Anput

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Anput
Anput.jpg
Name in hieroglyphs
M17N35
Q3
E15X1
H8
Symboljackal, canopic jars, mummy gauze
ConsortAnubis
OffspringKebechet
Anput (right) depicted on a triad statue with Hathor and the Pharaoh Menkaure
Hathor, King Menkaura, and Anput

Anput is a goddess in ancient Egyptian religion. Her name is written in hieroglyphs as jnpwt (reconstructed in Middle Egyptian as /ʔan.ˈpa.wat/ or /jan.ˈpa.wat/).[1] In English, her name also is rendered as Anupet, Input, Inpewt, and Yineput.[1] As the female counterpart of her husband, Anubis, who was known as jnpw to the Egyptians, Anput's name ends in a feminine "t" suffix when seen as jnpwt.

She was often depicted as a pregnant or nursing jackal, or as a jackal wielding knives. She also is depicted as a woman, with a headdress showing a jackal recumbent upon a feather. Probably the most notable example of this representation is that of the statue of the triad of Hathor, Menkaure, and Anput. She occasionally is depicted as a woman with the head of a jackal, but this is very rare.[2]

Mythology[edit]

Anput is the female counterpart of the god Anubis.[3] She is also a goddess of the seventeenth nome of Upper Egypt.[4] She is also considered the protector of the body of Osiris.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Seawright, Caroline (October 8, 2001). "Anubis, God of Embalming and Guide and Friend of the Dead". Archived from the original on 8 January 2014. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  2. ^ Hill, J (2010). "Gods of ancient Egypt: Anput". Ancient Egypt Online. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  3. ^ Wilkinson, Richard H. (2003). The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt. Thames & Hudson. p. 190
  4. ^ DuQuesne, Terence (2007), Anubis, Upwawet, and Other Deities: Personal Worship and Official Religion in Ancient Egypt, p. 20