ndovo Foundation.[22] now known as the Tembo Preserve[23] and the Haight Street Art Center which will be run as a co-op for artists and will include a fine art print shop as well as exhibition space.[24] Having retired from performing with Moonalice in October 2012 to pursue a career in musical theater,[25] she is writing a musical, Love Bytes, together with Roger Love.[26] Six of the songs from Love Bytes were performed during a public performance in October 2012.[27] She is collaborating on a second musical, Other World, with Hunter Bell, Stephen Oremus, Gabriel Barre, and Sammy James, Jr., and has been invited to develop the project as part of the Johnny Mercer Writers Colony at Goodspeed Musicals. [28]

Discography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Swarthmore College Catalog. "Faculty and Other Instructional Staff". Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  2. ^ McNamee, Roger. "Give It Away". What The Co-Founder Of Elevation Learned From The Jam Scene. Billboard. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  3. ^ Juregesen, John. "The Tech Investor Is With The Band". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  4. ^ Raymundo, Oscar. "Moonalice Singer Delivers Yale Lecture on Social Media for Bands". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  5. ^ SFGate (27 September 2012). "Hardly Strictly Bluegrass fest's lineup". Arrow Stage (SFGate). Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  6. ^ McLennan, Scott (6 July 2010). "Nateva plants musical roots in Maine". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  7. ^ Hatch, Danielle. "Claypool on board as Summer Camp moves forward". Journal Star. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  8. ^ Heuston, Laurie. "From the big top". Cast of Clowns' lineup shapes an ace jam band. Mail Tribune. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  9. ^ Horyczun, MIke. "Sound Surfing". TheHour Online. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  10. ^ Kaufman, Gil. "Lilith Fair To Feature Mary J. Blige, Colbie Caillat, Jill Scott, More". Erykah Badu, Chairlift, Corinne Bailey Rae, Ke$ha and Metric also onboard. MTV. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  11. ^ McNamee, Ann. "Bitonality, Mode and Interval in the Music of Karol Szymanowski". Vol. 29, No. 1, Spring, 1985 (Journal of Music Theory). JSTOR 843371. 
  12. ^ McNamee, Ann. "The Role of the Piano Introduction in Schubert's Lieder". Vol. 4, No. 1/2, Mar. - Jul. 1985 (Journal of Music Theory). JSTOR 854237. 
  13. ^ McNamee, Ann. "Grazyna Bacewicz's Second Piano Sonata (1953): Octave Expansion and Sonata Form". Volume 0, Number 4 September 1993. Music Theory Online. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  14. ^ Forte, Alan. The American Popular Ballad of the Golden Area: 1924-1950. Princeton University Press. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  15. ^ Headlam, David John. The Music of Alban Berg. Yale University Press. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  16. ^ Burns, Kristine Helen. Women and music in America since 1900: an encyclopedia, Volume 2. Greenwood Press. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  17. ^ Briscoe, James R. "New Historical Anthology of Music by Women" (PDF). New Historical Anthology of Music by Women (review). Indiana University Press. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  18. ^ Moonalice. "It's 4:20 Somewhere". Moonalice.com. 
  19. ^ Pinkerton, Stewart. The Fall of the House of Forbes: The Inside Story of the Collapse of a Media Empire. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  20. ^ Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. "Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Announces Acquisition of Digital Logs of Moonalice's "It's 4:20 Somewhere" for Library and Archives". Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  21. ^ Swarthmore College Catalog. "Faculty an Other Instructional Staff". Retrieved 26 December 2013. 
  22. ^ Daily News Business. "Tehama County supes hear plan for elephant reserve". Retrieved 26 December 2013. 
  23. ^ Red Bluff Daily News. "Tembo Preserve representatives give education presentation to local youth". 
  24. ^ Siber, Kate. "The Long, Strange—and Profoundly Prescient—Trip of Roger McNamee". Tuck at Dartmouth Newsroom. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved 1 February 2015. 
  25. ^ Moonalice. "Onward. A Celebration Of Ann McNamee". Retrieved 27 December 2013. 
  26. ^ New Musical News. "The surprise hit musical is back". Academy For New Musical Theater. Retrieved 27 December 2013. 
  27. ^ Moonalice. "Onward. A Celebration Of Ann McNamee". Retrieved 27 December 2013. 
  28. ^ BroadwayWorld.com. "Tony & Grammy Winners Among Participants for Goodspeed's Johnny Mercer Writers Colony". 
  29. ^ McNamee, Ann. "Discography". annmcnamee.com. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  30. ^ McNamee, Ann. "Discography". annmcnamee.com. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  31. ^ McNamee, Ann. "Discography". annmcnamee.com. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  32. ^ McNamee, Ann. "Discography". annmcnamee.com. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  33. ^ McNamee, Ann. "Discography". annmcnamee.com. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  34. ^ McNamee, Ann. "Discography". annmcnamee.com. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  35. ^ McNamee, Ann. "Discography". annmcnamee.com. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  36. ^ McNamee, Ann. "Discography". annmcnamee.com. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  37. ^ McNamee, Ann. "Discography". annmcnamee.com. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  38. ^ McNamee, Ann. "Discography". annmcnamee.com. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 

External links[edit]

  • www.annmcnamee.com [1]

Request for a new review[edit]