Anna Margolin

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Anna Margolin
Born Rosa Harning Lebensboym
1887
Brest, Belarus, Russian Empire
Died 1952
New York City, United States
Occupation Poet
Nationality United States
Literary movement Di Yunge

Anna Margolin (Yiddish: אַננאַ מאַרגאָלין‎) is the pen name of Rosa Harning Lebensboym (1887–1952) a twentieth century Jewish Russian-American, Yiddish language poet.

Biography[edit]

Born in Brest, Belarus, then part of the Russian Empire, she was educated up to secondary school level, where she studied Hebrew.[1] She first went to New York in 1906, and permanently settled there in 1913. Most of her poetry was written there.[2] Margolin was associated with both the Di Yunge and ‘introspectivist’ groups in the Yiddish poetry scene at the time, but her poetry is uniquely her own.[3]

In her early years in New York City Margolin joined the editorial staff of the liberal Yiddish daily Der Tog (The Day; founded 1914). Under her real name she edited a section entitled "In der froyen velt" (In the women's world); and also wrote journalistic articles under various pseudonyms, including "Sofia Brandt," and – more often, in the mid 1920s – "Clara Levin."[4][5]

Though her reputation rests mainly on the single volume of poems she published in her lifetime, Lider ('Poems', 1929), a posthumous collection, Drunk from the Bitter Truth, including English translations has been published. One reviewer described her work as "sensual, jarring, plainspoken, and hard, the record of a soul in direct contact with the streets of 1920s New York".[6]

Bibliography[edit]

Poetry

  • Lider. [Poems] (1929)
  • Drunk from the Bitter Truth: The Poems of Anna Margolin. Translated Shirley Kumove. (SUNY, 2005) ISBN 0-7914-6579-9 [ Review]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zhitnitski, L.; Jenni Buch; Dr. Samuel Chani (2006-11-06). "Jewish Brest – its Writers and Cultural figures". JewishGen Inc. Retrieved 2007-04-01. 
  2. ^ "Drunk from the Bitter Truth - Summary". SUNY Press. Retrieved 2007-04-01. 
  3. ^ "Modern Yiddish literature > Yiddish women writers". Encyclopædia Britannica. 2006-11-06. Retrieved 2007-04-01. 
  4. ^ Novershtern, Abraham. "'Who Would Have Believed That a Bronze Statue Can Weep': The Poetry of Anna Margolin." Prooftexts 10.3 (September 1990): 435-467; here: 435.
  5. ^ Brenner, Naomi. "Slippery Selves: Rachel Bluvstein and Anna Margolin in Poetry and in Public." Nashim: A Journal of Jewish Women's Studies & Gender Issues No. 19 (Spring 2010): 100-133; here: 112
  6. ^ Nordel, J. D. "Poetry Microreviews". Boston Review. Retrieved 2008-12-15. 

External links[edit]