Annapolis High School (Michigan)

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Annapolis High School
Address
4650 Clippert Street
Dearborn Heights, MI, Wayne County, Michigan 48125
USA
Coordinates 42°16′33″N 83°14′50″W / 42.2758714°N 83.2471503°W / 42.2758714; -83.2471503Coordinates: 42°16′33″N 83°14′50″W / 42.2758714°N 83.2471503°W / 42.2758714; -83.2471503
Information
Type Comprehensive Public High School
Motto Achieving Higher Standards
Established 1967
Opened 1967
School district Dearborn Heights Schools District No.7
CEEB code 230792
Principal Cheryl Howard[1]
Grades 9 to 12
Gender coed
Enrollment approx. 900
Campus type Suburban
Color(s) Blue and Gold          
Fight song Fight on Cougars
Athletics conference Western Wayne Athletic Conference
Mascot The Cougars
Nickname AHS
Newspaper The Cougar Crier
Yearbook The Catamount
Website

Annapolis High School is a high school located in Dearborn Heights, Michigan, United States. The school was established in 1967 and first accredited in 1970. Annapolis High School is one of three high schools located in Dearborn Heights, the others being Crestwood High School and Robichaud High School.

History[edit]

The school was built in the late 1950s and was known as Best Junior High School.[citation needed] It wasn't until November 29, 1966 at a school board meeting when it was decided that Annapolis High School was to be established. Annapolis opened their doors in Sept. 1967 to approximately 450 students. Annapolis High School was first accredited by the University of Michigan in 1970.[2][3]

Hair colors[edit]

In 2002, a student was suspended from Annapolis High School for dying his hair red.[4] Following the 1999 Columbine High School shootings, there was a nationwide trend towards increased school dress code restrictions. However, the American Civil Liberties Union noted that restricting personal freedoms might, in turn, contribute to more extreme behavior.

Football program[edit]

In 2002, the high school made headlines when it dropped its football program due to lack of student interest.[5][6][7] This happened again in 2012 when the team did not have enough upperclassmen to support a varsity team, and the few varsity players that were left played JV football with the freshmen and sophomores. This resulted in controversy throughout the school's athletic conference, and additional controversy was caused by uncalled penalties on the offensive line in a win at Garden City.

Zero tolerance policy[edit]

In 2014, an Annapolis High School student carrying a pocketknife during a football game was suspended pending a hearing before a special school committee, and eventually the Board of Education.[8] According to the Michigan school code, a district "...shall expel the pupil from the school district permanently..." a student found in possession of "...a weapon that constitutes a dangerous weapon..."[9] The special school committee did not find in the student's favor, and instead upheld the punishment.[10] The matter was brought to the district Board of Education, who decided that the student would be permitted to take online classes and graduate on time, despite upholding the suspension.[11]

Notable Alumni[edit]

  • Terrance Gerin (1993), a professional wrestler and actor, known as "Rhino".
  • Sonya Tayeh (1995), an Emmy Award nominated professional choreographer.
  • George Noory (1967), a three-time Emmy Award-winning radio talk show host.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Annapolis High School : Administration". Farmington Public Schools. Retrieved 2016-01-31. 
  2. ^ The University of Michigan Accredited Schools. University of Michigan. 1981. p. 7. Retrieved 2014-10-14. 
  3. ^ University of Michigan Official Publication (Volume 70, Issue 18 ed.). UM Libraries. 1968. p. 7. Retrieved 2014-10-14. 
  4. ^ "Schools crack down on student hair colors". The Argus-Press. The Argus-Press. 2002-02-06. Retrieved 2014-10-14. 
  5. ^ Newspaper Archive
  6. ^ Newspaper Archive
  7. ^ Annapolis High School - Dearborn Heights, Michigan - MI - School overview
  8. ^ Gross, Allie. "The Zero-Tolerance Trap". Slate. The Slate Group. Retrieved 2014-10-14. 
  9. ^ "Michigan Legislature - Section 380.1311". Michigan Legislature Website. Legislative Council, State of Michigan. Retrieved 2014-10-14. 
  10. ^ Weber, Roger. "Dearborn Heights honor student suspended rest of school year for knife". ClickOnDetroit. ClickOnDetroit. Retrieved 2014-10-14. 
  11. ^ "Honor student who brought pocketknife to school suspended for the year". myFOXDetroit.com. Fox Television Stations. Retrieved 2014-10-14. 

External links[edit]