Anne L. Stevens

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Anne Louise Stevens (born 1948) is an American mechanical and materials engineer. She is the CEO of GKN Aerospace. Previously, Stevens was Chairman of the Board of Directors, President and Chief Executive Officer of Carpenter Technology Corporation and vice president of North America Vehicle Operations for Ford Motor Company.

Early life and education[edit]

Stevens was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, in 1948.[1] Her mother suffered from Motor neurone disease so she spent time with her father by attending local stock car races.[2] In high school, she disguised herself in order to enrol in the male-only mechanics pit crew at a race track.[1] After graduation, Stevens enrolled in nursing but dropped out and took a job at Bell Telephone where she met her future husband.[1] By the age of 20, Steven was married and had two children with her husband Bill Stevens. While working as a stay at home mom, she became inspired by Betty Friedan's book The Feminine Mystique.[2]

Stevens and her husband enrolled at Drexel University and she graduated with a bachelor's degree in mechanical and materials engineering.[3]

Career[edit]

After earning her degrees, Steven worked at the Exxon Chemical Company for ten years in multiple engineering and manufacturing positions.[1] She then joined the Ford Motor Company in 1990 as a marketing specialist.[3] Stevens was promoted at various times during her tenure at Ford. In 1992, she was named manager of a Quality Services Department and by 2001, was named vice president of North America Vehicle Operations.[3] In 2000, Stevens was the recipient of the Shingo Leadership Award and was later appointed to the Shingo Prize Board of Governors.[4] In 2003, Stevens received the Eli Whitney Award from the Society of Manufacturing Engineers[5] and was promoted to group vice president of Canada, Mexico, and South America branches of the Ford Motor Company.[6] The next year, she was elected to the National Academy of Engineering[7] and honoured by the Automotive Hall of Fame.[8]

In 2005, she became the first female executive vice president in the history of the Ford Motor Company.[9] However, this title was short-lived as she resigned in September 2006 alongside Dave Szczupak.[10] The next month, Stevens was appointed Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Carpenter Technology, succeeding Robert J. Torcolini.[11] Upon her promotion, Stevens became the companies first female CEO in their history.[4] In 2007, Stevens donated $1 Million to Drexel University to start the Anne L. Stevens Scholarship Program for Young Women.[12] In 2008, Stevens was honoured with the Best 50 Women in Business Award.[13] She was also elected to serve on the Albright College Board of Trustees on a three-year term.[14] She stayed in her role as CEO until 2009, when she resigned and Carpenter Technology split her roles into separate positions.[15] As a result of the resignation and split, Stevens received a cash payment of $1.76 million.[16] Moving on from Carpenter, Stevens focused on her non-executive director position at Lockheed Martin until she stepped down at the end of 2017 to become Chief Executive Officer of GKN Aerospace.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Krismann, Carol (2005). Encyclopedia of American Women in Business: M-Z. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 515–517. ISBN 9780313333842. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  2. ^ a b "BIG SHOT OF THE WEEK: If GKN boss Anne Stevens was looking for a challenge she has certainly got one now". thisismoney.co.uk. February 16, 2018. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c Hooks Hawkins, Carol (November 18, 2008). American Women Leaders: 1,560 Current Biographies. McFarland. p. 331. ISBN 9780786438471. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  4. ^ a b "Carpenter CEO Anne Stevens speaks at spring commencement". psu.edu. May 6, 2008. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  5. ^ "Manufacturing Leaders to Be Honored at SME Annual Meeting May 30". mcadcafe.com. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  6. ^ "Alumna Anne Stevens '80 Elected to NAE". drexel.edu. January 10, 2004. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  7. ^ "National Academy of Engineering". nationalacademies.org. February 13, 2004. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  8. ^ "UNDERCURRENTS: Ford's executive staff is well represented". autonews.com. February 2, 2004. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  9. ^ Durbin, De-Ann (October 14, 2005). "Ford appoints first female executive V.P". nwitimes.com. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  10. ^ "Top Ford execs Anne Stevens, Dave Szczupak quit". autonews.com. September 14, 2006. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  11. ^ "Anne Stevens Appointed Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Carpenter Technology". thomasnet.com. October 30, 2006. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  12. ^ "MSE Alumna Anne L. Stevens Donates $1 Million to CoE". drexel.edu. July 17, 2007. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  13. ^ "Berks executives to receive 2008 Best 50 Women in Business Award". readingeagle.com. March 26, 2008. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  14. ^ "Four Trustees Appointed to Board". albright.edu. Winter 2008. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  15. ^ "Carpenter Tech CEO resigns; roles split". The Philadelphia Inquirer. October 12, 2009. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  16. ^ "Carpenter's ex-executive gets $1.76 million". readingeagle.com. July 30, 2010. Retrieved October 9, 2019.
  17. ^ "GKN confirms Anne Stevens as Chief Executive amidst plans to separate Aerospace and Automotive businesses". pm-review.com. January 12, 2018. Retrieved October 9, 2019.