Anna Haebich

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Professor Anna Elizabeth Haebich FAHA FASSA is an Australian writer, historian and academic.

Haebich is a John Curtin Distinguished Professor and Senior Research Fellow in the Faculty of Humanities at Curtin University.[1] She was formerly a Research Intensive Professor at Griffith University and prior to that was the foundation Director of the Centre for Public Culture and Ideas at Griffith University. She also led the Griffith Research Program "Creative for Life" that addressed creativity across cultures and generations and was the Griffith University Orbicom UNESCO Chair.[1]

Haebich was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities (FAHA) in 2006 and of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia (FASSA) in 2007.[2][3] She has also been a member of the AIATSIS Research Advisory Committee.[4]

Haebich is the author of a number of influential and award winning books focusing on Indigenous history and Australia's discriminatory policies, including For Their Own Good: Aborigines and Government in the South West of Western Australia 1900 to 1940 (1988) and Broken Circles Fragmenting Indigenous Families 1800-2000 (2000). For Their Own Good won the 1989 Western Australian Premier's Literature Award for Non-Fiction and Broken Circles received a number of awards including NSW Premiers Book of the Year 2001 and 2001 AIATSIS W J Stanner Award.[5]

Haebich was one of a group of writers involved in unraveling the Moore River Native Settlement history,[6] and the legacy of A.O. Neville on generations of indigenous Australians. Susan Maushart, Rosemary van den Berg,[7] Jack Davis, and Doris Pilkington.

More recent publications investigate the personal history of individuals that lived in Western Australia including Murdering Stepmothers The Execution of Martha Rendell and A Boy's Short Life Warren Braedon/Louis Johnson.

The latest publication Dancing in the Shadows - A History of Nyungar Performance (2018), "explores the power of Indigenous performance pitted against the forces of settler colonialism."

Further details are available on-line from The Encyclopaedia of Women and Leadership in Twentieth Century Australia.[8]

Publications[edit]

  • Haebich, A. (2018) Dancing in the Shadows - Histories of Nyungar Performance UWA Publishing.
  • Haebich, A. (2013) A Boy's Short Life Warren Braedon/Louis Johnson - co-authored with Steve Mickler: UWA Publishing.
  • Haebich, A. (2010) Murdering Stepmothers The Execution of Martha Rendell, Nedlands: UWA Publishing.
  • Haebich, A. (2008) Spinning the Dream Assimilation in Australia, Fremantle: Fremantle Press.
  • Haebich, A. (2004) Clearing the wheat belt. Erasing the indigenous presence in the southwest of Western Australia, The Genocide Question.
  • Haebich, A. (2003) Many Voices Reflections on Experiences of Indigenous Child Separation. Canberra: National Library of Australia.
  • Haebich, A. (2000) Broken Circles Fragmenting Indigenous Families 1800-2000, Fremantle: Fremantle Arts Centre Press.
  • Haebich, A. (1988) For Their Own Good: Aborigines and Government in the South West of Western Australia 1900 to 1940, Nedlands: UWA Press.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Professor Anna Haebich". Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. Archived from the original on 25 April 2016. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  2. ^ "Anna Haebich". Australian Academy of the Humanities. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  3. ^ "Professor Anna Haebich". Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  4. ^ "Committees". 9 December 2014. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  5. ^ "Broken circles : fragmenting indigenous families 1800-2000 / Anna Haebich. - Version details". Trove. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  6. ^ Haebich, Anna (1982), On the inside : Moore River Native Settlement in the 1930s, retrieved 19 January 2013
  7. ^ Van Den Berg, Rosemary; Corbett, Thomas (1994), No options no choice! : the Moore River experience : my father, Thomas Corbett, an Aboriginal half-caste, Magabala Books, ISBN 978-1-875641-12-3
  8. ^ Melbourne, The University of. "Haebich, Anna Elizabeth - Woman - The Encyclopedia of Women and Leadership in Twentieth-Century Australia". www.womenaustralia.info. Retrieved 25 May 2017.

External links[edit]