Annie Dale Biddle Andrews

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Annie Dale Biddle Andrews (December 13, 1885 – April 14, 1940) was the first woman to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley.[1][2]

She was born in Hanford, California, the daughter of Samuel E. Biddle and A. A. Biddle. In 1911, she wrote her thesis, Constructive theory of the unicursal plane quartic by synthetic methods, under her maiden name, Annie Dale Biddle;[1] it was published by the university in 1912.[3] Her advisors were Derrick Norman Lehmer and Mellen Haskell.[4] She was a math instructor at the University of Washington from 1911 to 1912, after which she married Wilhelm Samuel Andrews.[1] She worked as a math instructor at the University of California between 1915 and 1932 and published a paper in the Journal of the American Mathematical Society around 1933.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Riddle, Larry (May 22, 2007). "Annie Dale Biddle Andrews". Agnes Scott College. Archived from the original on 20 October 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-02. 
  2. ^ Green, Judy; LaDuke, Jeanne (2008). Pioneering Women in American Mathematics — The Pre-1940 PhD's. History of Mathematics. 34 (1st ed.). American Mathematical Society, The London Mathematical Society. ISBN 978-0-8218-4376-5.  Biography on p.25-26 of the Supplementary Material at AMS
  3. ^ Riddle, Larry (May 4, 2006). "Annie Biddle Abstract". Agnes Scott College. Archived from the original on 27 September 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-02. 
  4. ^ "Annie Biddle". The Mathematics Genealogy Project. North Dakota State University. Archived from the original on 20 October 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-02.