Anna Bogomolnaia

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Anna Vladimirovna Bogomolnaia (Russian: Анна Владимировна Богомольная) is a Russian economist specializing in microeconomics and game theory. She is a professor in economics at the Adam Smith School of Economics and Finance of the University of Glasgow,[1] and chief research fellow of the International Laboratory for Game Theory and Decision Making at the Higher School of Economics in Russia.[2]

Education and career[edit]

After earning a master's degree in mathematics at Saint Petersburg State University in 1989,[2] Bogomolnaia went to the Autonomous University of Barcelona for doctoral studies in economics.[1] Her 1998 dissertation, Medians and Lotteries: Strategy-Proof Social Choice Rules for Restricted Domains, was supervised by Salvador Barberà [es].[3]

After earning her doctorate, she worked at the University of Nottingham,[1] became an assistant professor at Southern Methodist University,[4] and earned tenure at Rice University in 2005.[5] She took her positions at the University of Glasgow and the Higher School of Economics in 2013 and 2015 respectively.[1][2]

Contributions[edit]

Bogomolnaia is known for her work on coalitions and on randomized solutions to assignment problems. With Hervé Moulin she formulated the probabilistic-serial procedure for solving the fair random assignment problem.[6] With Matthew O. Jackson she introduced the concept of hedonic games to model coalition-forming in multiplayer games.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Professor Anna Bogomolnaia", Our staff, Adam Smith School of Economics and Finance, retrieved 2019-09-15
  2. ^ a b c "Anna Bogomolnaia", Faculty and Staff, Higher School of Economics, retrieved 2019-09-15
  3. ^ Anna Bogomolnaia at the Mathematics Genealogy Project
  4. ^ "Administration and Faculty" (PDF), SMU Catalog, Southern Methodist University, 2000–2001, retrieved 2019-09-15
  5. ^ Board approves promotions, Rice University, June 30, 2005, retrieved 2019-09-15
  6. ^ Haeringer, Guillaume (2018), Market Design: Auctions and Matching, The MIT Press, p. 236, ISBN 9780262345095
  7. ^ Rothe, Jörg (2015), Economics and Computation: An Introduction to Algorithmic Game Theory, Computational Social Choice, and Fair Division, Springer Texts in Business and Economics, Springer, p. 183, ISBN 9783662479049

External links[edit]