Ann Z. Caracristi

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Ann Z. Caracristi
CaracristiPortrait.jpg
9th Deputy Director of the National Security Agency
In office
April 1, 1980 – July 30, 1982
Preceded by Robert E. Drake
Succeeded by Robert E. Rich
Personal details
Born Ann Zeilinger Caracristi
(1921-02-01)February 1, 1921
Bronxville, New York, U.S.
Died January 10, 2016(2016-01-10) (aged 94)
Washington, D.C., U.S.
Education Russell Sage College
Federal Executive Institute
Profession Cryptanalyst, intelligence consultant and official

Ann Zeilinger Caracristi (February 1, 1921 – January 10, 2016) was an American cryptanalyst, former Deputy Director of the National Security Agency,[1] where she served at various positions over a 40-year career. She served as a member of the Secretary of Defense Joint Security Commission and President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board. She became the first woman at NSA to be promoted to GS-18 rank, in 1975.

Biography[edit]

She was born in Bronxville, New York.[2] She lived most of her adult life in a one-bedroom cottage in Georgetown, and her hobbies included birds and collecting pewter.[3]

In 2002, her name was given to a Naval Intelligence Professionals' award.[4] Caracristi died January 10, 2016, in Washington at the age of 94. She had dementia in her later years.[5]

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Former Deputy Directors NSA website.
  2. ^ Who's who of American women. Marquis Who's Who. 1973. ISBN 9780837904085. Retrieved 2015-04-13. 
  3. ^ Orton, Kathy (2016-02-26). "Little red cottage is a cozy secret tucked away in Georgetown". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2016-02-27. 
  4. ^ Ann Caracristi Award Archived June 26, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. on the Naval Intelligence website
  5. ^ Weil, Martin (2016-01-11). "Ann Caracristi, who excelled at code-breaking and management, dies at 94". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2016-01-11. 
Government offices
Preceded by
Robert E. Drake
Deputy Director of the National Security Agency
April 1980 – July 1982
Succeeded by
Robert E. Rich